NCRP

Distinguished Emeritus Members

Meinhold C

CHARLES B. MEINHOLD

Meinhold C

is Emeritus President of NCRP. He was a member of the Council for 26 y, and served as President for 11 y; he was Chair of Scientific Committee (SC) 46 for Operational Radiation Safety, and Chair of SC 1 for 12 and 3 y, respectively. Mr. Meinhold was a member of the Main Commission of the International Commission on Radiation Protection from 1978 to 2002. He was Chairman of Committees 2 and 3, each for 8 y. Charles Meinhold completed his term as President of the International Radiation Protection Association in 1996 during the International Meeting in Vienna, Austria. He served as Vice President from 1998 to 1992 and was a member of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation from 1996 to 2009.

Charles Meinhold began his career in Health Physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York in 1957. He received his BS in Physics from Providence College in 1956 and completed a year of graduate work at The University of Rochester on an U.S. Atomic Energy Commission Fellowship. In 1972 he became Senior Health Physicist and Division Head of the Safety and Environmental Division of BNL with responsibilities for health physics, industrial hygiene, occupational safety, fire protection and security.

Throughout his career Mr. Meinhold has been active in virtually all aspects of radiation protection and safety, not only at BNL but as a mentor or consultant to Con Ed Indian Point #2 station, Boston Ed Pilgrim Station, L.I. Shoreham Nuclear Station, Rocky Flats, and Los Alamos National Laboratories.

Mr. Meinhold was President of the Health Physics Society from 1981 to 1982 and Treasurer from 1975 to 1977. He is an Honorary Professor of both the China Institute of Atomic Energy and the China Institute for Radiation Protection and a recipient of the Marie Sklodowska Curie Medal from the Marie Sklodowska Curie Society, Warsaw, Poland.

Since retirement Charles has been very active in the work of the St. Vincent Society. He is married to Anne and has three daughters, two sons, and 12 grandchildren.

charles b. meinhold, President Emeritus

Tenforde

THOMAS S. TENFORDE

Tenforde

THOMAS S. TENFORDE served as President of NCRP from 2002 until his retirement in 2012. In 1962 he received his BA degree cum laude from Harvard University, with a general studies major and a speciality in physics, and received his PhD in biophysics from the University of California at Berkeley in 1969. Prior to being elected President of NCRP, he was a Senior Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (1969 to 1988) and a Fellow at Battelle’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (1988 to 2002). His special areas of research include nonionizing radiation (for which he received the D’Arsonval Medal from the Bioelectromagnetics Society in 2001) and the production of radionuclides with medical applications. He received awards from the U.S. Department of Energy in 2000 and the Federal Laboratory Consortium in 2001 for leading the development of yttrium-90 as a therapeutic medical isotope that is used worldwide for the treatment of cancer and other medical disorders.

He is a member of several scientific societies, including the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (recipient of the William D. Wagner Award in 2013), the Bioelectromagnetics Society (President, 1987 to 1988), the Biophysical Society, the Health Physics Society (elected as HPS Fellow in 2013), the Radiation Research Society, Sigma Xi, and the Society of Nuclear Medicine. He is the author or coauthor of 170 peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and technical reports. During his tenure as President, NCRP issued more than 55 publications, including 31 reports, 7 commentaries, 2 statements, 5 presidential reports, 10 conference proceedings, and many peer-reviewed articles in technical journals and scientific news magazines.

He and his wife Susan, who has a BA degree in biology from Stanford University, have two sons, Adam and Mark, who have received MD degrees and are performing clinical care, research, and teaching at universities and medical centers in the United States and other nations worldwide. Adam received his MD from the Stanford University School of Medicine, and is a specialist in physical medicine and rehabilitation with a subspecialty in sports medicine. Mark received his MD from the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, and is a specialist in infectious diseases.

thomas s. tenforde, President Emeritus
Dr. Stanley James Adelstein, M.D., Ph.D.

S. JAMES ADELSTEIN

Dr. Stanley James Adelstein, M.D., Ph.D.

is Paul C. Cabot Distinguished Professor of Medical Biophysics. He received his MD degree from Harvard Medical School and his PhD in Biophysics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He did postdoctoral work at Cambridge University and at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. In the 1970s he organized nuclear medical units at Peter Bent Brigham (now Brigham and Women's) Hospital, Children's Hospital of Boston, and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, which were affiliated to become a teaching, clinical and research organization known as the Joint Program in Nuclear Medicine.

Dr. Adelstein served as the Executive Dean for Academic Programs at Harvard Medical School from 1978 to 1997. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and recipient of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's Hermann Blumgart, Paul Aebersole, and George de Hevesy Awards. His research has focused on the biophysical effects of highly ionizing radiation emitted by radionuclides. Dr. Adelstein was elected to NCRP in 1978, served on several report-writing committees, and was Vice President of NCRP from 1983 to 2002.

s. james adelstein, Vice President, Emeritus

Kase

KENNETH R. KASE

Kase

is Honorary Vice-President of NCRP. He was a member of the Council for 24 y, served as Senior Vice President for 9 y, and for 12 y as Scientific Vice President and Chair of Scientific Committee 46 for Operational Radiation Safety. He also was a member of Committee 4 of the International Commission on Radiation Protection from 1997 to 2001. Dr. Kase completed his term as President of the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) in May 2012. He served as Vice-President from 2004 to 2008, and chaired the International Congress Program Committee for the 2000 International Congress on Radiation Protection (IRPA 10) in Hiroshima, Japan.

Kenneth Kase began his career in Health Physics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, California, in 1963 and moved to Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in 1969. In 1975 he received a PhD from Stanford University and was appointed to the faculty of Radiation Oncology at the Harvard Medical School. He was appointed Professor of Radiation Oncology at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in 1985. In 1992 he returned to Stanford and was appointed Associate Director of SLAC and Director of the Environment, Safety and Health Division in 1995. He retired from that post in 2001 and from SLAC in 2005. Currently he is associated with Lyncean Technologies, Inc., an research and development firm in Palo Alto, California. He is married to Grady and has two daughters and 6 grandchildren.

Throughout his career Dr. Kase has been active in research activities related to radiation physics and radiation protection, particularly in radiation measurements and the operation of particle accelerators. He has published over 75 papers in peer reviewed journals, co-authored one book, and edited three others on radiation dosimetry.

Dr. Kase served on the Board of Directors of the Health Physics Society (HPS) from 1989 to1992 and 2002 to 2005 and as President of the HPS in 2003 to 2004. He served on the Board of Directors of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) from 1984 to 1991, and as AAPM Treasurer from 1986 to 1991. Dr. Kase also has been an associate editor of Health Physics, Medical Physics, and Radiation Research.

kenneth r. kase, Vice President, Emeritus
W. Roger Ney W. Roger Ney, Executive Director Emeritus

SchauerD

DAVID A. SCHAUER

SchauerD

is Adjunct Associate Professor at Georgetown University and the University of Nevada Las Vegas. From 1984 to 2004, Dr. Schauer served in various scientific and leadership positions as an officer in the U.S. Navy. One of the highlights of his career was serving on the faculty of the Radiology and Radiological Sciences Department at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. In 2004, he was appointed Executive Director of the congressionally chartered NCRP. He served in this position until 2012 when he was named Executive Director Emeritus. During his time at NCRP the Council published 27 reports, four commentaries, one statement, and eight annual meeting proceedings.

Dr. Schauer received his ScD degree from Johns Hopkins University and he's a diplomate of the American Board of Health Physics. He sits on the editorial boards of Radiation Measurements and Radiation Protection Dosimetry. He has served on expert committees for the World Health Organization and International Atomic Energy Agency, and he's a Health Physics Program Evaluator for the Accreditation Board on Engineering and Technology.

david a. schauer, Executive Director Emeritus
Abrahamson SSeymour Abrahamson

Ahearne J

JOHN F. AHEARNE

Ahearne J

is Executive Director Emeritus of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society. He has a PhD in physics from Princeton University, is co-chair of the U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He has been chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and member or chair of more than 20 National Academy committees.

He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society, and the Society for Risk Analysis and has taught at the Air Force Academy, Colorado College, the University of Colorado-Colorado Springs, and Duke University.

john f. ahearne

Lynn R. Anspaugh

Lynn R. Anspaugh

Anspaugh-L

Lynn R. Anspaugh is Research Professor of Radiobiology Emeritus, University of Utah. Dr. Anspaugh is an expert on radiation dosimetry and radiation dose reconstruction. He worked 33 y at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in a number of positions, including 10 y as Leader of the Environmental Sciences Division. Dr. Anspaugh has been involved in dose-reconstruction studies for persons exposed to fallout from nuclear weapons tests, the Chernobyl accident, releases from the Mayak Production Association in Russia, and the Fukushima accident. Dr. Anspaugh is the author or co-author of 350 papers and reports, most of which are related to radiation-dose-reconstruction activities.

Dr. Anspaugh has been a consultant to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the International Atomic Energy Agency, and the World Health Organization. He has been a member of the U.S. delegation to UNSCEAR since 1987.

Lynn R. Anspaugh

Archer B

Benjamin R. Archer

Archer Bis a Professor of Radiological Sciences at Baylor College of Medicine where he has been employed since 1984. He received his doctorate from the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences / M.D. Anderson and is certified in diagnostic imaging physics by the American Board of Radiology and the American Board of Medical Physics. He has served on numerous national committees and task groups. He was co-chair of the scientific committee that produced NCRP Report No. 147, Structural Shielding Design for Medical X-Ray Imaging Facilities (2004). Dr. Archer is a Distinguished Emeritus member of the Council and has been elected to fellowship in the American College of Medical Physics, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, and the American College of Radiology.

Benjamin R. Archer

Auxier John A. Auxier

Beck H

HAROLD L. BECK

Beck H

was a physicist for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/ERDA/Atomic Energy Commission for over 36 y. Mr. Beck retired in 1999 as the Director of the Environmental Science Division of the DOE Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) in New York City and is presently a self-employed consultant specializing in environmental radiation dose reconstructions. During his tenure at EML, he also served as Director of the EML Instrumentation Division, and as Acting Deputy Director of the Laboratory. Mr. Beck has authored well over 100 publications in the areas of radiation physics, radiation measurement, dose reconstruction, environmental radiation, and radiation dosimetry. He served as Scientific Vice President for Radiation Measurements and Dosimetry of NCRP from 1996 to 2003, and in 2004 was elected to Distinguished Emeritus membership in NCRP. From 2004 to 2006, he served as a member of the National Academy of Sciences, National Research Council (NAS/NRC) Board on Radiation Effects Research /Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board.

He currently serves as a member of the Veterans (federal advisory) Board on Dose Reconstruction and the U.S. Scientific Review Group, DOE Russian Health Studies Program. He has served as an expert member on a number of NCRP and NAS/NRC scientific studies related to radiation dosimetry and as Chair of two NCRP committees and one NCRP Program Committee. He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Nuclear Society, and a Fellow of the Health Physics Society.

harold l. beck

BedfordJ

JOEL S. BEDFORD

BedfordJ

is Professor of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences at Colorado State University, and holds a joint faculty appointment in the University Graduate Program in Cell and Molecular Biology. He received a D. Phil. degree in Radiobiology from Oxford University. He then joined the faculty at Vanderbilt University in 1966 and was promoted to Associate Professor in 1971. In 1975 he moved to his present position at Colorado State University. His research has focused principally on cellular radiation biology, radiation cytogenetics, carcinogenesis, genetic factors altering susceptibility to radiation effects and cancer biology. His programs have been funded, without interruption, by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the U.S. Department of Energy, and/or the National Aeronautics and Space Administration since 1966. He served as a regular member and Chairperson of the NIH Radiation Study Section, and as a Councilor, Associate Editor, and later as President of the Radiation Research Society. He has received various awards such as the Failla Award and the Excellence in Mentoring Award from the Radiation Research Society.

He was a regular member of the National Academies' Board on Radiation Effects Research, and then on the National Academies' Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board. He served a 5 y term on the Scientific Council of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima, Japan, and is a member of NCRP. He is a member of NCRP Program Area Committee 1. Dr. Bedford has authored some 150 peer reviewed articles, including several book chapters, and is an inventor on two patents.

joel s. bedford

BRUCE B. BOECKER

BRUCE B. BOECKER

BRUCE B. BOECKER

graduated from Grinnell College and then studied radiological physics at the University of Washington. He then served 2 y in the U.S. Air Force (USAF) as a First Lieutenant, focusing primarily on the dispersion and cleanup of plutonium from a possible nuclear weapon accident. These studies included participation in the development of nuclear safety responses to plutonium dispersion conducted at the Nevada Test Site during Operation Plumbob in 1957. After his USAF service, he continued his graduate studies of radiobiology and health physics in the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) Project at the University of Rochester School of Medicine. He obtained MS and PhD degrees based on internal dosimetry research related to inhaled plutonium and thorium, respectively. He then joined the staff of the AEC-funded project which eventually became the Lovelace Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI). During his career at the ITRI, he progressed from a position of radiobiologist to Assistant Director of the ITRI and a Senior Fellow.

The research interests of Dr. Boecker have been mainly in two broad areas, namely (1) inhalation toxicology, and (2) dose-response relationships for long-term biological effects produced by internally-deposited radionuclides. He was particularly involved in the conduct of animal experimentation to develop information that was used to predict the consequences of accidental exposure of man or to establish standards that ensure the safe and orderly conduct of activities that may result in release of toxic agents to man's environment. His personal research efforts have been associated primarily with the toxicology of airborne radionuclides associated with different segments of the nuclear fuel cycle. This research spanned broadly from studies of aerosol characteristics as they may influence patterns of deposition, retention and dosimetry on through to risk assessments for different nuclear energy systems.

In addition to his responsibilities within the ITRI, Dr. Boecker served on many committees dealing with various aspects of radiation safety. These committees were sponsored by various organizations such as the AEC, the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Academies/National Research Council, the National Institutes of Health, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. He has also been heavily involved with committees and activities of the NCRP, the International Commission on Radiological Protection, and the Health Physics Society (HPS). He served on the Board of Directors of NCRP and HPS and as an NCRP Technical Staff Consultant. He is a Fellow of HPS and a recipient of the HPS Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award. He is a Scientist Emeritus of the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, LRRI, and an NCRP Distinguished Emeritus Member.

bruce b. boecker

BorakT

THOMAS B. BORAK

BorakT

is Professor Emeritus on the faculty of the Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences at Colorado State University. He received a BS in physics from St. John's University (Minnesota) and a PhD degree in physics from Vanderbilt University.

His research interests are in radiation physics and dosimetry which has included radiation safety for uranium miners deep within the Earth, to astronauts during space missions beyond the earth. Previously he has had scientific staff appointments at the European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva, as well as Fermilab and Argonne National Laboratory in the United States.

He was as elected to the Council in 2001 and became a Distinguished Emeritus Member in 2013. He served on the scientific committee for NCRP Report No. 132, Radiation Protection Guidance for Activities in Low-Earth Orbit (2000) and Report No. 160, Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States (2009).

He has been a consultant to the Governor of Colorado concerning issues relating to low-level radioactive waste management and nuclear criticality safety. Dr. Borak was a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) committees on Risk Assessment of Exposure to Radon in Drinking Water (1999) and Assessment of the Scientific Information for the Radiation Exposure Screening and Education Program (2005). He is currently a member of the NAS committee on Airport Passenger Screening: Backscatter X-Ray Machines. He recently served on the Radiation Advisory Committee for the Science Advisory Board of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Borak served on the Board of Directors of the Health Physics Society and is certified by the American Board of Health Physics.

thomas b. borak

Bouville A

ANDRE BOUVILLE

Bouville A

was born and educated in France. He came to the United States in 1984 to work for the National Cancer Institute (NCI). His initial assignment was to estimate the thyroid doses received by the American people from 131I released by the nuclear weapons tests that were conducted at the Nevada Test Site in the 1950s. This study led to the assessment of doses from nuclear weapons tests conducted at other sites all over the world, as well as to a large number of dosimetry studies related to the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. He was the head of the Dosimetry Unit of the Radiation Epidemiology Branch at NCI until he retired at the end of 2010. Throughout his career, Dr. Bouville actively participated in the preparation of scientific reports under the umbrella of international organizations, notably the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, the World Health Organization, the International Atomic Energy Agency, and the Nuclear Energy Agency.

Regarding U.S. organizations, Dr. Bouville was a member of NCRP for 12 y, became a Distinguished Emeritus Member in 2011, and is currently Chair of Scientific Committee 6-9 on the dosimetry for the Million-Worker Study. He has served on numerous National Academy of Science committees, is a Lifetime Associate of the National Academies, and is currently a member of the Committee on the analysis of cancer risks in populations near nuclear facilities. For all his achievements, Dr. Bouville was a recipient of the Presidential Rank Meritorial Award in 2003.

andre bouville

braby

LESLIE A. BRABY

braby

has been a Research Professor at Texas A&M University since 1996. His previous experience includes Biology and Chemistry Department Staff Scientist from 1971 to 1991 and Radiation Physics and Chemistry Section Manager from 1991 to 1995 at Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. He received his BA degree from Linfield College and PhD from Oregon State University in 1972.

Dr. Braby is a former member of the NCRP Board of Directors and a member of several NCRP scientific committees (SC) including SC 88 on Fluence as a Basis of a System of Radiation Protection for Astronauts, SC 1-7 on Research Needs for Deep Space Missions, chair of SC 1-11 on Safety Considerations for Pulsed Fast Neutron Surveillance Systems, SC 6-1 on Uncertainties in Measuring External Beam Irradiation, SC 1-20 on the biological effects of low energy x rays, and Chairman of SC 6-5 on Safety of Cargo Inspection Systems Using High Energy Photons. He was also Chair of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) working committee on characterizing low level radiation exposure, and member of ICRU working committee to prepare a report on microdosimetry.

 

leslie a. braby

Brent R

ROBERT L. BRENT

Brent R

is the Distinguished Professor, Louis and Bess Stein Professor of Pediatrics, Radiology and Pathology at the Jefferson Medical College, Director of the Clinical and Environmental Teratology Laboratories at the Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, Delaware. Robert Brent was born in Rochester, New York in 1927, received his AB (1949); MD with honor (1953), a PhD (1955) in radiation biology and embryology and Honorary DSc degrees from the University of Rochester and the Jefferson Medical College. From 1944 to 1954 he worked in the cosmic ray research laboratories of the physics department and as a research associate in the genetics and embryology divisions of the Manhattan Project of the University of Rochester, where he began his studies on the teratogenic effects of ionizing radiation. As a graduate student he was appointed the Head of the embryology section of the medical school's atomic energy facility. He was the first research (1953) and clinical fellow (1954) of the March of Dimes involved in congenital malformations research. He spent his army tour at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research as Chief of Radiation Biology (1955 to 1957).

He came to Jefferson in 1957 and has received every award that Jefferson can offer a faculty member, and for having received continuous federal research funding as a principal investigator for his entire research career. In 1989, he was named the third Distinguished Professor in Jefferson's 188 year history.

He was elected to NCRP in 1973. In 2006 he delivered the L.S. Taylor Lecture, having already received the highest honor of the Teratology Society and the Health Physics Society. He was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in 1996. He was the editor of "Teratology" for 17 years, and has been invited to China five times and to Japan seven times as a Visiting Lecturer and has had invited lectureships in 27 countries. In 1994 he was selected by the Chinese government as the President of the first International Congress on Birth Defects in China. Dr. Brent will receive the John Scott Award of the American Philosophical Society on November 22, 2013 for his research pertaining to the environmental causes of birth defects but especially for his early research that indicated that the embryo was less vulnerable to the carcinogenic effect of ionizing radiation than the child or adult.

Dr. Brent's greatest recognition has come from his research, publications and lecturing. He is the most frequently consulted authority on the effects of radiation on the embryo and is frequently consulted about other possible teratogenic exposures. His research on the effects of radiation on the embryo demonstrated the no-effect dose for congenital malformations, established that radiation effects on the embryo were due to the direct effects of the radiation, and demonstrated some of the characteristics of the "all-or-none period" of embryonic development.

His writings in the field of litigation concerning the proper role of an expert witness were important. As one of the defense experts in the Bendectin litigation, his testimony contributed to the famous Daubert decision that allowed judges to reject the testimony of junk scientists. His publications include six books and monographs, five movies, 458 publications, and over 400 abstracts.

robert l. brent

Brooks A

ANTONE L. BROOKS

Brooks A

retired in 2008 from the Washington State University Tri-cities as a Professor in the Environmental Science Department. His career included positions as Laboratory Senior Scientist and Section Manager at Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Manager of the Cellular and Molecular Toxicology Group at Lovelace Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, Albuquerque; and Technical Representative in Washington D.C. for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health and Environmental Research. He is a member of the Health Physics Society, the Mutation Research Society, and the Radiation Research Society.

Dr. Brooks' research interests include cytogenetics, radiation-induced cancer, radiation risk, and public outreach on radiation effects. The focus of his research has been understanding the biological changes induced by low doses of ionizing radiation. Dr. Brooks served as the Principal Investigator for the project "Optimizing the Scientific Regulatory and Societal Impact of the DOE Low-Dose Research Program." This includes radiation from both external radiation sources and from internally-deposited radioactive materials. The use of biomarkers for exposure, dose, susceptibility and disease have been a major research effort directed toward making it possible to better estimate radiation risk using short term biological endpoints. Dr. Brooks has authored or co-authored over 170 publications.

In 1961, Dr. Brooks earned a BS in Experimental Biology and 2 y later received his MS in Radiation Ecology both at the University of Utah. Dr. Brooks completed his PhD in Physical Biology in 1966 at Cornell University.

Dr. Brooks was first elected to NCRP in 1979 and served as a member for 30 y becoming a Distinguished Emeritus Member in 2009. Dr. Brooks served on the Board of Directors and was Scientific Vice President for PAC 1, Basic Criteria, Epidemiology, Radiobiology and Risk from 2005 to 2008. He chaired Scientific Committees (SC) 1-3, 57-10, 57-11; co-chaired both SC 1-13 and 57-10; and was a member of SC 45 and SC 83. Dr. Brooks chaired the 2008 and served as a member in 2002 of the Annual Meeting Program Committee.

antone l. brooks

Caswell R Randall S. Caswell

ChenSY

SHIH-YEW (S.Y.) CHEN

ChenSY

is currently Director of Professional Master of Health Physic Program at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), Chicago. Prior to joining IIT, he was Senior Environmental Systems Engineer and also served as the Strategic Area Manager in Risk and Waste Management in the Environmental Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. He received his BS in nuclear engineering from National Tsing Hua University in Taiwan and obtained his MS and PhD in nuclear engineering from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana. Dr. Chen's professional interests include radiation protection, human and environmental health risk, and nuclear accident analysis; with special expertise in environmental cleanup, radioactive material disposition management, and nuclear waste transportation.

Dr. Chen has been a NCRP Council member since 1999, and served on its Board (2004 to 2011). He currently serves as NCRP Scientific Vice President on Environmental Radiation and Waste Issues (since 2004). Dr. Chen has served on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board/Radiation Advisory Committee since 2009. He is a long-time member of the Health Physics Society and of the American Nuclear Society. He was elected to Fellow by the Health Physics Society in 2013, and is a Certified Health Physicist by the American Board of Health Physics. While at Argonne, Dr. Chen developed an integrated risk assessment program that addresses the broad-based issues to support federal risk-based policies. Dr. Chen had served on numerous capacities at NCRP, including chairing Scientific Committee (SC) 87-4 which led to the publication of Report No. 141, Managing Potentially Radioactive Scarp Metal, and also chairing SC 5-1, Decision Making for Late-Late Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Incidents. He served as Chair of NCRP 2005 Annual Meeting Program Committee, Managing the Disposition of Low-Activity Radioactive Materials, and as Co-Chair of NCRP 2013 Annual Meeting Program Committee, Radiation Dose and the Impacts on Exposed Populations.

Shih-Yew chen

Cossairt J

J. DONALD COSSAIRT

Cossairt J

is Senior Radiation Safety Officer of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois. He received a BA in physics and mathematics from Indiana Central College (now the University of Indianapolis) (1970) and a PhD in experimental nuclear physics from Indiana University Bloomington (1975). His career began with a postdoctoral appointment in nuclear physics research at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron Institute. He began his transition to health physics with his move to Fermilab in 1978 and has led Fermilab's radiation protection program since 1989. He became certified by the American Board of Health Physics in 1982. He is a member of the American Physical Society, a Fellow Member of the Health Physics Society (HPS), and served as a Council Member of NCRP for 12 y before becoming a Distinguished Emeritus Member in 2007. His principal interests are in radiation physics and associated instrumentation at particle accelerators.

Dr. Cossairt has numerous publications in health physics, nuclear physics, and particle physics and has served on many review panels and has been a frequent lecturer at the academic sessions of the U.S. Particle Accelerator School. He was co-academic dean of the Professional Development School of the Health Physics Society in Oakland, California in 2008. He received a G. William Morgan Lectureship Award from HPS in 2011. He has contributed to several NCRP publications and commentaries, perhaps the most notable one being NCRP Report No. 144, Radiation Protection for Particle Accelerator Facilities (2003).

j. donald cossairt

Croff A

ALLEN G. CROFF

Croff A

is an adjunct professor at Vanderbilt University lecturing and participating in projects concerning the nuclear engineering and the nuclear fuel cycle, and a consultant to the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. He worked at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for 30 y in areas concerning waste management, nuclear fuel cycle, and nuclear materials research and development. His career at ORNL included creation of the ORIGEN2 computer code, developing and evaluating radioactive waste classification systems, and evaluating current and advanced nuclear fuel cycles.

After retiring from ORNL in 2003, he was vice-chairman of the Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste and Materials that provided technical advice to the commissioners of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on waste disposal, the fuel cycle, and nuclear materials management from 2004 to 2008. He then became a senior technical advisor to the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future from 2010 to 2012 in parallel with his activities at Vanderbilt University.

Throughout his career he had extensive external U.S. and international involvements on technical review, oversight and integration committees. He has been a member of 10 committees, and the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board of the National Academy of Sciences, he led the committee that wrote NCRP Report No. 139 concerning risk-based waste classification, he was a member of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee, and chaired the Nuclear Development Committee of the Nuclear Energy Agency for 10 y.

allen g. croff

DeLuca

PAUL M. DELUCA

DeLuca

received a BS in physics and math in 1966 and a PhD in nuclear physics from the University of Notre Dame in 1971. That same year he joined the University of Wisconsin as a research associate, and in 1975 he was appointed to the faculty of the Department of Radiology. Following the creation of the Department of Medical Physics in 1981, he served as chair from 1987 through 1998 and holds an appointment as professor in the Departments of Medical Physics, Radiology, Human Oncology, Engineering Physics and Physics. In 1999, DeLuca assumed a role in the UW School of Medicine and Public Health as associate dean for research and graduate studies, and his administrative role was expanded in 2001 with his appointment as vice dean.

His research interests have concentrated on fast neutron dosimetry including production of intense sources of fast neutrons, determination of elemental neutron kerma factors and application of microdosimetry to radiation dosimetry. DeLuca is an internationally recognized expert in high energy particle radiation effects on humans. He is Chairman of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements. He is also a member and chair of the Nonproliferation and International Security Division Review Committee (DRC) at Los Alamos. Other national and international associations and professional society affiliations include the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, American Physical Society, Health Physics Society, Council on Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards, and Institute of Physics.

Paul M. DeLuca

Donaldson S

SARAH S. DONALDSON

Donaldson S

is the Catharine and Howard Avery Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine and Associate Residency Program Director in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Stanford. She also serves as the Chief of the Radiation Oncology service at the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford. She is recognized as an authority in clinical radiation oncology, with particular interest and expertise in childhood cancer, breast cancer, lymphomas, and sarcomas. She has a long time interest in the late effects of cancer and its treatment.

Dr. Donaldson received her undergraduate and nursing degrees from the University of Oregon, a BMS from Dartmouth Medical School in 1966, and her MD from Harvard Medical School in 1968. She completed her Radiation Oncology residency at Stanford, joined the faculty in 1973, and has served Stanford continuously since that time.

A member of many professional organizations, Dr. Donaldson has held numerous national leadership roles. She is a former president and the first female president of both the American Board of Radiology and the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. She also has been President of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) and a trustee of the R&E Foundation of the RSNA. In addition, she has served the Board of Directors of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Dr. Donaldson has received numerous honors and awards including the Marie Curie Award of the American Association for Women Radiologists, the Janeway Medal of the American Radium Society, the Henry S. Kaplan Memorial Prize for teaching, the Hoppe Leadership award, the Hewlett Award from the Department of Medicine, and the Dean's Medal at Stanford. She has received gold medals from the del Regato Foundation, the American College of Radiology, and the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science member of the National Academies Institute of Medicine.

sarah s. donaldson

No Image William P. Dornsife

Eckerman K

KEITH F. ECKERMAN

Eckerman K

in Radiological Physics from Northwestern University in 1972. Dr. Eckerman joined the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1979 as leader of the Dosimetry Research Group after working at Argonne National Laboratory and with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. He is a member of Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection and Chairman of its Task Group on Dose Calculations. In 1999 he received the Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award from the Health Physics Society and in 2001 the Loevinger-Berman Award from the Society of Nuclear Medicine.

keith f. eckerman

Ely T

Thomas S. Ely

Ely T

Thomas S. Ely received his MD from Georgetown University in 1948 and an MS in Radiation Biology and Occupation Medicine from the University of Rochester in 1963. Beginning in 1943, Dr. Ely served in the U.S. Navy until he joined the Medical Branch in the Department of Biology and Medicine, U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in 1956. He left AEC in 1962 to become a professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. Dr. Ely joined the Eastman Kodak Company in 1963 and retired as Director of the Occupational Health Laboratory in 1986. Dr. Ely is an independent consultant in the field of radiation safety.

He is a member of several organizations including the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American College of Preventive Medicine, the Bioelectromagnetics Society, and the American College of Occupational and Environment Medicine. Dr. Ely became a member of Council in 1970 and was elected as a Distinguished Emeritus member in 1994.

thomas s. ely

Feig SA Stephen A. Feig
Frazier J

JOHN R. FRAZIER

Frazier J

is an independent, health physics consultant with over 35 y of professional experience in a wide range of radiation protection areas. His areas of expertise include external and internal radiation dosimetry, environmental dose assessment, radiation risk assessment, radiation spectroscopy, health physics training, radiation detection and measurement, and radiological site characterization. Dr. Frazier earned a BA in Physics from Berea College, an MS in Physics from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, and a PhD in Physics (with health physics emphasis) from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. His dissertation research was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the study of interactions of low-energy electrons with large molecules. He completed Comprehensive Certification in health physics from the American Board of Health Physics in 1981 and has been recertified through 2013.

Dr. Frazier is a past-president of the American Academy of Health Physics and a fellow and past-president of the Health Physics Society. He is serving in his second term as an elected member of NCRP and has served on Scientific Committees 46 and 2-1 and on Program Area Committee 2 for the past 7 y. Dr. Frazier was awarded the 1988 Elda E. Anderson of the Health Physics Society and presented the 2007 John C. Villforth Lecture to the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors. He has served as an advisor to numerous federal agencies on a wide range of health physics and radiation protection topics from operational health physics program design to environmental radiation dose and risk assessments. Dr. Frazier has also served as a consultant to private companies and individuals on numerous health physics issues.

john r. frazier

Fry

R.J. Michael Fry

Fry

qualified in Medicine at the University of Dublin, spent a few years in clinical appointments before he returned to the Physiology Department at the University. During the next 10 y he spent 2 y on leave at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff working mainly on cell proliferation. Two years after returning to Dublin he became a member of the staff at ANL becoming a senior scientist and professor in the Department of Radiology, University of Chicago. In 1977 he joined the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and is now retired. While at ORNL he was Editor of Radiation Research.

Dr. Fry became a member of NCRP 32 y ago and was involved in NCRP Reports Nos. 64, 115, 116, 132, 142, 150, and 153 that reflected his interest in radiation carcinogenesis, including space radiation. He served on committees of the National Academy of Sciences, including the now defunct National Committee of Photobiology and finally the Board on Radiation Effects Research. Other service included on the International Commission on Radiological Protection from 1985 to 2001, the International Association for Radiation Research, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the National Institutes of Health Radiation Study Section. It was a lot of committees but membership was a great educational experience.

R.J. Michael Fry

Gesell T

THOMAS F. GESELL

Gesell T

served as a Director and Vice President of NCRP. Dr. Gesell retired in January 2014 from Idaho State University (ISU) where he was Professor of Health Physics and directed the Environmental Monitoring Program. He has a BS degree in physics from San Diego State University and MS and PhD degrees in physics with specialization in health physics from the University of Tennessee.

Prior to joining ISU in 1991, Dr. Gesell directed the Department of Energy's (DOE) Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory located on the Idaho National Laboratory Site. While there he managed several programs related to protection of health and environment. Before joining DOE in 1981 he was Associate Professor of Health Physics at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston where he taught in health physics and conducted research on various aspects of dosimetry and environmental radiation.

He has numerous papers in the literature focused on dosimetry and environmental radiation and has published, with Merril Eisenbud, the fourth edition of "Environmental Radioactivity from Natural, Industrial and Military Sources" (Academic Press, 1997). He is a Fellow and past Director of the Health Physics Society, and serves on the Environmental Safety and Health Panel for the University of California Office of the President. He completed a 6 y term on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board (Radiation Advisory Committee) in 2002 and has also served on committees of the National Research Council and Los Alamos National Laboratory.

thomas f. gesell

Ethel S. Gilbert

Ethel S. Gilbert

Gilbert Eis a staff scientist in the Radiation Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute (NCI). She received a BA in mathematics from Oberlin College and an MPH and PhD in biostatistics from the University of Michigan. She spent several years as a senior staff scientist at Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, where her research focused on epidemiologic studies of nuclear workers and on analyzing data from experimental animal studies, and also spent a year at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima, Japan. Dr. Gilbert joined NCI in 1996 as an Expert and received the National Institutes of Health Merit Award in 2003. Dr. Gilbert is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and an honorary member of NCRP. She was a member of the National Academy of Sciences BEIR VII Committee on Health Risks from Exposure to Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation, and was also a member of the study group for the 15-country nuclear worker study.

Ethel S. Gilbert

Gray J

JOEL E. GRAY

Gray J

is Professor Emeritus, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and President of DIQUAD, LLC (Dental Image Quality and Dose), a firm that evaluates dental image quality and dose through the mail. Dr. Gray received his BS in Photographic Science and Instrumentation in 1970, an MS in Optical Sciences in 1974, and a PhD in Radiological Sciences from the Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Toronto in 1977.

He served as a Diagnostic Medical Physicist at Mayo Clinic Rochester for 20 y, helped develop and obtain U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for Lorad's (now Hologic) first digital mammography system, and assisted in the development of the microStar patient dosimetry system using optically stimulated dosimetry material while at Landauer, Inc. After leaving Landauer, Dr. Gray founded DIQUAD and continues to operate that business today.

Dr. Gray published the first two books on quality control in medical imaging in 1976 under contract to FDA while in graduate school. Dr. Gray is the primary author of the first quality control text (Quality Control in Diagnostic Imaging—A Quality Control Cookbook) which is in use worldwide and has been translated into Chinese.

His primary areas of interest include image quality in medical and dental imaging, and optimization of image quality and radiation dose. He serves as a consultant to healthcare organizations and industry. Dr. Gray has served on many national and international advisory committees, including the International Commission Radiological Protection (Committee 3, Radiation Protection in Medicine) and is active in projects with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization. He has co-authored eight publications for the IAEA including educational programs and taught courses for the IAEA in several countries. He has over 170 publications in refereed journals and numerous book chapters, and presented lectures and refresher courses in the United States and overseas. He has visited over 40 countries for both business and pleasure.

Dr. Gray was responsible for starting the first Medical Physics Residency Program at Mayo Clinic in 1990. He has mentored masters and doctoral students, and Medical Physics residents.

He was elected to NCRP in 1986 and has served on numerous committees producing NCRP Report No. 99, Quality Assurance for Diagnostic Imaging; Report No. 147, Structural Shielding Design for Medical Imaging Facilities; and Report No. 160, Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States. He has served as a Technical Consultant for NCRP Commentary No. 20, Radiation Protection and Measurement Issues Related to Cargo Scanning with Accelerator-Produced High-Energy X Rays; NCRP Report No. 172, Reference Levels and Achievable Doses in Medical and Dental Imaging: Recommendations for the United States; and is presently serving on Scientific Committee 4-5 on radiation protection in dentistry supplement, in that capacity. After serving 18 y on the Council he was named a Distinguished Emeritus Member in 2005.

Dr. Gray is a Fellow of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the American College of Medical Physics. In 2010 he received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Upstate New York Association of Medical Physicists and in 2011 the Edith Quimby Lifetime Achievement Award from the AAPM.

joel e. gray

Guilmette

RAYMOND A GUILMETTE

Guilmette

received a BS in nuclear engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and an MS in environmental health sciences and a PhD in radiological health from New York University. For almost 40 y, he has been studying the metabolism, biokinetics, dosimetry, biological effects of internally deposited radionuclides, developing methods for removing radionuclides from the body (decorporation), and studying the mechanisms of deposition, clearance and retention of inhaled materials. Most of this research was performed at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute (LRRI) (formerly the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute), where he worked for 23 y. From 2000 through 2007, he was team leader for internal dosimetry at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, assessing radiation doses for workers who were exposed to radionuclides associated with the nuclear weapons industry.

In 2007, he returned to LRRI as director of the Center for Countermeasures Against Radiation where he evaluated the efficacy of chemical compounds designed to decorporate radionuclides as well as drugs designed to ameliorate the effects of acute radiation syndrome from large external radiation doses in small and large animal models. He is a past president of the Health Physics Society, received its Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award in 2002, and has given several honorary lectures (Newell Stannard Memorial Lecture, 2006; G. William Morgan Lecture, HPS, 2009; inaugural Patricia W. Durbin Memorial Lecture, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 2010). He is a member of scientific committees of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, NCRP (a past board member), the International Agency for Research on Cancer, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and the U.S. National Academies of Science.

raymond a guilmette

Hall E

ERIC J. HALL

Hall E

is the Higgins Professor Emeritus of Radiation Biophysics at Columbia University, and Special Lecturer in Radiation Oncology. Until December 2007 he was Director of The Center for Radiological Research, a position he held for 24 y.

Dr. Hall has been in New York for over 45 y, after receiving his doctorate in radiobiology from Oxford University in the United Kingdom. He has received more than 30 honors and awards, from societies in the United States and the United Kingdom including gold medals from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), the Radiological Society of North America, the American College of Radiology, and the American Roentgen Ray Society, the Janeway Medal from the American Radium Society, the Failla Award from the Radiation Research Society (RRS), and the Kaplan Award of the International Association for Relationship Research. Dr. Hall is an honorary fellow of both the American College of Radiology and the Royal College of Radiology, an honor conferred on few laboratory scientists. He is also a Fellow of ASTRO and the Society of Radiological Protection.

Dr. Hall is the author of over 380 publications in peer-reviewed journals and has authored or co-authored four books, one of which, Radiobiology for the Radiologist, is the definitive text for students of radiation biology and is in its seventh edition.

His research interests include radiation carcinogenesis by low doses of radiation, and the radiobiological basis of radiotherapy. He is currently funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and by the U.S. Department of Energy low-dose program.

He is past president of RRS, the American Radium Society, and the International Association of Radiation Research.

eric j. hall

Naomi H. Harley

Naomi H. Harley

Harley Nis Professor, Department of Environmental Medicine at the New York University School of Medicine. Her major research interests are in the measurement of inhaled or ingested radionuclides, measurement of environmental radioactivity, the modeling of their fate within the human body, the calculation of the detailed radiation dose to the cells specific to carcinogenesis, and cancer risk modeling from inhaled or ingested radionuclides.

Naomi H. Harley

Hendee W

WILLIAM R. HENDEE

Hendee W

received a PhD in physics from the University of Texas. He joined the University of Colorado, ultimately serving as Professor and Chair of Radiology for several years. In 1985 he moved to Chicago as Vice President of Science and Technology for the American Medical Association. In 1991 Dr. Hendee joined the faculty of the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) as Senior Associate Dean and Vice President with faculty appointments as professor and vice chair of radiology with additional professorships in biophysics, radiation oncology, and bioethics. He is also Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Marquette University; Adjunct Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; and Adjunct Professor of Radiology at the University of New Mexico, University of Colorado, and Mayo Clinic - Rochester . From September through December 1994, Dr. Hendee served as Acting Executive Vice President and Dean of the Medical College. In January 1995 he assumed additional responsibilities as Dean of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. In 2005 he was appointed President of the MCW Research Foundation. He currently holds the title of Distinguished Professor of Radiology, Radiation Oncology, Biophysics and Bioethics at MCW.

Dr. Hendee is certified in Radiologic Physics by the American Board of Radiology and in Health Physics by the American Board of Health Physics. He has been a Director of the American Board of Health Physics and the Health Physics Society, chairman of the Diagnostic Physics and Quality and Safety Committees for the American Board of Radiology, and Past-President of the American Board of Radiology. He is past president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the Society of Nuclear Medicine, the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering, the 2000 World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, and past vice president of the National Patient Safety Foundation. He is the past-chair of the American Board of Radiology Foundation, and is currently President and Chief Executive Officer of the Commission on the Accreditation of Medical Physics Educational Programs. Dr. Hendee has authored or co-authored over 400 scientific articles and 24 books. He is the editor of Medical Physics, the most widely distributed and read journal in medical physics and engineering in medicine in the world. In 2010 he was awarded the American College of Radiology Gold Medal Award. He received an honorary doctorate from Millsaps College in 1988 and from the University of Patras, Greece in 2009. Other awards include the Radiological Society of North America's Gold Medal, the Gold Medal from the American Roentgen Ray Society, the Elda Anderson Award of the Health Physics Society, and the William D. Coolidge Medal from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

william r. hendee

Hoffman O

F. OWEN HOFFMAN

Hoffman O

is known internationally for his contributions to uncertainty analysis in dose reconstruction and risk assessment. Since 1971, he has worked extensively with issues of exposure pathways analysis, dose assessment, and the evaluation of the health risk to humans. He helped pioneer application of the principles of quantitative uncertainty analysis to estimate the range of scientific credibility in radiation dose estimates. He served as general chairman for an international guidance document (IAEA Safety Series No. 100, 1989) and a national guide (NCRP Commentary No. 14, 1996) on the use of quantitative uncertainty analysis in environmental assessments, dose reconstruction and risk analysis. In 1999, Dr. Hoffman chaired the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Science Advisory Board review of EPA's uncertainty analysis of radiogenic cancer risk.

From 2009 to 2012, he served as an expert consultant to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation Subcommittee on Uncertainties in Radiation Risk Estimates. From 1989 to 1996, he was a Chief Scientist to the International Atomic Energy Agency on studies using Chernobyl fallout data to test and evaluate exposure assessment models. He has recently directed the development of the Interactive Radioepidemiological Program for the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, which estimates the uncertainty in the excess relative risk and the probability of causation (i.e., "assigned share") for individuals exposed in the past who have been diagnosed with cancer. He was an advisor for NCRP Report No. 171 (2012), Uncertainties in the Measurement of Radiation Risks and Probability of Causation.

Currently he is involved with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the evaluation of doses received nationwide from U.S. and global fallout from testing of nuclear weapons during the 1950s and early 1960s and the lifetime risk of developing radiogenic thyroid cancer. He is also working with NCI in the development of an interactive online radiation risk assessment tool to quantify the uncertainty in the excess lifetime risk of cancer resulting from single or multiple sources of exposure to ionizing radiation.

He is a Distinguished Emeritus Member of NCRP, and President and Director of the Oak Ridge Center for Risk Analysis.

f. owen hoffman

Kahn

BERND KAHN

Kahn

is a radiochemist and health physicist; he specializes in developing radioanalytical methods to measure environmental radionuclides at low levels and in applying them in the design and operation of environmental radiation monitoring programs. He has degrees in chemical engineering (BS, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 1951), physics (MS, Vanderbilt University, 1953), and chemistry (PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1961), and has worked for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (1951 to 1954), the U.S. Public Health Service (1954 to 1974), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (1970 to 1974), and the Georgia Institute of Technology (1974 –present).

He is associate director, Environmental Radiation Laboratory, Electro-Optical Systems Laboratory, Georgia Tech Research Institute, and professor emeritus, Nuclear and Radiological Engineering Program, Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology. His current research is radiation detection and spectroscopy aspects of scintillating nanoparticles within a glass matrix.

bernd kahn

Kennedy A

ANN R. KENNEDY

Kennedy A

is a Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine and the Richard Chamberlain Professor of Research Oncology at the University of Pennsylvania. She received her PhD in Radiation Biology from Harvard University and remained at Harvard as a faculty member for many years before joining the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania. She has been performing research on mechanisms of carcinogenesis and cancer prevention for her entire career, with research investigations including studies on molecular mechanisms, animal studies, and human trials. Much of the work in the Kennedy laboratory has focused on the soybean-derived protease inhibitor known as the Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI). BBI was originally identified as a cancer preventive agent from in vitro studies, and was then shown to prevent the development of cancer in many different models of animal carcinogenesis.

BBI, as Bowman Birk Inhibitor Concentrate (BBIC), is now being evaluated as a human cancer chemopreventive agent and as a therapeutic agent for several different human diseases. Much of her recent effort has been aimed at developing countermeasures for radiation induced adverse health effects which could occur in astronauts during space travel. She is currently the Team Leader for the Radiation Effects Team of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, as well as a Co-Team Lead of the Space Radiation Element of the Human Research Program at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Dr. Kennedy is an author of more than 265 scientific papers. She is currently a Distinguished Emeritus member of NCRP.

ann r. kennedy

KocherD

DAVID C. KOCHER

KocherD

has extensive experience in areas of environmental health physics and assessments of dose and risk from exposure to ionizing radiation. He has special expertise in evaluations of dose and risk assessment models for regulatory and decision-making purposes, and he has written and lectured extensively on the issue of "risk harmonization" in regulating radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in the environment. Dr. Kocher's work on assessing the biological effectiveness of different radiation types and their uncertainties was an important contribution to the development of the Interactive Radio-Epidemiological Program, and he was principal investigator on work for the Defense Threat Reduction Agency to develop improved models and methods of uncertainty analysis for use in dose reconstructions.

Dr. Kocher has served on several advisory groups for Federal agencies and on committees of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and NCRP, including committees that produced an NAS report on "A Review of the Dose Reconstruction Program of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency" and committees that produced NCRP reports on "Risk-Based Classification of Radioactive and Hazardous Chemical Wastes" (Report No. 139), "Approaches to Risk Management in Remediation of Radioactively Contaminated Sites" (Report No. 146), and "Performance Assessment of Near-Surface Disposal Facilities for Low-Level Radioactive Waste" (Report No. 152). He also was a member of a committee of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that produced a DOE Standard on "A Graded Approach for Evaluating Radiation Doses to Aquatic and Terrestrial Biota." Dr. Kocher has been a frequent consultant to the International Atomic Energy Agency on issues of radioactive and hazardous chemical waste management and protection of the environment.

david c. kocher

Komaki R

RITSUKO KOMAKI

Komaki R

is Professor and the Section Chief in Thoracic Radiation Oncology in the Division of Radiation Oncology and the Gloria Lupton Tennison Distinguished Endowed Professor for the Lung Cancer Research at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. She went to medical school at Hiroshima University, and received her training and fellowship in Radiation Oncology at the Medical College of Wisconsin and MD Anderson, and received tutelage under Dr. Gilbert Fletcher. She was on faculty at Wisconsin, at Columbia University, and subsequently went to MD Anderson, where she remains since 1988, where she has been a professor since 1994. Dr. Komaki has been an innovative researcher and clinician, and has been and still is the principle investigator in a number of important Radiation Therapy Oncology Group clinical trials in lung cancer.

For her contributions to the field, she has been recognized with numerous awards, including the American Society for Radiation Oncology Fellow in 2006, the Marie Sklodowska-Curie Medal in 2006, which commemorates the 100th anniversary discovery of Radium by Madam Cure, the Juan del Regato Gold Medal in 2008, the American Society of Clinical Oncology Cancer Foundation Merit Award in 2009, the Gold Medal from the Japan Lung Cancer Society in 2009, a Gold Medal from the Japan Radiological Society in 2009, and the Gold Medal from the Japan Society of Therapeutic Radiology in 2010. She was also appointed to be the Emeritus Professor of Japanese Association of Women Radiation Oncologists. Dr. Komaki has been appointed to be the invited professor of Kyoto University in 2009 to 2010. She was given a special award of Takahashi Memorial Lecturer from Japan Radiological Society in April 2009. She has served as the president of American Radium Society in 2008, and was president of the Fletcher Society 2013.

ritsuko komaki

Land C Charles E. Land

LanghorstS

SUSAN M. LANGHORST

LanghorstS

is the Radiation Safety Officer at Washington University in St. Louis and an Assistant Professor at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology. Dr. Langhorst also serves as the Radiation Safety Officer for the radioactive material safety programs at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and St. Louis Children's Hospital. Dr. Langhorst was appointed in September 2009 and currently serves as the radiation safety officer representative on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Advisory Committee on the Medical Use of Isotopes. After completing her undergraduate education at the University of Missouri-Rolla, Dr. Langhorst earned her masters and doctorate of philosophy in nuclear engineering and health physics at the University of Missouri-Columbia. She went on to serve as the Health Physics Manager at the University of Missouri Research Reactor and eventually as the Radiation Safety Officer at the University of Missouri-Columbia.

Dr. Langhorst spent a year sabbatical as an Oak Ridge Associated Universities Faculty Research Fellow in Washington, DC supporting the Office of Science and Technology's Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination. Dr. Langhorst has been involved with several national organizations. She was involved with National Academy of Sciences serving on the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board (2004 to 2006). Dr. Langhorst has been a member of the NCRP since 1999, served on the Nominating Committee (2005 to 2010), and chaired the Program Committee on Operational Radiation Safety (2002 to 2005).

susan m. langhorst

Linet M

MARTHA S. LINET

Linet M

has been a senior investigator at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) since 1987, and was previously an Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. She served as Chief of the Radiation Epidemiology Branch of the National Cancer Institute during 2002 to 2014. She received a BA from Brandeis University, an MD from Tufts University School of Medicine, and an MPH from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where she completed post-doctoral training in epidemiology. Dr. Linet is board certified in Internal Medicine and General Preventive Medicine.

Dr. Linet is principal investigator of studies assessing the role of protracted low-dose radiation exposure and cancer risks in medical radiation workers, including radiologic technologists and physicians performing fluoroscopically-guided interventional procedures. She has also studied the role of magnetic field exposures from power lines and electrical appliances in relation to childhood leukemia; cellular telephone use and risk of adult brain tumors; and ultraviolet solar radiation exposure and risk of skin and other cancers. Dr. Linet has a long-standing interest in assessment of a broad range of postulated risk factors for childhood and adult hematopoietic malignancies, including occupational benzene and other occupational and environmental exposures, medical conditions, medications, measures of early life infections, and potential protective factors such as breastfeeding, vitamin D, and periconceptional folic acid supplements.

Dr. Linet served on the Board of Directors (1999 to 2004) and as President of the American College of Epidemiology (2004 to 2005) and has been a member of the NCRP since 2010. She was a member of Scientific Committee 4-4 on the Risks of Ionizing Radiation to the Developing Embryo, Fetus and Nursing Infant that prepared NCRP Report No. 174. Dr. Linet has been a member of the National Academy of Sciences Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board since 2011. She has also served on advisory groups to the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the U.K. Leukemia and Lymphoma Research Society, and on Editorial Boards (American Journal of Epidemiology and the Journal of the National Cancer Institute). Among her honors are election to the American Epidemiological Society and the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars. Dr. Linet has received NIH Director’s and NCI Merit Awards, the NCI Mentor of Merit Award, the Henry L. Moses Award for outstanding clinical paper, and the American College of Epidemiology Distinguished Service Award.

martha s. linet

Little J John B. Little

McClellan R

ROGER O. McCLELLAN

McClellan R

interest in radiation and radionuclides are rooted in his growing up near the Hanford Nuclear Site where he moved with his parents in 1944. Working at Hanford as a student stimulated his interest in the radiological sciences. After receiving a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from Washington State University in 1960, he joined the staff of the Hanford Laboratories, which continues today as the Pacific Northwest Laboratories. In 1965 and 1966, while on a special assignment with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission in Washington, DC, he attended his first NCRP meeting. From 1966 to 1988, McClellan provided leadership for the Lovelace Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico program that conducted pioneering research on the acute and long-term health effects of inhaled fission product and transuranic radionuclides. From 1988 to 1999, Dr. McClellan provided leadership for the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology, Research Triangle Park, North Caroline.

These programs have been internationally recognized for the conduct of lifespan studies in laboratory animals and mechanistic studies on modes of action for both carcinogenic and noncancer effects to complement information gained from epidemiological studies. In 1971, he was elected to the Council serving as a member for 30 y. In 2002, he was elected as a Distinguished Emeritus Member of NCRP. In addition to serving on numerous NCRP committees concerned with the toxicity of internally-deposited radionuclides, he has been an advisor to all the major federal agencies concerned with the health hazards of environmental and occupational exposures to radiation and chemicals. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology and American Board of Veterinary Toxicology, and a Fellow of the Health Physics Society, Academy of Toxicological Sciences, American Association for Aerosol Research, Society for Risk Analysis, and American Association for Advancement of Science. In 1990, he was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Science.

Roger O. mcClellan

McNeil B

Barbara J. McNeil

McNeilis the Ridley Watts Professor and founding head of the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School. She is also a professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Dr. McNeil’s research activities have focused on several areas, most notably technology assessment and quality of care. Her most recent work includes two large studies supported by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The first focused on a comparison of quality of care for veterans with cardiac disease with the care provided to Medicare beneficiaries seen in private settings. Its report led to the introduction of many changes in the care of veterans with cardiac disease. As a result of that study, she and her colleagues recently completed a similar study on cancer care; they studied patients with lung cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer, or several hematological malignancies. She and colleagues from Abt Associates are now evaluating the extent to which the infrastructure for research in the VA matches the needs of its investigators. With Drs. Chernew and Landon and colleagues from the Children’s Hospital, she is examining the impact of global payments in Massachusetts on the care of children.

Dr. McNeil received her AB degree from Emmanuel College, her MD from Harvard Medical School, and her PhD from Harvard University. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences (where she was recently chair of its Board of Health Care Services) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is now vice chair of the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board of the National Academy of Sciences. Also, she serves on the Board of Directors of Edwards LifeSciences (Irvine, California).

Previously Dr. McNeil served as a member of the Prospective Payment Assessment Commission and the Publications Committee of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Barbara J. McNeil

MettlerF

FRED A. METTLER, JR.

MettlerF

is currently Professor Emeritus and Clinical Professor at the Department of Radiology at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine. He was chairman of the department for 18 y from 1994 to 2003. He is currently in the Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Service at the New Mexico Federal Regional Medical Center.

He graduated with a BA in Mathematics from Columbia University and in 1970 he received his MD from Thomas Jefferson University. He performed a rotating internship at the University of Chicago and subsequently completed a Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Residency at Massachusetts General Hospital. He received an MS in Public Health from Harvard University in 1975. He is a fellow of both the American College of Radiology and the American College of Nuclear Physicians. He is board certified in both radiology and nuclear medicine.

Dr. Mettler has authored over 360 scientific publications including 20 textbooks, and holds four patents. The books are on Medical Management of Radiation Accidents, Medical Effects of Ionizing Radiation and Radiology and Nuclear Medicine. He was a Scientific Vice President of NCRP and remains a member. He has chaired several committees for the Institute of Medicine/National Research Council and is a member of the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board of the National Academies. He is also an academician of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. Dr. Mettler has been listed in "The Best Doctors in America" since 1994 as an expert in both nuclear medicine and radiation injury. He has been a certifying examiner for the American Board of Radiology for 30 y.

He was the United States Representative to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation 28 y. He is an Emeritus Commissioner of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP). He was the Health Effects Team Leader of the International Chernobyl Project. He has served as an expert on radiation effects and accidents for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the International Agency on Research on Cancer, and for the Costa Rican, Peruvian, Panamanian, Polish governments. He was a co-author of the NCRP and ICRP reports on radiation protection during radiological terrorism and has been a member of multiple subgroups on radiological terrorism for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. He is currently a health advisor to the Japanese Cabinet for the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

fred a. mettler, jr.

Miller K

KENNETH L. MILLER

Miller K

is Emeritus Professor of Radiology and former Director, Division of Health Physics at the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center of the Pennsylvania State University in Hershey, Pennsylvania.

During his career, Mr. Miller authored over 600 presentations, scientific exhibits, and publications (including 18 books). In 1995 he was elected to NCRP. In 2007 he was named a Distinguished Emeritus Member of the Council. He served on Scientific Committee (SC) 46 and then Program Area Committee 2 from 1995 to 2013. He participated in the writing on nine NCRP reports (chaired two committees) and two commentaries (chaired both committees).

Mr. Miller served on numerous federal, state and local advisory committees and held membership in various professional societies. He was an International Radiation Protection Association Delegate and, served on the Board of Directors and as Parliamentarian of the Health Physics Society. He served as a member of the American Board of Health Physics, the American Board of Medical Physics (ABMP), and as a member of the Panel of Examiners for ABMP (Medical Health Physics). In 1982 he received the Elda E. Anderson Award; in 1998, the Fellow Award; in 2004, the Founders Award from the Health Physics Society. From 1994 to 2000 he was Editor-in-Chief of Health Physics. From 1998 to 2005 he was Editor-in-Chief of Operational Radiation Safety. The University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health named him a Distinguished Alumni and the Delaware Valley Society for Radiation Safety of the Health Physics Society presented him with their Meritorious Achievement Award. Upon his retirement from the Penn State Hershey Medical Center the Chair of Radiology was endowed in his name. He currently lives in Hershey, Pennsylvania with his wife Carole and their three dogs, Breeze, Breena and Angel.

kenneth l. miller

Moghissi

A. Alan Moghissi

Moghissiformed the Institute for Regulatory Science (RSI) in early 1985 after spenting over two decades of federal service at the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). At the EPA, Alan Moghissi held a number of positions including that of Principal Science Advisor for Radiation and Hazardous Materials. Later on, he joined the University of Maryland Baltimore as Assistant Vice President, and Temple University in Philadelphia as Associate Vice President. In both universities his portfolio included operational aspects of environmental health and safety. Alan Moghissi's research has dealt not only with his primary area of education which includes biological and environmental kinetics, but increasingly with the development and implementation of the concept of “Best Available Science” in societal-including regulatory-decisions. Alan Moghissi has written over 400 papers including several books, and has edited a number of scientific journals. Alan Moghissi received his training in Zurich, Switzerland and Karlsruhe, Germany where he received a doctorate degree in physical chemistry.

A. Alan Moghissi
Myers

DAVID S. MYERS

Myers

received a BS in physics from Ripon College and an MPH in health physics from the University of Michigan under an AEC Fellowship. He was a health physicist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory from 1965 to 2000 where he held various positions including Health Physics Group Leader and Radiation Safety Division Leader. Mr. Myers is a member and Fellow of the Health Physics Society and certified by the American Board of Health Physics. He has served on the American Board of Health Physics and as a director of the American Academy of Health Physics.

David Myers served on the Council from 1996 to 2013 and has served on NCRP Scientific Committee 46 (now Program Area Committee 2) on operational health physics since 1988. He served as chairman of PAC 2 from 2006 to 2013. He and his wife, Linda, reside in Livermore, California and have a daughter Anne and a son Steve.

david s. myers

Paperiello

Carl Paperiello

Paperiello Cis a Senior Nuclear Consultant to Talisman. He is a retired U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Senior Executive with extensive experience in health physics, fuel cycle and materials licensing, waste management and decommissioning, NRC inspection and enforcement, emergency preparedness, regulatory policy and international nuclear regulatory activities. He has extensive experience with regulating the safety of fuel reprocessing facilities, including performance of environmental radiochemistry analyses and environmental analytical method development for Nuclear Fuels Reprocessing at West Valley, New York, for the New York State Health Department; management responsibility for the NRC’s oversight of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities at West Valley and the licensing of a DOE MOX facility; management responsibility for the development of potential NRC licensing of decommissioning of Hanford reprocessing waste tanks; and management responsibility for the NRC office with potential licensing responsibility for fuel reprocessing. Dr. Paperiello was the former Director of NRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Director of NRC's Office of Nuclear Materials Safety and Safeguards and was the Deputy Executive Director for Materials, Research and State Programs. He has NRC regional experience, including the position as Deputy Regional Administrator, Region III (Chicago). He has experience in Nuclear Physics, Environmental Radiochemical Analysis and Nuclear Spectroscopy. He has both worked on and led numerous inspection teams and task groups. He has been certified in Comprehensive Health Physics since 1975 and was recently re-elected NCRP Council member. Dr. Paperiello currently holds a Q clearance through DOE’s Office of Naval Reactors.

Carl Paperiello

Poston J

JOHN W. POSTON

Poston J

is a Professor in the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Associate Director of the Nuclear Power Institute. He has been at Texas A&M University since 1985 and served for 10 y as the Department Head. Prior to coming to Texas A&M, he was on the faculty at the Georgia Institute of Technology and, earlier, at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Babcock & Wilcox Company in Lynchburg, Virginia. He is a Fellow of the American Nuclear Society, the Health Physics Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a Distinguished Emeritus Member of NCRP. Currently, he serves as the NCRP Vice President for Program Area Committee 3, Nuclear and Radiological Security and Safety.

john w. poston

PoznanskiA

ANDREW K. POZNANSKI

PoznanskiA

earned a BSc in Physics and Mathematics and MDCM from McGill University in Montreal (1956). Interned at the Montreal General Hospital and completed a residency in Radiology at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit.

Dr. Poznanski served on staff at Henry Ford Hospital and was Co-Director of Radiology at CS Mott Children's Hospital and Professor of Radiology at the University of Michigan from 1968 to 1979; Research Scientist at the Center of Human Growth and Development at the University of Michigan; and Radiologist- in-Chief at Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago from 1979 to 2000. He was attending radiologist at Children's Memorial from 2000 to 2010 and Professor of Radiology at Northwestern University School of Medicine from 1979 to 2010. He became Professor Emeritus and retired from clinical practice in 2010.

Dr. Poznanski is the recipient of gold medals from the Society for Pediatric Radiology, International Skeletal Society, American Roentgen Ray Society, and the Chicago Radiologic Society. He is an Honorary member of the European Congress of Radiology, the Canadian Association of Radiologists, the Polish Radiological Society and the Australasian Society for Pediatric Imaging. He is past president of the Society for Pediatric Radiology, the American Roentgen Ray Society, and the International Skeletal Society. Past trustee of the American Board of Radiology. Served as member the Main Commission of the International Commission on Radiological Protection and on its Committee on Protection in Medicine. Dr. Poznanski was a member of NCRP from 1977 to 2001 and served on the Board of Directors from 1983 to 1989.

Dr. Poznanski authored The Hand in Radiologic Diagnosis in 1974, Practical Approaches to Pediatric Radiology in 1976, and The Hand in Radiologic Diagnosis with Gamuts and Pattern Profiles in 1984. In 2002, he co-authored Bone Dysplasias: An Atlas of Genetic Disorders of Skeletal Development. He chaired the NCRP scientific committees which wrote Report No. 68, Radiation Protection in Pediatric Radiology and Report No. 99, Quality Assurance for Diagnostic Imaging. His research interests and over 200 publications centered on the radiology of the hand, growth and development, and dysmorpholgy.

andrew k. poznanski

Preston_2014

R. JULIAN PRESTON

Preston_2014

recently retired as the Associate Director for Health for the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). He also served as Director of the Environmental Carcinogenesis Division at EPA and as senior science adviser at the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology. He has been employed at the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and has served as associate director for the Oak Ridge–University of Tennessee Graduate School for Biomedical Sciences. Dr. Preston's research and current activities have focused on the mechanisms of radiation and chemical carcinogenesis and the approaches for incorporating these types of data into cancer risk assessments.

Dr. Preston was chair of Committee 1 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), a member of the ICRP Main Commission, and a member of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. He is an associate editor of Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis, Mutation Research, Chemico-Biological Interactions, and Health Physics. Dr. Preston has had more than 200 peer-reviewed papers and chapters published. He received his BA and MA from Peterhouse, Cambridge University, England, in genetics and his PhD from Reading University, England, in radiation genetics. He has served on the National Research Council's Committee to Assess the Scientific Information for the Radiation Exposure Screening and Education Program and the Task Group on the Biological Effects of Space Radiation.

r. julian preston

PuskinJ

JEROME S. PUSKIN

PuskinJ

is the Director for the Center of Science and Technology in the Radiation Protection Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). He has been at EPA since 1985, heading a group with responsibility for developing models for EPA's assessment of radiation doses and risks. From 1982 to 1998, he worked on similar issues at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Prior to this, he was first a Postdoctoral Fellow and then a faculty member in the Department of Radiation Biology and Biophysics at the University of Rochester, where he performed research on ion transport into mitochondria and ion binding to phospholipid membranes. His academic degrees include a BA from Johns Hopkins and a PhD from Harvard, both in Physics. He has represented EPA on a number of interagency committees, including a committee established to advise on health protection measures for the U.S. population after Chernobyl and the Executive Committees for the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination and the Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research.

He served on the scientific committee (SC) for NCRP Report No. 160, Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States and is currently a member of the NCRP SC 1-20, which is addressing the issue of enhanced relative biological effectiveness for low-energy photons and electrons. He was also a member of a committee of experts who developed the "Late Health Effects Uncertainty Assessment" component for the Probability Accident Consequence Uncertainty Analysis, a joint report of NRC and the Commission of the European Communities.

jerome s. puskin

Roessler GS Genevieve S. Roessler

Rosenstein

MARVIN ROSENSTEIN

Rosenstein

is a consultant, currently concentrating on the preparation of scientific reports produced by NCRP in all subject areas. From 1982 to 1995, he was Director, Office of Health Physics at the Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration. He also served in a number of scientific and management positions related to radiation protection during his 33 y career as a Commissioned Officer in the U.S. Public Health Service, from 1962 to 1995. He received a BS in Chemical Engineering (University of Maryland, 1961), an MS in Environmental Engineering (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1966) and a PhD in Nuclear Engineering (University of Maryland, 1971). His technical work has concentrated on radiation dosimetry, particularly with regard to x rays used for medical diagnosis, epidemiological studies of exposed populations, and public radiation emergencies.

He is a Distinguished Emeritus Member of NCRP (after serving as a Council member for 18 y), and an Emeritus member of Committee 3 (Protection in Medicine) of the International Commission on Radiological Protection [after serving on Committee 3 for 28 y (1985 to 2013)]. He was also a member of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements report committee that produced Report 74, Patient Dosimetry for X Rays Used in Medical Imaging.

marvin rosenstein

Rothenberg L Lawrence N. Rothenberg

Royal H Henry D. Royal

Ryan M

MICHAEL T. RYAN

Ryan M

is an independent consultant in radiological sciences and health physics. He is an Adjunct Faculty member at Vanderbilt University in the Department of Environmental Engineering and the Texas A&M University in the Department of Nuclear Engineering. He was previously an Associate Professor in the Department of Health Administration and Policy at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). He earned his BS in radiological health physics from Lowell Technological Institute in 1974. In 1976, he earned an MS in radiological sciences and protection from the University of Lowell under a U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration Scholarship. Dr. Ryan received the PhD in 1982 from the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he was recently inducted into the Academy of Distinguished Alumni. He is a recipient of the Francis Cabot Lowell Distinguished Alumni for Arts and Sciences Award for the University of Massachusetts Lowell.

Dr. Ryan is Editor In Chief of Health Physics. In 1989, he received the Health Physics Society (HPS) Elda E. Anderson Award, which is awarded each year to the one young member who has demonstrated excellence in research, discovery, and/or significant contribution to the field of health physics. Dr. Ryan has held numerous offices in HPS, including President of the Environmental Section and the Savannah River Chapter. Dr. Ryan served on the Technical Advisory Radiation Control Council for the State of South Carolina for 19 y. He is a member of NCRP. He has served as Scientific Vice President for Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management and Chair of Scientific Committee 87 and a member of the Board of Directors. Dr. Ryan is certified in the comprehensive practice of health physics by the American Board of Health Physics. In additional to his adjunct appointment at Texas A&M University, Dr. Ryan has taught radiation protection courses on the undergraduate and graduate level at the University of South Carolina and the College of Charleston. In addition, Dr. Ryan has authored and coauthored many refereed articles and publications in the areas of environmental radiation assessment, radiation dosimetry, and regulatory compliance for radioactive materials.

Dr. Ryan is active in his consultancy with a number of national corporations and government agencies. This work generally involves radioactive waste management, radiological health and regulatory compliance for workplace and environmental issues. He most recently served for several years on the independent review panel for decommissioning wok at Brookhaven National Laboratories. He completed a 9 y term as Chairman of the External Advisory Board for Radiation Protection at Sandia National Laboratories in 2007. He is a member of a similar external review board for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. He completed 8 y of service on the Scientific Review Group appointed by the Assistant Secretary of Energy to review the ongoing research in health effects at the former weapons complex sites in the Southern Urals. He has also served on several committees of the National Academy of Sciences producing reports regarding radioactive waste management topics. He also served as Chairman for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste and Materials. Dr. Ryan has served on Committee since 2002 until it was merged with the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) in 2008. In June, 2008, Dr. Ryan became a member of the ACRS.

Prior to his appointment at MUSC, Dr. Ryan was served as Vice President of Barnwell Operations for Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc., and had overall responsibility for operation of the low-level radioactive waste disposal and service facilities in Barnwell, South Carolina. Dr. Ryan's area of responsibility included management of a scientific, technical, and support staff; and implementation of the scientific programs to assure the safe and compliant operation of the company's low-level radioactive waste processing and disposal facilities. These programs included facility operations and implementation of policy and procedures for operation, environmental monitoring and regulatory compliance. Prior to this assignment Dr. Ryan served since 1988 as the Vice President of Regulatory Affairs, having responsibility for developing and implementing the company's regulatory compliance policies and programs to comply with state and federal regulators. Before joining Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc., as Director of the Environmental and Dosimetry Laboratory in 1983, Dr. Ryan spent 7 y in environmental health physics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

michael t. ryan

Schull William J. Schull

Seltzer

STEPHEN M. SELTZER

Seltzer

is a Guest Researcher in the Dosimetry Group of the Ionizing Radiation and Biomedical Physics Division at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). He joined NIST (then the National Bureau of Standards) in 1962. Working with Martin Berger, he co-developed one of the first Monte-Carlo calculations for coupled electron-photon transport to be applied in the energy of interest in medical physics and space-radiation effects. In addition to the development of mathematical methods and techniques for calculation of the transport of ionizing radiation through extended media, his career has focused heavily on the development and critical evaluation of pertinent cross-section information for photon, electron, positron, proton, and alpha-particle interactions with matter.

His algorithms and radiation-interaction data are used in nearly all current Monte-Carlo calculations for radiation transport. In nearly 200 publications, he has addressed various application areas in the radiological sciences, including, theoretical dosimetry, response of radiation detectors, auroral physics, space-radiation shielding, and radiation-source characterization. He served as the Director of the NIST Photon and Charged-Particle Data Center from 1988 until 2010. In 1994 he became Leader of the Radiation Interactions and Dosimetry Group, NIST Ionizing Radiation Division, responsible for the U.S. national measurement standards for the dosimetry of ionizing radiation (gamma rays, x rays, electrons, etc.), from which he retired in 2010. He has served on numerous national and international committees and advisory bodies. In 1997 he was elected to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) on which he served until 2012, and remains the ICRU Scientific Editor and an active consultant. In 1998 he was elected to NCRP.

Among other awards, he received the Department of Commerce Bronze Medal in 1983, their Silver Medal in 1999, was elevated to a Fellow of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine in 2009, was inducted as a NIST Distinguished Scientist in 2012, and in 2014 received the Randall S. Caswell Award for Distinguished Achievement in the Field of Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards from the Council on Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards.

stephen m. seltzer

ROY E. SHORE

was a Professor and Chief of the Epidemiology Division at New York University School of Medicine before going to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) in Hiroshima-Nagasaki as Vice Chairman and Chief of Research. He is an author of ~100 radiation-related publications and is currently working with other RERF investigators on studies of radiation and various diseases.

He has served on numerous governmental and scholarly committees, including as a long-time member of the International Commission on Radiological Protection and NCRP, and has served on various committees or task groups for the United Nations Scientfic Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, the World Health Organization, the National Academy of Sciences, the National Cancer Institute, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, among others. His interests include the effects of radiation on both cancer and noncancer disease incidence, and understanding the epidemiologic and biological modification of radiation effects by various environmental, genetic and age factors.

roy e. shore

Slovic P

PAUL SLOVIC

Slovic P

Paul Slovic is a professor of psychology at the University of Oregon and a founder and President of Decision Research. He holds a BA from Stanford University (1959) and an MA (1962) and PhD (1964) from the University of Michigan. He studies human judgment, decision making, and the psychology of risk. His most recent work examines "psychic numbing" and the failure to respond to mass human tragedies. He and his colleagues worldwide have developed methods to describe risk perceptions and measure their impacts on individuals, industry and society. He publishes extensively and serves as a consultant to industry and government. His most recent books include The Perception of Risk (2000), The Social Amplification of Risk (2003), The Construction of Preference (2006) and The Feeling of Risk (2010).

Dr. Slovic is a past President of the Society for Risk Analysis and in 1991 received its Distinguished Contribution Award. In 1993 he received the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award from the American Psychological Association and in 1995 the Outstanding Contribution to Science Award from the Oregon Academy of Science. He has received honorary doctorates from the Stockholm School of Economics (1996) and the University of East Anglia (2005).

paul slovic

Strom DJ

DANIEL J. STROM

Strom DJ

is Staff Scientist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Adjunct Associate Professor of Environmental Science at Washington State University Tri-Cities. He earned a BS and an MS in physics at the University of Connecticut, and a PhD in Radiological Hygiene from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1984. He was certified by the American Board of Health Physics in 1980, chaired the Part II Panel of Examiners for the 1993 Exam, and served on the American Academy of Health Physics board of directors. Dr. Strom's work experience includes over 5 y as a medical and academic radiation safety officer; 8 y as a faculty member in health physics at the university of Pittsburgh; and more than 22 y as a staff scientist in radiological sciences at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. He was Associate Editor of Health Physics 1994 to 2003, a Fellow of the HPS since 2001, Director of HPS (2008 to 2011), and a Council member of NCRP starting in 2002 where he chaired the committee that wrote NCRP Report No. 146, Approaches to Risk Management at Radioactively Contaminated Sites, and led the assessment of doses from ubiquitous background for NCRP Report No. 160, Radiation Exposure of the U.S. Population.

Dr. Strom's active research interests include quantitative risk analysis for radiological and chemical hazards, models relating radiation and detriment (cancer and heritable ill-health), radiation doses from intakes of radionuclides (internal dosimetry), and applied statistical inference. His longstanding interest in radiation dose reconstruction led to work for National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health compensation decisions under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program, and as lead investigator for medical and internal doses, as well as for uncertainty, for the U.S. Department of Energy Mayak Worker dose reconstruction from 2006 to 2011. He was lead radiation protection design specialist for the Chornobyl Shelter Implementation Plan – Project Management Unit from 2011 to 2013.

daniel j. strom

TillJohn

JOHN E. TILL

TillJohn

is President of Risk Assessment Corporation. He is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and served in the U.S. Navy Nuclear Submarine Program and retired a Rear Admiral in the U.S. Naval Reserve in 1999. Dr. Till received an MS from Colorado State University in 1972 and a PhD from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1976. In 1977 Dr. Till formed Risk Assessment Corporation to perform research on radionuclides released to the environment by nuclear facilities. His career has focused on the development of methods to estimate dose and risk to humans from radionuclides and chemicals in the environment. He has served on committees for the National Academy of Sciences, the International Commission on Radiological Protection, and the International Atomic Energy Agency. He has published widely in the open literature including the first textbook on radiological risk assessment published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 1983 and an updated version, Radiological Risk Assessment and Environmental Analysis (2008).

In 1995, Dr. Till received the E.O. Lawrence Award from the U.S. Department of Energy in the field of Environmental Science and Technology. In addition to his scientific work, Dr. Till also owns and operates his family farm, growing corn and soybeans near Neeses, South Carolina.

john e. till

Lawrence W. Townsend

Lawrence W. Townsend

Townsend-Lis the Chancellor's Professor and Robert M. Condra Professor of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He has a BS in Physics from the U.S. Naval Academy, and an MS in Physics (experimental nuclear) from the Naval Postgraduate School. After obtaining his MS, he served for 7 y as a nuclear submarine engineer. After leaving the Navy, he obtained a PhD in Physics (theoretical nuclear) from the University of Idaho. After a short stint as a Research Assistant Professor of Physics at Old Dominion University, he became a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Research Scientist and Senior Research Scientist where his research has focused on nuclear interactions of cosmic rays and their implications for space radiation shielding and crew protection. For these efforts, he was awarded a NASA Scientific Achievement Medal. In 1995 he retired from NASA and entered academia at the University of Tennessee where he continues to do research on space radiation interactions, transport, and their effects. In 1998 he served as the Organizing Committee Chair for the NCRP Annual Meeting and was elected a Member of Council and was appointed as a Distinguished Emeritus Member of Council in 2010. He has served as a member of Scientific Committee 75, chair of Scientific Committee 1-7, and consultant for Scientific Committee 1-24 (phase I).

Lawrence W. Townsend

Ullrich R

ROBERT L. ULLRICH

Ullrich R

is currently Associate Director for Research at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. After obtaining his PhD at the University of Rochester, he joined Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1974 and served as Director of the Radiation Carcinogenesis Unit until 1989 when he became Vice Chair and Director of the Biology Division in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Texas Medical Branch. In 2001, he joined Colorado State University as Professor and Director of the Radiological Health Science and Cancer Research Program. In 2008 he moved back to the University of Texas Medical Branch where he served as the John Sealy Distinguished Chair in Cancer Biology, Professor and Director of the Sealy Center for Cancer Biology and most recently Director of the Cancer Center. His research over many years has focused on risks and mechanisms of radiation-induced cancer. Initially this work was on the dose-response relationships at low doses and dose rates for radiation-induced cancer in mice. Subsequently, his laboratory developed cell and molecular approaches to study mechanisms in the development of mammary cancer after radiation exposure.

His most recent work of has been funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to establish a Specialized Center of Research in Radiation Carcinogenesis with a focus of studying cancer risks and mechanisms of cancer development following exposure to the unique forms of radiation encountered during space travel. He has served on a number of scientific advisory groups both in the United States as well as internationally In the United States, Dr. Ullrich served on committees for the National Cancer Institute, the U.S. Department of Energy, NASA, NCRP, and the National Academies/National Research Council. Internationally he served on advisory committees including the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the European Commission, and the International Agency for Cancer Research. He is a member of several scientific societies including the American Association for Cancer Research and the Radiation Research Society (RRS). Most recently the RRS awarded him their highest honor, the Failla Medal, for significant contributions in the radiological sciences.

robert l. ullrich

Vetter

RICHARD J. VETTER

Vetter

is Professor Emeritus and former Radiation Safety Officer at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnosota. He received his BS and MS degrees in Biology from South Dakota State University and his PhD in Health Physics from Purdue University. He is board certified by the American Board of Health Physics and the American Board of Medical Physics. He served on the Purdue University faculty from 1970 to 1980 and the Mayo Clinic staff and faculty from 1980 to 2010. Dr. Vetter is a member of the National Academies Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board, the Government Liaison for the Health Physics Society (HPS), and a member of the Executive Council of the International Radiation Protection Association. He is a Fellow of HPS and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and received the HPS Founders Award.

He is past Editor-in-Chief of Health Physics, past president of HPS, past president of the American Academy of Health Physics, and author or coauthor of more than 220 publications, books, book chapters, and other articles. He served as Vice Chair of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Advisory Committee for Medical Uses of Isotopes and member of the Radiation Advisory Committee of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board. He served on the Board of Directors of NCRP, Chair of the NCRP Nominating Committee, and Chair of three and member of two NCRP scientific committees resulting in four NCRP reports and one NCRP statement. Dr. Vetter has received outstanding alumnus awards from South Dakota State University, the Purdue School of Pharmacy and Pharmacal Sciences, the Purdue School of Health Sciences, and the Purdue College of Health and Human Sciences.

richard j. vetter

Whicker W

F. WARD WHICKER

Whicker W

is Professor Emeritus at Colorado State University (CSU), where he taught graduate level courses in radioecology and radionuclide transport modeling for over 40 y. He and his graduate students conducted research in these fields, leading to the development of approximately 175 open literature publications, dozens of technical reports, many book chapters, and five books. His formal teaching extended to organizations such as the International Atomic Energy Agency, the International Union of Radioecologists, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In 1989 he founded the Par Pond Radioecology Laboratory at the Savannah River Site, where he spent 3 y studying the behavior of radionuclides in aquatic ecosystems. Dr. Whicker is regarded as one of the founders of radioecology, the field addressing the fate and effects of radioactivity in the environment. His early work on fallout radionuclides in ecosystems had implications for health effects in human, plant and animal populations. His research on the effects of ionizing radiation on plants and animals has contributed to the development of national and international guidelines for protecting the general environment from radioactive contamination. His work on radionuclide transport processes played a role in our understanding of mineral cycles and energy flows in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. He led the development of the PATHWAY foodchain transport model to predict internal doses from fallout radionuclides to residents of nine states near the Nevada Test Site. He also was a pioneer in using field measurement data to test the accuracy of computer models for prediction of radionuclide behavior in the environment.

Dr. Whicker also helped develop probabilistic uncertainty/sensitivity analysis in environmental transport and dose codes. His service to the NCRP includes the Board of Directors, Scientific Vice President, Council member, and member or chair of several committees. He has served on committees of the National Academy of Science/National Research Council in the area of environmental problems of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Weapons Complex. He has chaired national and international working groups and scientific writing teams, for example, for the International Atomic Energy Agency, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, and the NCRP. He has served on review panels for many organizations, consulted for private organizations, and is frequently called as an expert witness on litigation issues concerning radioactivity in the environment.

He served as Associate Editor for the Americas for the Journal of Environmental Radioactivity. His awards include the Sigma Xi CSU Chapter Honor Scientist, the CSU Glover Gallery of Distinguished Faculty, the Award for Significant Scientific Contributions from the Health Physics Society, the E. O. Lawrence Award from DOE, and the International Union of Radioecology's first V.I. Vernadsky Award. In "retirement," he guides mountain trips for the Colorado Mountain Club, and volunteers time to lecture and advise graduate students at CSU.

f. ward whicker

Wiltshire S

SUSAN D. WILTSHIRE

Wiltshire S

now retired, previously held the position of Vice President of the consulting firm JK Research Associates, Inc. Ms. Wiltshire has been involved in the development of public policy and technical reviews for more than 22 y. She has consulted in risk communication; supported multi-faceted decision-making; planned and implemented citizen involvement, and assisted in peer review processes, especially in the development of nuclear waste management policy. Her expertise in these areas results from her extensive experience as an involved citizen, consultant, local official, and member of numerous state and national advisory groups. She has served on study committees and advisory groups for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; the National Academy of Sciences, including the Board on Radioactive Waste; the U.S. Department of Energy; and NCRP. In addition, she has served on the NCRP Board of Directors and was elected a Distinguished Emeritus member in 2009.

Ms. Wiltshire is author of the Conservation Foundation Report Managing the Nation's High-Level Radioactive Waste and the 1993 revision of the League of Women Voters publication A Nuclear Waste Primer as well as of numerous papers and presentations concerning radioactive waste management and cleanup of the weapons complex.

susan d. wiltshire

Ziskin M

MARVIN C. ZISKIN

Ziskin M

is a Professor of Radiology and Medical Physics at Temple University Medical School, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He also is the Director of the Temple University Center for Biomedical Physics. Dr. Ziskin is a pioneer in the field of medical ultrasound. Starting in 1965, he has been involved with developing ultrasound as a useful diagnostic modality. All along, he has been particularly concerned with its safety, especially with respect to fetal imaging. He served for 20 y on the NCRP Scientific Committee (SC) 66, the committee, under Dr. Wesley Nyborg, that prepared the three authoritative NCRP volumes on the biological effects of ultrasound and exposure criteria for diagnostic ultrasound. Dr. Ziskin served as the President of the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine from 1982 to 1984 and as the President of the World Federation of Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology from 2003 to 2006. In the past 20 y, he has also been involved with the safety of nonionizing electromagnetic fields.

He serves as the Co-Chairman of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. (IEEE) International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety SC-4, the committee responsible for the IEEE standards on the safety of radiofrequency electromagnetic exposures. Dr. Ziskin has authored or co-authored seven books and over 250 scientific publications. He has received numerous awards, including the 2011 D'Arsonval Award, the highest award of the Bioelectromagnetics Society.

marvin c. ziskin

(as of March 7, 2017)

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Last modified: March 8, 2017