NCRP

2017 Council Members

Amundson-S

SALLY A. AMUNDSON

Amundson-S

is an associate professor of radiation oncology in the Center for Radiological Research at the Columbia University Medical Center in New York. She holds a doctorate in radiation biology and cancer biology from the Harvard School of Public Health. Her research uses functional genomics approaches to study low dose radiation and bystander effects, unique effects of space radiation, and the development of gene expression approaches for radiation biodosimetry.

She is co-director of the Center for High-Throughput Minimally-Invasive Radiation Biodosimetry. Prior to joining the group at Columbia, Dr. Amundson worked on molecular radiation biology in the Division of Basic Science at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), where she helped to develop global gene expression profiling techniques, and where she was an adjunct investigator in the NCI Radiation Epidemiology Branch. She has served on the NCRP since 2004 and on the Science Advisory Committee of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) in Hiroshima since 2009, chairing the RERF scientific review for 2012.

Dr. Amundson is an associate editor of Radiation Research, and has served on the organizing and program committees for numerous meetings, including two of the American Statistical Association Conferences on Radiation and Health, which aim to integrate radiation biology with epidemiology. She is a recipient of the Michael Fry Research Award from the Radiation Research Society (RRS), and she is also a member of the RRS Council.

sally a. amundson

Ansari

ARMIN ANSARI

Ansari

is the Radiological Assessment Team Lead at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) serving as subject matter expert in CDC’s radiation emergency preparedness and response activities. He received his BS and PhD degrees in radiation biophysics from the University of Kansas, starting his career as a radiation biologist, and did his postdoctoral research in radiation-induced mutagenesis at Oak Ridge and Los Alamos National Laboratories. He was a senior scientist with the radiological consulting firm of Auxier & Associates before joining CDC in 2002. He has led the development of key national guidance documents including guides for population monitoring and operation of public shelters after radiation emergencies and a number of training products for public health professionals. He is a past president of the Health Physics Society, adjunct associate professor of nuclear and radiological engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology, member of Georgia East Metro Medical Reserve Corps and Gwinnett County Community Emergency Response Team, and provides consultancy to the International Atomic Energy Agency. Since 2014, he has served as member of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. He is the author of Radiation Threats and Your Safety: A Guide to Preparation and Response for Professionals and Community, a book specifically directed at audiences without radiation protection expertise.

armin ansari

Kimberly E. Applegate

Kimberly E. Applegate

ApplegateK_2

is a professor of radiology and pediatrics and director of practice quality improvement in radiology at Emory University in Atlanta. At Emory University, she chairs the Radiation Control Council which reviews policy, clinical and research activities involving the use of ionizing radiation. Kimberly is dedicated to service in organized radiology—she is the President of the Association for University Radiologists (AUR) Research and Education Foundation, Past President of AUR, and served on multiple medical boards and editorial boards. Dr. Applegate has published over 140 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters, and presented scientific papers and lectures at medical and scientific assemblies around the world. In 2007, Dr. Applegate was elected to both the NCRP and the Steering Committee of the American College of Radiology (ACR), and began work on the initial Steering Committee for the Image Gently® Campaign to reduce radiation exposure in children. The Campaign has received a number of awards and collaborates internationally to change imaging practice. She is the national and international outreach chair for this campaign. In 2010, she co-edited the book “Evidence-Based Imaging in Pediatrics” to promote appropriate use of medical imaging in infants and children. Most recently, she co-authored the ICRP Publication 121, Radiological Protection of Paediatric Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology. She has long had an interest in the development of imaging guidelines, chairing this process for ACR, and collaborating with the World Health Organization and the International Atomic Energy Agency on international guideline development. Dr. Applegate is the ACR Vice Speaker and member of its Executive Committee.

kimberly e. applegate

Apostoaei-I

A. IULIAN APOSTOAEI

Apostoaei-I

is a researcher at SENES Oak Ridge, Inc., Center for Risk Analysis, Oak Ridge, Tennessee and an adjunct professor in Nuclear Engineering Department at the University of Tennessee, in Knoxville, Tennessee. He has more 20 y of experience in various aspects of radiological assessment. He served on the NCRP scientific committee in charge of the NCRP Report No. 164 on Uncertainties in Internal Radiation Dose Assessment. In support of epidemiologic studies performed by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Dr. Apostoaei has developed computational tools for estimation of doses from intakes of plutonium and uranium by analysis of bioassay data, using the most recent International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) models.

Dr. Apostoaei was involved in the historical dose reconstruction project for members of the public at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, sponsored by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. He also contributed to the reconstruction of doses and estimation of risk of cancer for individuals exposed to historic releases of 131I from the Oak Ridge Reservation, as well as the estimation of radiation doses and risk of cancer from exposure to various radionuclides released to the Columbia River from Hanford Nuclear Facilities and to the Clinch River from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As part of these projects, Dr. Apostoaei determined the uncertainties in doses per unit intake from ingestion of 131I, 137Cs, 106Ru, and 60Co by using the most recent ICRP biokinetic and dosimetric models and developed risk coefficients for estimation of risk of thyroid and other cancers.

Dr. Apostoaei participated in the update of the Radioepidemiological Tables for the Radiation Epidemiology Branch of the National Cancer Institute, and is one of the main authors of the Interactive Radio-Epidemiological Program (IREP). IREP is currently used to estimate the probability of cancer causation for nuclear workers from exposure to radiation.

Dr. Apostoaei has been involved in various international projects for testing radiological assessment models using Chernobyl accident data, under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency and has participated in validation exercises for dosimetry and environmental transport models applied to reconstruction of 137Cs doses to people from Czech Republic and Finland exposed in the aftermath of Chernobyl accident, and 131I dose to individuals exposed to releases from the Hanford Nuclear Facility.

a. iulian apostoaei

Azzam-E

EDOUARD I. AZZAM

Azzam-E

Edouard I. Azzam is Professor in the Department of Radiology at Rutgers University - New Jersey Medical School. He received his doctoral degree in the field of radiation biology from the University of Ottawa (Canada) in 1995. From 1995 to 2000, he pursued post-doctoral studies at the Harvard School of Public Health under the mentorship of Professor John B. Little.

His research program has focused on elucidating the mechanisms underlying the biological effects of low doses/low fluences of ionizing radiations that differ in their biophysical characteristics. The goal is to elucidate the role of intercellular communication and oxidative metabolism in radiation-induced nontargeted effects and adaptive responses. The outcome of these investigations may be significant towards reducing the uncertainty associated with current models for predicting the long-term health risks of exposure to radiation. His studies have been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the U.S. Department of Energy; and they have resulted in the training of numerous students and post-doctoral fellows who remain engaged in unraveling the biochemical events underlying the responses of human cells to ionizing radiation.

edouard i. azzam

BaderJ

JUDITH L. BADER

BaderJ

has a BA from Stanford University and an MD from Yale University School of Medicine. She has been board certified in Pediatrics, Pediatric Hematology-Oncology and Radiation Oncology. She is the author of scores of publications in various disciplines including clinical cancer trials, genetics and epidemiology, computer usability technology, and planning for and responding to mass casualty radiation emergencies. Dr. Bader was a Senior Investigator in many cancer clinical trials, genetics and epidemiology research projects, and communications technologies projects during her 22 y in the U.S. Public Health Service at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health. She has been the Chief of the Clinical Radiation Branch of the Radiation Oncology Branch at NCI, Chief of Radiation Oncology at the Bethesda Naval Hospital (now Walter Reed), and founding physician of two private radiation oncology practices. Since 2004, Dr. Bader has also served as a Senior Medical Advisor to various U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and interagency entities charged with planning for and responding to medical aspects of mass casualty radiation emergencies. She is the Founding and Managing Editor of the HHS/Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response-sponsored website Radiation Emergency Medical Management (REMM – https://www.remm.nlm.gov). She has served on various committees for the American Society for Clinical Oncology and the American Society for Radiation Oncology.

judith l. bader

Balter Stephen Balter

Barnett D

DANIEL J. BARNETT

Barnett D

is an Associate Professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He has a Joint Faculty appointment in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the school. He is affiliated with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded Johns Hopkins Center for Public Health Preparedness.

His research interests include best practice models to enhance all-hazards public health emergency preparedness and response, with a strong interest in preparedness for radiological and nuclear terrorism threats. Specific areas of focus include willingness of health providers to respond to public health emergencies, risk communication; personal and family emergency preparedness planning, vulnerable populations in emergencies, and psychosocial impacts of disasters. He received a BA in English from Yale University, and his MD degree at the Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health; his MPH degree was earned at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and he is a graduate of the Johns Hopkins General Preventive Medicine Residency Program.

daniel j. barnett

Bernstein

JONINE BERNSTEIN

Bernstein

is an Attending Epidemiologist at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York City. Her core research focus is on breast cancer and gliomas and on understanding cancer risk and progression in order to identify those at highest risk because of gene carrier status, environmental exposures, or a combination of both. Dr. Bernstein is the Principle Investigator of the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded international 24-center Women's Environmental Cancer Radiation and Epidemiologic (WECARE) Study which was specifically designed to examine the interaction of radiation exposure and genetic predisposition in breast cancer, especially radiation-associated contralateral breast cancer (CBC) among 3,700 women with CBC and unilateral breast cancer. The WECARE Study has served as the source population for studies of candidate genes such as BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, and ATM, candidate gene pathways of DNA damage response involved in radiation-induced double-strand break repair—ATM, CHEK2, P53 binding protein (53BPI), and MDC1, Mre11, Rad50, and Nbs1 (e.g., MRN nuclease complex), a genome-wide association study, and most recently mammographic density. The global hypothesis across these studies is that women who carry certain types of mutations will be more susceptible to breast cancer than noncarriers, and possibly to radiation-associated breast cancer.

Dr. Bernstein currently serves as a member of the Board of Directors of the American College of Epidemiology, the External Advisory group for the NCI-sponsored Breast Cancer Family Registry, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, and most recently the NCI Board of Scientific Counselors-Clinical Sciences and Epidemiology. For the past two years, she has served on the Organizing Committee of the American Statistical Association Conference on Radiation and Health (2012 and 2014 meetings), and was Co-Chair of the Third North American Congress of Epidemiology, held in June 2011 for which she was honored by the 2012 ACE Award for Leadership and Service in Epidemiology. Dr. Bernstein holds a PhD in Epidemiology from Yale University, an MS in Applied Biometry from the University of Southern California, and an AB from Brown University. Before joining the faculty at MSKCC, she was Deputy Director of the Division of Epidemiology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

jonine bernstein

BlakelyE

ELEANOR A. BLAKELY

BlakelyE

is a Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Senior Staff Biophysicist with over 40 y of professional experience in molecular, cellular and animal radiobiological research directed at studying the basic mechanisms of radiation responses, with an emphasis on charged particle radiation effects. She also holds a Faculty Affiliate Appointment in the Department of Radiological Health Sciences at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado and is a Clinical Professor of Radiation Medicine (nontenured) at Loma Linda University, School of Medicine, Loma Linda, California. Dr. Blakely earned a PhD in Physiology from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana as a U.S. Atomic Energy Commission Special Fellow in Radiation Science and Protection. Her professional activities have included service on advisory panels for several hospitals, universities, and numerous federal agencies including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); on Editorial Boards for several journals: Space Power, Radiation Research, Journal of Radiation Research, and NPJ Microgravity; Appointed Member, Diagnostic Radiology Study Section-Division of Research Grants, NIH; Advisory Committee Member, International Atomic Energy Agency; Scientific Director, NASA Space Research Summer School; and Elected Officer of the Radiation Research Society: Biology Councilor and Secretary-Treasurer.

In 2000 she was elected to NCRP, and has served on Scientific Committee (SC) 75 that produced NCRP Report No. 132, Radiation Protection Guidance for Activities in Low-Earth Orbit; and SC 1-7 that produced NCRP Report No. 153, Information Needed to Make Radiation Protection Recommendations for Space Missions Beyond Low-Earth Orbit. She has received several awards including the Robert Emerson Graduate Teaching Award, School of Life Sciences, University of Illinois, the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Outstanding Performance Award, the DOE Office of Science Outstanding Mentor Award, the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Technology Transfer Award, and an RD100 award from Research and Development Magazine. In 2011, she was named the 35th NCRP Lauriston S. Taylor Lecturer. She serves as consultant in support of clinical radiotherapy trials, and of issues pertinent to radiation protection. In 2014 she was awarded the Martin Schneider Memorial Lectureship, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas. In June 2015 she retired after 40 y at LBNL, but was rehired by LBNL in October 2015, and continues to work part-time. In November 2015 she received the Berkeley Laboratory Director's Award for Exceptional Achievement: the Berkeley Lab Citation Award.

eleanor a. blakely

Blakely W

WILLIAM F. BLAKELY

Blakely W

is a Senior Staff Scientist in the Radiation Biodosimetry Research Program at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS). He received his BA in Zoology in 1974 at San Diego State University and PhD in Radiation Biology in 1980 at the University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign under the supervision of his doctoral advisor, Dr. Howard S. Ducoff. He completed his postdoctorate study on DNA radiation chemistry in Dr. John F. Ward's laboratory at the University of California, San Diego. In 1983 he joined AFRRI/USUHS, his present affiliation. Dr. Blakely's research activities have focused on molecular mechanisms of radiation sensitivity, cell-cycle effects, DNA damage and repair, and biological dosimetry. He served as a guest editor for several issues of journals associated with international meetings, an associate editor for the Radiation Research, and Chairman of the NATO Research Study Group-Radiation Bioeffects and Countermeasures. He presently is the course director of the Radiation Biology graduate course at his University.

He also serves as a U.S. representative on the ISO TC85/SC2 (Radiation Protection) Working Group 18 (Performance Criteria for Service Laboratories Performing Biological Dosimetry by Cytogenetics), an assistant professor in the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences Preventive Medicine and Biometrics Department, and an senior associate faculty at Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site. Elected as a Council member in 2003 and is currently serving a second 6 y term. He served as the Program Chair of NCRP 2004 Annual Meeting entitled: Advances in Consequence Management for Radiological Terrorism Events and is currently a member of NCRP PAC 6 - Dosimetry.

william f. blakely

BlumenthalD

DANIEL J. BLUMENTHAL

BlumenthalD

manages the Consequence Management programs in the Office of Emergency Response at the National Nuclear Security Administration within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The programs include atmospheric dispersion modeling, air and ground-based radiation monitoring, and radiation medicine. In 2009, he transferred from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Domestic Nuclear Detection Office where he was the Chief Test Scientist. He was responsible for designing and conducting field test campaigns for radiation detection systems as applied to the preventive radiological/nuclear detection mission as well as providing subject matter expertise on detector applications and performance. Prior to joining the Federal government he was a Senior Scientist at DOE's Remote Sensing Laboratory from 1996 to 2006 where he managed or provided scientific support to several DOE emergency response teams. Most recently Dr. Blumenthal led the initial DOE response team to Japan where he spent a total of seven weeks following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011. Since then he has supported many U.S. and international efforts related to lessons learned from Fukushima. These include documenting best practices associated with data management during an international response and writing the occupational dose section of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Fukushima Report.

Dr. Blumenthal's background is in nuclear physics – gamma-ray and charged particle spectroscopy. He received his undergraduate degree in physics from Columbia College in 1985 and his doctorate in nuclear physics from Yale University in 1994. He did a post-doctoral fellowship at Argonne National Laboratory from 1994 to 1996. He became an Certified Health Physicist in 2003.

daniel j. blumenthal

BoiceJ

JOHN D. BOICE, JR.

BoiceJ

is the President of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), Bethesda, Maryland, and Professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee. He is an international authority on radiation effects and currently serves on the Main Commission of the International Commission on Radiological Protection and as a U.S. advisor to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. During 27 y of service in the U.S. Public Health Service, Dr. Boice developed and became the first chief of the Radiation Epidemiology Branch at the National Cancer Institute.

Dr. Boice has established programs of research in all major areas of radiation epidemiology, with major projects dealing with populations exposed to medical, occupational, military and environmental radiation. These research efforts have aimed at clarifying cancer and other health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, especially at low-dose levels. Boice's seminal discoveries and over 460 publications have been used to formulate public health measures to reduce population exposure to radiation and prevent radiation-associated diseases.

He has delivered the Laurison S. Taylor Lecture at the NCRP and the Fessinger-Springer Lecture at the University of Texas at El Paso. In 2008, Dr. Boice received the Harvard School of Public Health Alumni Award of Merit. He has also received the E.O. Lawrence Award from the Department of Energy — an honor bestowed on Richard Feynman and Murray Gell-Mann among others — and the Gorgas Medal from the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States. In 1999 he received the outstanding alumnus award from the University of Texas at El Paso (formerly Texas Western College). Dr. Boice directs the Million U.S. Radiation Workers and Veterans Study to examine the lifetime risk of cancer following relatively low-dose exposures received gradually over time.

john d. boice, jr.

bolch

WESLEY E. BOLCH

is Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics in the J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Florida (UF). He serves as Director of the Advanced Laboratory for Radiation Dosimetry Studies at UF. Dr. Bolch earned his BSE degree in environmental engineering in 1984, his ME and PhD degrees in radiological physics in 1986 and 1998, respectively, from the University of Florida. He has been certified by the American Board of Health Physics since 1994 and licensed in Radiological Health Engineering by the Texas Board of Professional Engineers since 1992. In 2011, Dr. Bolch was elected Fellow of both the Health Physics Society and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. He has been a member of the Society of Nuclear Medicine’s Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee since 1993, a member of NCRP since 2005, and a member of Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) since 2005. Within the latter, he serves as C2 Secretary and Leader of the ICRP Task Group on Computational Phantoms and Radiation Transport. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed journal articles, co-authored/edited 14 books/book chapters, and served as author on two NCRP reports, two ICRP publications, and two MIRD monographs.

Dr. Bolch has managed a broad research program including (1) National Institutes of Health (NIH) and U.S. Department of Energy funded projects to construct high-resolution models of the skeleton to support dose-response studies in radionuclide therapy and radiation epidemiology; (2) NIH funded projects to develop scalable NURBS-based and voxel-based computational phantoms of adult and pediatric patients and associated software for organ dose assessment in nuclear medicine, computed tomography, interventional fluoroscopy, and radiotherapy; (3) private company funded projects to develop stereotactic kilovoltage x-ray treatments for age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma; and (4) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded projects in stochastic modeling of worker inhalation and gamma-ray exposures following radiological accidents and potential terrorist events. He is the recipient of the 2014 Distinguish Scientific Achievement Award by the Health Physics Society acknowledging outstanding contributions to the science and technology of radiation safety.

wesley e. bolch

Boyd M

MICHAEL BOYD

Boyd M

is a senior health physicist in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air/Radiation Protection Division (RPD) and has been with EPA since 1988. As a member of RPD's Center for Science and Technology, Mr. Boyd manages the development of new federal guidance documents. He is also the co-chair of the Federal Guidance Subcommittee of the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS). Mr. Boyd is a recently elected member of the International Commission on Radiological Protection Committee 4. He chairs the Health Physics Society's International Collaboration Committee and is on the Bureau of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency's Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health. He has a BS in Biology and MS in Public Health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

michael boyd

Brey R

RICHARD R. BREY

Brey R

Professor of Health Physics, Chair Department of Nuclear Engineering and Health Physics, Director of the Idaho State University (ISU) Health Physics Program. Dr. Richard Brey received his PhD from Purdue University in Health Physics in 1994. He was the recipient of the Elda E. Anderson Award in 2002. He has engaged in a wide variety of research varying from radiation physics and detection to agricultural applications of radiation and radiation producing machines, this list importantly includes internal dosimetry; in which he has engaged in various collaborative efforts including the evaluation of historical exposures, evaluation of animal experimental data, and redefining/evaluating radioactive material translocation models. Since 1995 Dr. Brey has been the director of an environmental radioanalytical laboratory which performs approximately 1,200 sample analyses per quarter. Over the years he has served as the Director of the ISU Technical Safety Office and University Radiation Safety Officer as well as in other administrative and technical positions

richard r. brey

Brink

JAMES A. BRINK

Brink

is Radiologist-in-Chief at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). He earned a BS degree in Electrical Engineering at Purdue University and an MD at Indiana University before completing his residency and fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital. He joined the faculty at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology at Washington University School of Medicine where he rose to the rank of Associate Professor prior to joining the faculty at Yale University in 1997. Promoted to Professor in 2001, Dr. Brink was appointed Interim Chair in 2003 and Chair of the Yale Department of Diagnostic Radiology in 2006.

On February 1, 2013, Dr. Brink left Yale to serve as Radiologist-in-Chief at MGH. While he has broad experience in medical imaging, including utilization and management of imaging resources, he has particular interest and expertise in issues related to the monitoring and control of medical radiation exposure. Dr. Brink is a fellow of the Society for Computed Body Tomography/Magnetic Resonance and a fellow of the American College of Radiology (ACR). For ACR, he serves on the Executive Committee and Board of Chancellors as Chair of the Body Imaging Commission, Chair of the Imaging Communication Network, and Co-Chair of the Global Summit on Radiology Quality and Safety. For the American Roentgen Ray Society, Dr. Brink is a member of the Executive Council and immediate Past President.

For NCRP, Dr. Brink is the Scientific Vice President for Radiation Protection in Medicine, and chaired the NCRP scientific committee that defined diagnostic reference levels for medical imaging in the United States (NCRP Report No. 172, 2012). For the International Society of Radiology, Dr. Brink serves as Chair of the International Commission for Radiology Education, and for the Radiological Society of North America, he serves as Co-Chair of the Image Wisely® initiative, a social marketing campaign to increase awareness about adult radiation protection in medicine.

james a. brink

Buddemeier B

BROOKE R. BUDDEMEIER

Buddemeier B

is an associate program leader in the Global Security Directorate of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). He supports the Risk and Consequence Management Division in their efforts to evaluate the potential risk and consequence of radiological and nuclear terrorism. Mr. Buddemeier is a member of NCRP and served on the scientific committees which developed Commentary No. 19 - Key Elements of Preparing Emergency Responders for Nuclear and Radiological Terrorism (2005) and NCRP Report No. 165 – Responding to a Radiological or Nuclear Terrorism Incident: A Guide for Decision Makers (2010).

From 2003 through 2007, he was on assignment with the Department of Homeland Security's as the weapons of mass destruction emergency response and consequence management program manager for Science and Technology's emergency preparedness and response portfolio. He supported Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Homeland Security Operations Center as a radiological emergency response subject matter expert. He also facilitated the department's research, development, test and evaluation process to improve emergency response through better capabilities, protocols and standards. Prior to that, he was part of the LLNL Nuclear Counterterrorism Program and coordinated LLNL's involvement in the National Nuclear Security Administration's Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) for California, Nevada and Hawaii.

RAP is a national emergency response resource that assists federal, state and local authorities in the event of a radiological incident. As part of RAP's outreach efforts, Mr. Buddemeier has provided radiological responder training and instrumentation workshops to police, firefighters, and members of other agencies throughout the nation and abroad. He has also provided operational health physics support for various radiochemistry, plutonium handling, accelerator and dosimetry operations. He is Certified Health Physicist who received his Master's in Radiological Health Physics from San Jose State University and a BS in Nuclear Engineering from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

brooke r. buddemeier

Bushberg-J

JERROLD T. BUSHBERG

Bushberg-J

is the Senior Vice President of NCRP, and Clinical Professor of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, University of California (UC) Davis School of Medicine. He is an expert on the biological effects, safety, and interactions of ionizing and nonionizing radiation and holds multiple radiation detection technology patents. Dr. Bushberg is an elected fellow of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the Health Physics Society. He is certified by several national professional boards with specific subspecialty certification in radiation protection and medical physics and currently serves as a Director of the American Board of Medical Physics. Dr. Bushberg was awarded the Warren K. Sinclair Medal for Excellence in Radiation Science by NCRP in 2014. Prior to coming to the UC Davis Health System as technical director of Nuclear Medicine, Dr. Bushberg was on the faculty of Yale University School of Medicine where his research was focused on radiopharmaceutical development.

Dr. Bushberg has served as an advisor to government agencies and institutions throughout the nation and around the world on the biological effects and safety of ionizing and nonionizing radiation exposure. He has worked for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the World Health Organization, and the International Atomic Energy Agency as a subject matter expert in radiation protection and radiological emergency medical management. Dr. Bushberg has responsibility for medical postgraduate education in medical physics, radiation (ionizing and nonionizing) protection, and radiation biology. The third edition of the textbook "The Essential Physics of Medical Imaging," authored by Bushberg, Seibert, Leidholdt, and Boone, is used extensively by radiology residency programs throughout the United States.

jerrold t. bushberg

Polly Y. Chang Polly Y. Chang

Mary E. Clark

Mary E. Clark

Clark-Mhas served 28 y in the profession of radiological health at the state and federal level, having served both on the staff of and as Chief of the Florida Office of Radiation Control from 1986 to 1993, and as Chief of the Environmental Engineering and Radiological Assessment Branch and Assistant Director for Science and Science Advisor for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Radiation and Indoor Air from 1993 to 2014.

Mary E. Clark

Coleman-N

C. Norman Coleman

Coleman-N

received his BA in mathematics, summa cum laude, from the University of Vermont in 1966 and his MD from Yale University in 1970. He is board certified in three specialties — internal medicine from University of California, San Francisco; medical oncology from the National Cancer Institute; and radiation oncology from Stanford University. He served in the U.S. Public Health Service at the National Institutes of Health [O-4 (ret)]. He was Assistant and tenured Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology and Medical Oncology at Stanford and from 1985 to 1999 and Professor and Chairman of the Harvard Medical School Joint Center for Radiation Therapy. Since 1999, he has been Associate Director, Radiation Research Program and Senior Investigator, with a molecular radiation therapeutics laboratory in the Radiation Oncology Branch of National Cancer Institute. Since 2004 he has also been a Senior Medical Advisor in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. His focus is on radiological and nuclear preparedness and planning but the programs apply to all-hazards. This includes the Scarce Resources for a Nuclear Detonation project and participation at the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo during the Japan disaster in March 2011. Among his honors are Fellowships in American College of Physicians, American College of Radiology, American Society of Radiation Oncology, and American Society of Clinical Oncology. He is recipient of an Honorary Fellowship, Royal College of Surgeons, Dublin; Honorary Fellow, Royal College of Radiologists (London); the Gold Medal from the American Society for Radiation Oncology; and the 2011 Samuel J. Heyman, Service to America Homeland Security Medal. In 2015 the University of Vermont awarded him a Doctor of Science (honoris causa) for his public service and contributions to society.

c. norman coleman

Cool D

DONALD A. COOL

Cool D

received his Masters and Doctorate degrees in Radiation Biology from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. He is currently the Technical Executive for Radiation Safety at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and provides advice on EPRI Low Dose Radiation research and the Radiation Safety Program. Dr. Cool retired from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) after more than 32 y of service. At NRC, he was responsible for coordinating the wide range of international activities related to radiation protection, safety, and security of byproduct materials; decommissioning and waste management; radiation protection policy; and international standards, and had previously served in various senior management positions including Director, Division of Industrial and Medical Nuclear Safety, and other increasingly responsible positions within NRC. Dr. Cool is a member of the Main Commission of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and Chairman of ICRP Committee 4 on Application of the Commission’s Recommendations, and is a Fellow of the Health Physics Society.

donald a. cool

Corradini M

MICHAEL L. CORRADINI

Corradini M

is Wisconsin Distinguished Professor of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He served from 1995 to 2001 as Associate Dean for the College of Engineering and as Chair of Engineering Physics from 2001 to 2011. He has published widely in areas related to vapor explosion phenomena, jet spray dynamics, and transport phenomena in multiphase systems. In 1998, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. He also served as a presidential appointee in 2002 and 2003 as the chairman of the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (a separate government agency).

From 2004 to 2008, he served as a board member of the National Accreditation Board for Nuclear Training of the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations. In 2006, he was appointed to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards and was elected to NCRP. Most recently, he was appointed Chair of the Scientific Advisory Committee to the French Atomic Energy Agency. He began and now serves as the Director of the Wisconsin Energy Institute. He was elected as the President of the American Nuclear Society for 2012 to 2013.

michael l. corradini

Cucinotta F

FRANCIS A. CUCINOTTA

Cucinotta F

is a Professor of Health Physics at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Dr. Cucinotta received his PhD in nuclear physics from Old Dominion University. He worked at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center from 1997 to 2013 as the Radiological Health Officer, Space Radiation Project Manager and Chief Scientist. Dr. Cucinotta developed the astronaut exposure data base of organ doses and cancer risk estimates for all human missions from Mercury to the International Space Station (ISS), and developed risk models for acute, cancer and circulatory diseases. He was NASA's manager for the construction of the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), and NSRL Operations from 2003 to 2012. Dr. Cucinotta worked on radiation safety in NASA's mission control for the Space Shuttle and ISS programs in 1989 and 1990, including during the October of 1989 solar event, and from 2000 to 2006.

Dr. Cucinotta has published over 300 journal articles, numerous book chapters, and over 100 NASA technical reports on nuclear and space physics, radiation shielding, DNA damage and repair, biodosimetry, systems biology, and risk assessment models. He has won numerous NASA awards for his efforts in research, mission safety, and research management. Dr. Cucinotta is currently the President of the Radiation Research Society, and a Council Member of NCRP.

francis a. cucinotta

LAWRENCE T. DAUER

is Associate Attending Physicist, and Associate Clinical Member in the Departments of Medical Physics and Radiology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York City. He earned an MS in Health Physics and a PhD in Adult Education. He is certified in comprehensive health physics by the American Board of Health Physics and is past chair of the Radiation Safety Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), past President of the Greater New York Chapter of the Health Physics Society (HPS), Executive Council Member of the Medical Physics Section of the HPS, a Member of the Joint Safety Committee of the Society for Interventional Radiology and the American College of Radiology, past council member of the Radiological and Medical Physics chapter of the AAPM, and a member of editorial and review boards of several scientific journals. He serves as the Chair of the MSKCC Emergency Management Committee, a member of the Radiation Injury Treatment Network. In 2005, he received the Elda E. Anderson Award from HPS. He is a Council member and serves on he Board of Directors of the NCRP. He also serves as a member of the International Commission on Radiological Protection Committee 3 on protection in medicine, a member of the science council for the International Organization for Medical Physics, and was on the program committee for the International Atomic Energy Agency's International Conference on Radiation Protection in Medicine-Setting the Scene for the Next Decade. He serves on the Radiation Advisory Committee of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board. He has several publications in the topical areas of radiation protection and risks in the fields of detection, radiology, interventional radiology, x-ray imaging, nuclear medicine, and radiation oncology, as well as surgery and medicine.

lawrence t. dauer

DavisS

Scott Davis

DavisSis Professor in the Department of Epidemiology in the School of Public Health, at the University of Washington and a Full Member in the Program in Epidemiology of the Division of Public Health Sciences at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. He obtained his undergraduate degree in Biology and Chemistry from the University of New Mexico, a Master of Science in Community Health from the University of Rochester, and a PhD in Epidemiology from the University of Washington. He served as a Research Associate in Epidemiology at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima, Japan, from 1983 to 1985. Dr. Davis was a Special Fellow of the Leukemia Society of American from 1986 to 1987, and the recipient of a Research Career Development Award from the National Cancer Institute from 1988 to 1993. He is an elected member of the American Epidemiological Society, and a Fellow of the American College of Epidemiology. He served as a member of the BEIR VII Committee of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Davis is the only foreign epidemiologist elected a member (Academician) of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences.

Scott Davis

DeCairS

Sara DeCair

DeCairS

has been a health physicist with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air since 2003. She works on policy, planning, training and outreach for EPA’s radiological emergency preparedness and response program. She is the project and technical lead for revising the Protective Action Guides Manual. She previously worked for 7 y with the State of Michigan’s Department of Environmental Quality. She spent three of those years in nuclear power plant emergency planning and before that was an inspector of radioactive materials registrants and a radiation incident responder.

Sara DeCair

Donahue C

CHRISTINE A. DONAHUE

Donahue C

Christine A. Donahue was elected to NCRP in 2009 and has served on the Scientific Committees 1-18 and 1-19. She is certified in comprehensive practice by the American Board of Health Physics (ABHP), and has served on the ABHP exam development panel and as Chairperson of the Professional Development Committee. Ms. Donahue received a BS in Biophysics from University of California, Berkeley in 1981, Nuclear Engineering MS program at University of Virginia, Charlottesville in 1982, and MS in Radiological Engineering from California State University, San Jose in 1987.

Ms. Donahue is currently Director of Radiological Safety Programs at CB&I managing radiological controls and program development in support of environmental remediation efforts including Navy Base Realignment and Closure activities. Ms. Donahue was the Operational Health Physics Manager and Radiological Control Manager at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California from 1994 to 2008 responsible for site-wide radiological protection activities. She has served as a DOE lead auditor for nuclear facility readiness reviews and provided technical support to radiological safety programs at Argonne National Laboratory and Nevada National Security Site. Prior to work with DOE national laboratories, she was a senior Health Physicist at Stanford University and served as the Radiation Safety Officer at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Hospital from 1987 to 1991. Ms. Donahue began her career in 1982 as a nuclear engineer with Bechtel National, Inc. in San Francisco and Pacific Gas & Electric where she provided health physics support during the first outage at the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power.

christine a. donahue

Dynlacht J

JOSEPH R. DYNLACHT

Dynlacht J

is an Associate Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the Indiana University School of Medicine and a member of the Experimental Therapeutics Division of the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center. He received a BS degree in Biology from Florida State University and a PhD in Cellular and Molecular Radiobiology from Colorado State University before completing a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Dynlacht teaches a course entitled "Radiation and Cancer Biology" to radiation oncology residents and radiation therapy students annually, and is Co-director of the School of Medicine's Clinical Problem Solving course for first year medical students. He received a Trustee Award for his teaching efforts and involvement in resident training in 2012.

Dr. Dynlacht's research interests include the development of agents that reduce normal tissue damage after irradiation (specifically damage to the lens), development of radiation countermeasures, mechanisms of heat- and radiation-induced cell killing, and development of thermally-activated chemotherapeutic compounds. He has served on advisory panels for several organizations, including Brookhaven National Laboratory, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and is currently an Associate Editor for the journal Radiation Research.

joseph r. dynlacht

Einstein A

ANDREW J. EINSTEIN

Einstein A

is an academic cardiologist with a clinical focus on cardiac imaging and a research focus on radiation safety and medical imaging. He presently serves as both Herbert Irving Assistant Professor of Medicine (in Radiology) and Victoria and Esther Aboodi Assistant Professor of Medicine (in Radiology) at Columbia University, as well as Director of Cardiac Computed Tomography (CT) Research and Co-Director of Cardiac CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. He and his colleagues are involved in numerous research efforts aimed at better quantifying the radiation burden from medical imaging and interventional procedures, as well as developing and validating approaches to reduce radiation risk to patients and populations. This interdisciplinary program has been recently funded by grants from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the Margaret Q. Landenberger Foundation, the Louis V. Gerstner, Jr. Scholars Program, and investigator-initiated grants from industry.

Dr. Einstein's research in this area has resulted in numerous publications in journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, and The Lancet. This work has been influential in affecting clinical practice, has been widely reported in the popular media and cited over two thousand times in the scientific literature. For this work, he has received the Louis Katz Cardiovascular Research Prize for a Young Investigator, the American Federation for Medical Research's Junior Physician Investigator Award, and the American College of Cardiology's Douglas P. Zipes Distinguished Young Investigator Award. In addition to his work on NCRP, Dr. Einstein is a member of the Food and Drug Administration's Medical Imaging Drugs Advisory Committee and a consultant to the International Atomic Energy Agency.

He is a board member of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the Association for Clinical and Translational Science, and the Cardiovascular Council of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, and serves on the editorial boards of several cardiology journals. He has served as a Special Scientific Advisor to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima Japan, a corresponding member of the International Commission on Radiological Protection Task Group 62 on Radiological Protection in Cardiology, and a reviewer for the National Cancer Institute and over 20 journals. Dr. Einstein received an AB from Princeton University in mathematics, an MS from Columbia University in biostatistics/patient oriented research, and MD and PhD degrees from Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

andrew j. einstein

FlanneryC

Cindy Flannery

FlanneryCis a Senior Health Physicist in the Office of Federal and State Materials and Environmental Management Programs at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). In this position, she serves as office lead for safety culture activities and is also a member of the working group tasked with developing the regulatory basis for the revisions to the radiation protection regulations (10 CFR Part 20). She joined NRC in 2004 and served as the Team Leader of the Medical Radiation Safety Team for 5 y. Ms. Flannery has 20 y experience as a health physicist in the medical industry as well as in military and research organizations. Prior to NRC, she served as Branch Chief and Radiation Safety Officer for the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and as the Radiation Safety Officer/Health Physicist at the Food and Drug Administration. Before her employment by the federal government, she worked as a Health Physics Consultant and as a Nuclear Medicine Technologist. Ms. Flannery graduated from Georgetown University with an MS in Health Physics and from the University of Wisconsin with a BS in Nuclear Medicine Technology. She was certified by the American Board of Health Physics in 2001. She currently serves as Chair of the American Board of Health Physics Part I Examination Panel.

Cindy Flannery

Fleming P

PATRICIA A. FLEMING

Fleming P

is Provost, Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs, and Professor in Philosophy at Saint Mary's. She received her master's and doctorate from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. While there, she served as the assistant editor of the Philosophy of Science Journal. She has also served as a consultant to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency in Paris, France. Dr. Fleming has published and lectured internationally on the ethical and epistemological issues associated with the disposal of high-level nuclear waste, including the use of expert elicitation methodology in site characterization, waste management and indigenous populations, informed consent in stakeholder populations, and circularity in regulatory policy.

Dr. Fleming's familiarity with ethical concerns regarding the health effects from radiation exposure led to her appointment on the National Academy of Science Committee to Assess the Scientific Information for the Radiation Exposure Screening and Education Program. She served on the Veterans Board on Dose Reconstruction from 2005 to 2013.

patricia a. fleming

Frush-D

Donald P. Frush

Frush-D

is the John Strohbehn Professor of Radiology, Professor of Pediatrics, vice chair for safety and quality, faculty member of the Medical Physics Graduate Program, and Medical Director of the Duke Medical Radiation Center. Dr. Frush received a BS from The University of California Davis, MD from Duke University, was a pediatric Resident at University of California San Francisco from 1985 to 1987, a radiology resident at Duke, and finished a pediatric radiology fellowship at Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati in 1992.

Dr. Frush’s research interests are predominantly focused on pediatric body computed tomography (CT), including technology assessment, techniques for pediatric multidetector computed tomography examinations, assessment of image quality, and CT radiation dosimetry and dose reduction. International affiliations include the World Health Organization and the International Atomic Energy Agency. Dr. Frush is currently a board member of the Society for Pediatric Radiology as well as NCRP, Chair of the Image Gently Alliance, Trustee of the American Board of Radiology, and a Fellow of Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance.

Donald P. Frush

Goans R

RONALD E. GOANS

Goans R

has worked in the field of nuclear physics and radiation effects since 1966. He received his PhD in radiation physics from the University of Tennessee in 1974, his MD from the George Washington University School of Medicine in 1983, and the MPH from the Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in 2000. He is currently Senior Medical Advisor with MJW Corporation and Senior Medical/Scientific Advisor with the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS).

Following medical school and residency, Dr. Goans had a research fellowship in the Laboratory of Theoretical and Physical Biology at the National Institutes of Health (National Institute of Child Health and Human Development). In this capacity he performed mathematical modeling of calcium dynamics in different pathological states. Dr. Goans is Board Certified in Occupational Medicine through the American Board of Preventive Medicine. He practices general occupational and environmental medicine, particularly oriented toward the medical management of radiation injury. Through REAC/TS, he provides medical consultation on the diagnosis and treatment of actual and suspected radiation exposures, as well as long-term medical follow-up for selected radiation exposure victims. Dr. Goans' recent research has involved development of mathematical techniques for the early estimation of radiation dose, infrared analysis of local radiation injury, and the use of high frequency ultrasound for the analysis of radiation burns.

ronald e. goans

Goldin E

ERIC M. GOLDIN

Goldin E

is radiation safety specialist with 35 y of experience in power reactor health physics. He earned a BS in Nuclear Engineering from The University of Arizona and an MS in Nuclear Engineering/Health Physics from Texas A&M University. He completed a PhD in Biomedical Sciences at the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston. Dr. Goldin has been a member of NCRP Program Area Committee 2 since 2004, participating in report writing for Scientific Committees 46-17, 2-4, 2-5, and 2-7. He is an active member of the Health Physics Society (HPS), served on the Board of Directors, several committees and sections, and on the American Board of Health Physics (ABHP).

Dr. Goldin has been certified by the ABHP since 1984 and was awarded HPS Fellow status in 2012. Dr. Goldin's radiological engineering experience includes ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) programs, instrumentation, radioactive waste management, emergency planning, dosimetry, decommissioning, licensing, effluents, and environmental monitoring. In addition, he taught graduate/upper division level courses in radiation biology, radiological assessment, and power reactor health physics at San Diego State University for over 20 y and assisted in the development and implementation of a Radiation Protection Technician training program at MiraCosta College. Dr. Goldin retired from Southern California Edison in 2012 and currently provides technical support and decommissioning planning to the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station.

eric m. goldin

GroganH

HELEN A. GROGAN

GroganH

is President of Cascade Scientific, Inc., an environmental consulting firm. Dr. Grogan received her PhD from Imperial College of Science and Technology at the University of London in 1984 and has more than 25 y of experience in radioecology, environmental dose reconstruction, and the assessment of radioactive and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. She first worked at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland on the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal for the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra). Dr. Grogan was actively involved in the early international cooperative efforts to test models designed to quantify the transfer and accumulation of radionuclides and other trace substances in the environment.

Validation of computer models developed to predict the fate and transport of radionuclides in the environment remains a key interest of hers. In 1989 Dr. Grogan returned to the United Kingdom as a senior consultant to Intera Information Technologies before moving to the United States a few years later, where she has worked closely with Risk Assessment Corporation managing the technical aspects of a wide variety of projects that tend to focus on public health risk from environmental exposure to chemicals and radionuclides. Dr. Grogan has served on committees for the National Academy of Sciences, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the U.S. Environment Protection Agency, and NCRP. She co-edited the text book Radiological Risk Assessment and Environmental Analysis published by Oxford University Press in July 2008, and authored the chapter on Model Validation.

helen a. grogan

Willie Harris

is the Director, Radiation Protection for Exelon Nuclear. In his current role he is responsible to develop the governance and provide oversight of the radiation protection programs for the largest operator of nuclear power plants in the United States. He has over 35 y of broad-based experience in commercial nuclear power plants, which includes over 25 y in supervisory and management positions. He holds a bachelor’s degree in radiation protection and a master degree in business administration. He is a Certified Health Physicist and a registered radiation protection Technologist and holds a senior reactor operator certification. He continues to serve several industry committees which includes the Scientific Advisory Committee for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Low Dose Research, the EPRI Technical Advisory Committee, and the World Nuclear Association Radiation Protection Working Group.

Willie Harris

Held K

KATHRYN D. HELD

Held K

Dr. Held was first elected to the Council in 2006 and served on the NCRP Board of Directors from 2008 to 2014. She was Vice President from 2011 to 2016 and is currently Co-Chair of Program Area Committee 1 on Basic Criteria, Epidemiology, Radiobiology, and Risk. She also served as Chair of the Program Committee for the 2011 Annual Meeting on “Scientific and Policy Challenges of Particle Radiations in Medical Therapy and Space Missions.” Dr. Held was a member of Scientific Committee (SC) 1-22 on Radiation Protection for Astronauts in Short-Term Missions and Phase I of SC 1-24 on Radiation Exposures in Space and the Potential of Central Nervous System Effects and an advisor to several NCRP committees.

Dr. Held is an Associate Radiation Biologist in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Biology) at Harvard Medical School (HMS). At MGH, Dr. Held leads a team that is involved in research on molecular mechanisms for the induction of bystander effects by high energy particles in cells and tissues, characterization of charged particle beam induced DNA damage responses and cell killing, development of a cancer screening platform for personalized radiation medicine, and mechanisms for regulation of DNA damage response by cell-cell communication. Dr. Held also teaches radiation biology to radiation oncology medical and physics residents and graduate students at MGH/HMS and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Dr. Held earned her PhD in biology from the University of Texas, Austin. She has served on review panels for numerous federal agencies including the National Institutes of Health, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command programs and other organizations such as the Radiological Society of North America. She is on the Editorial Boards of Radiation Research and the International Journal of Radiation Biology, and has served on committees for the National Academy of Science/National Research Council, NASA, and the American Society of Radiation Oncology. She is a past President of the Radiation Research Society.

kathryn d. held

Kathryn A. Higley

Kathryn A. Higley

Higley-K

Kathryn A. Higley is a Professor and Head of the School of Nuclear Science and Engineering in the College of Engineering at Oregon State University. Dr. Higley received both her PhD and MS in Radiological Health Sciences from Colorado State University, and her BA in Chemistry from Reed College. She has held both Reactor Operator and Senior Reactor Operator's licenses, and is a former Reactor Supervisor for the Reed College TRIGA reactor. Dr. Higley started her career as a Radioecologist for Portland General Electric. She later worked for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as a Senior Research Scientist in the area of environmental health physics. Dr. Higley has been at Oregon State University since 1994 teaching undergraduate and graduate classes on radioecology, dosimetry, radiation protection, radiochemistry, and radiation biology.

Her fields of interest include environmental transport and fate of radionuclides, radioecology, radiochemistry, radiation dose assessment, neutron activation analysis, nuclear emergency response, and environmental regulations. She is vice-chair of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's Committee 5 (protection of the environment); a fellow of the Health Physics Society and a Certified Health Physicist.

Kathryn A. Higley

Howell R

ROGER W. HOWELL

Howell R

is a Professor of Radiology at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School where he serves as Chief of the Division of Radiation Research. Dr. Howell's laboratory conducts research on dosimetry and radiobiology of internal radionuclides, with emphasis on the microscopic dose distributions encountered in nuclear medicine. He also studies the capacity of vitamins and other natural agents to protect reproductive organs, bone marrow, and the gastrointestinal tract against damage caused by ionizing radiation.

These efforts have led to over 100 publications in peer-reviewed journals. Dr. Howell teaches physics to radiology residents and provides educational lectures for emergency responders in New Jersey. He has served on review panels for federal agencies including the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Energy, and other organizations. Dr. Howell is a member of the Medical Internal Radiation Dose Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, He has served on several report committees of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) and was elected to the ICRU Main Commission in May 2014. Dr. Howell earned his BS and PhD in Physics from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

roger w. howell

Huff JJanice Huff

HyerR

Randall N. Hyer

HyerR

Randall N. Hyer, Senior Fellow and Assistant Director for Environmental, Health and Safety, Center for Risk Communication.

Dr. Hyer graduated with distinction from the U.S. Naval Academy, and served 12 y on active duty in the U.S. Navy. After earning his medical degree from Duke University, Dr. Hyer served as the 40th Winter-Over Medical Officer and Assistant Officer-in-Charge with Operation DEEP FREEZE at McMurdo and South Pole Stations in Antarctica. Dr. Hyer earned his PhD from Oxford, studying the molecular genetics of juvenile diabetes and helped determine the role of the insulin gene in disease susceptibility.

In 1994, the National Institutes of Health awarded Dr. Hyer the "NIH Outstanding Research Award for Clinical Trainees." Trained in public health at Walter Reed Hospital and Harvard University, Commander Hyer supported four major military operations in the European, African, and southwest Asian theatres to include service as Chief Public Health Advisor for the Kosovo operations and Deputy Surgeon for the Mozambique flood relief operations. Dr. Hyer then spent 4 y at the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva as the first WHO Civil Military Liaison Officer and served as part of the WHO's outbreak response team to deadly outbreaks like anthrax, SARS, and avian influenza as well as having organized missions during the 2005 Tsunami response. His experiences with the media in outbreaks and emergencies led him to coauthor the popular WHO handbook, Effective Media Communication During Public Health Emergencies.

Appointed a U.S. Congressional Fellow for Senator Pete V. Domenici (R-New Mexico), he helped introduce legislation to safeguard genetic privacy that eventually became the Genetic Information Non-discrimination Act (GINA) of 2008. In 2005, Dr. Hyer joined Merck Vaccine Division in Global Medical Affairs and Policy. His focus has been the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. In 2009, he was transferred to MSD in Tokyo, Japan.

Randall N. Hyer

Irwin B

WILLIAM E. IRWIN

Irwin B

leads the Radiological and Toxicological Sciences Program at the Vermont Department of Health. He is responsible for all aspects of the Vermont Radiation Control Program in the Healing Arts, Industrial Applications, Environmental Surveillance and Emergency Preparedness. He is Chair-Elect for the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, for which he has served on committees focused on radiological and nuclear emergency preparedness and on environmental nuclear issues. He is a Certified Health Physicist and long-time member of the Health Physics Society and the American Academy of Health Physics where he was a member of the American Board of Health Physics panel of examiners. Prior to serving in government, Dr. Irwin was Laser Safety Officer and a Radiation Safety Officer at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

During that time, he was a consultant to industry and government on measurements and the health effects of radiofrequency radiation, laser radiation, extremely low frequency and nuclear magnetic resonance electromagnetic fields, as well as ionizing radiations produced by machines and radioactive materials. His dissertation was on the health effects of radiofrequency radiation exposure from wireless telecommunications. Both his PhD and MS were earned at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. Before graduate school, Dr. Irwin worked in the commercial nuclear power industry as an instructor in radiation protection, chemistry and nuclear plant systems and operations. He started his career as a radiation protection technician controlling exposures to radiation and radioactive materials on-board U.S. Navy submarines, guided missile cruisers, and aircraft carriers at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company.

william e. irwin

Jones C

CYNTHIA G. JONES

Jones C

is currently the Senior Technical Advisor for Nuclear Safety and Analysis, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Washington, DC, where she serves as a Commission-wide resource for providing technical support for major policy, program or operational issues associated with nuclear safety, radiation protection, accident and radiological consequence analyses, safety-security interface, international relations, and advanced reactors nuclear safety analyses. From 2012 to 2016, Dr. Jones worked at the U.S. Mission to International Organizations in Vienna, Austria as the expert and Nuclear Safety Attaché on nuclear safety issues and programs providing programmatic and policy oversight for United Nation and the International Atomic Energy Agency’s (IAEA) safety programs on behalf of the United States. In 2013, she was asked by IAEA to serve as an invited expert in the development of IAEA’s comprehensive report on Tokyo Electric Power Company’s Fukushima Daiichi Accident. With experience as a physicist, health physicist, and nuclear engineer, Dr. Jones has extensive international experience in both radiation safety and nuclear security, and has more than 95 publications, reports or speeches in the fields of nuclear science and radiological protection. In 2011, she was elected as one of 100 scientific experts worldwide to serve as an NCRP Council member.

Before joining NRC, Dr. Jones worked as a physicist at the National Bureau of Standards, and held positions as both a reactor and medical physicist at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. Dr. Jones has a PhD and an MS in Nuclear Engineering from the University of Maryland, an MS degree in Health Physics from the Georgia Institute of Technology, and a Bachelor’s degree in Physics from Augsburg College, Minneapolis, Minnesota. She includes German as her foreign language.

cynthia g. jones

Jorgensen T

TIMOTHY J. JORGENSEN

Jorgensen T

is an Associate Professor of Radiation Medicine at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. He is a radiation biologist, cancer epidemiologist, and public health professional. He has training in radiation health sciences and radiation biology (PhD, Johns Hopkins); cancer molecular biology (postdoctoral fellowship; Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School); risk assessment (graduate certificate; Center for Risk Science and Public Policy, Johns Hopkins); and epidemiology (MPH, Johns Hopkins). He is Certified in Public Health by the National Board of Public Health Examiners. Dr. Jorgensen is Chairman of the Radiation Safety Committee at Georgetown University.

He teaches graduate courses in radiation biology, radiation protection, and cancer risk assessment, and is Director of the Health Physics and Radiation Protection Graduate Program at the Georgetown University School of Medicine. He also trains radiation oncology residents at Georgetown University Hospital. In addition to his regular appointment at Georgetown, he also holds an adjunct faculty appointment in the Department of Epidemiology at the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Jorgensen's research interests include the genetic factors that determine cellular radiation resistance, and genes that may modify the risk of radiation-induced cancer. He served on NCRP Scientific Committee 6-5, which issued Commentary No. 20 — a report that dealt with the radiation protection issues associated with cargo scanning with high energy x rays.

timothy j. jorgensen

Kennedy-W

WILLIAM E. KENNEDY, JR.

Kennedy-W

has extensive experience as a project manager, task leader, and individual contributor covering a broad range of health physics and nuclear engineering topics. He received his BS and MS degrees in Nuclear Engineering from Kansas State University. Mr. Kennedy has been involved in the development of environmental pathway and radiation dosimetry models used to assess potential health and environmental impacts that resulted from releases of radionuclides to the environment.

He specializes in the use of these models in environmental dose reconstruction, radioactive materials transport, radioactive waste disposal, and evaluation of nuclear facility operating practices. Over the past 37 y, Mr. Kennedy has led and contributed to a variety of projects for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the U.S. Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, and private industry. He has been involved with development of the technical basis for revised standards and regulations, and serves as the chair of ANSI/HPS N13.12, Surface and volume Radioactivity Standards for Clearance. He served as a consultant to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna, Austria, and was a member of the IAEA Advisory Groups to evaluate the Derivation of Exempt Quantities for Application to Terrestrial Waste Disposal and Derivation of Exempt Quantities for Recycle of Materials from Nuclear Facilities.

He was an invited lecturer for IAEA training courses on Management of Radioactive Waste from Nuclear Power Plants at Argonne National Laboratory; on Safety Assessment Modeling for Low and Intermediate Radwastes in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and in Cairo, Egypt; and on Environmental Monitoring in Kiev, Ukraine. In 1990, he received the Health Physics Society's (HPS) prestigious Elda E. Anderson Award. He served as a member of the HPS Board of Directors from 1998 through 2001 and was selected as a fellow of the society in 2002. He was a member of the U.S. delegation to the 10th Congress of the International Radiation Protection Association in Hiroshima, Japan.

william e. kennedy, jr.

Kiel

KATHERINE A. KIEL

Kiel

is a Professor of Economics at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts. Her research is on real estate price indices, racial discrimination in housing markets, and the demand for environmental quality in the United States. Her work has been published in journals such as Land Economics and the Journal of Urban Economics. She is currently a board member for the New England Economic Partnership and is on the Board of Economic Advisors for Associated Industries of Massachusetts. In the past she served on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Advisory Council on Clean Air Compliance. She received her PhD in Economics from the University of California at San Diego and her AB from Occidental College.

katherine a. kiel

KlemicG

Gladys A. Klemic

KlemicGis a physicist with the National Urban Security Technology Laboratory (NUSTL), a federal resource of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security which supports the development of technologies for emergency response agencies. She designs and conducts laboratory tests of radiation detectors, and operational field evaluations of prototype and commercially available equipment for firefighter and law enforcement agencies. She is active in national standards development and has been with NUSTL and its predecessor, the Environmental Measurements Laboratory since 1990. Her earlier work specialized in environmental thermoluminescence dosimetry, including conducting dosimeter research, measurements and analysis, and leading international intercomparisons. She has authored or co-authored 40 scientific and technical publications and is a member of the Health Physics Society and the National Fire Protection Association. She has a BS degree in Physics from Wayne State University and an MS degree in Physics from New York University.

Gladys A. Klemic

Kroger-L

Linda A. Kroger

Kroger-L

is Assistant Clinical Professor of Radiology at the University of California (UC) Davis School of Medicine and has served as the Radiation Safety Officer for the UC Davis Health System for the past 10 y. Ms. Kroger received her undergraduate degree and her Masters Degree from Rutgers University. She has been with UC Davis for 25 y. Prior to her arrival at UC Davis, Ms. Kroger worked for private industry in biopharmacology research and drug development. She transitioned to cancer research when she joined UC Davis in 1988. From 1988 through 2000, her research focused on the development of new radiopharmaceuticals for both diagnostic imaging and treatment of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and breast cancer. Since assuming her role as Radiation Safety Officer in 2003, she has focused on regulatory compliance, quality assurance issues as well as education of medical students, residents and fellows with the overall goal of improving workplace radiation safety. Ms. Kroger oversees the nonclinical aspects of nuclear medicine training for the radiology residency program at UC Davis. In addition, she has taken an interest in radiologic emergency preparedness. Ms. Kroger has authored or co-author more than 50 peer-reviewed journal articles and has presented at numerous scientific conferences. She has served in a number of roles in both the local chapter as well as the national Health Physics Society and been an active participant on NCRP committees since 2005.

linda a. kroger

No Image

AMY KRONENBERG

is a staff biophysicist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Her research focuses on fundamental processes that may result in genomic change following exposure to sparsely or densely ionizing radiation. Her group has also addressed links between molecular mechanisms of DNA damage repair and programmed cell death. Dr. Kronenberg teaches radiation biophysics to students at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Summer School. Dr. Kronenberg received her ScD in Cancer Biology from the Harvard School of Public Health. She has served on review panels for federal agencies and international scientific review panels. She is a senior editor for Radiation Research and is also a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Radiation Research (Japan). Dr. Kronenberg's activities with NCRP have included prior service on the Board of Directors, as a member or chair of the Nominating Committee, and as a member of several scientific committees. She was recently an invited speaker at the 2011 Annual Meeting and is currently a member of NCRP Program Area Committee 1.

amy kronenberg

JOHN J. LANZA

is the Director of the Florida Department of Health in Escambia County (FDOH-EC). Dr. Lanza is a Board-certified pediatrician with a PhD in Medical Radiation Physics from the University of Florida. Since 2001, he has been the Public Health and Medical co-chair for the Florida Department of Law Enforcement's Domestic Security Task Force Northwest Florida. Before his FDOH-EC position, Dr. Lanza worked as a pediatric emergency department physician in Lakeland, Florida and was in private pediatric practice in Longwood, Florida. Dr. Lanza is a fellow of the America Academy of Pediatrics, a past president of the Escambia County Medical Society (2004), a member of the American Medical Association, and the Florida Medical Association (FMA), where he was the chair of the FMA Council on Public Health for 8 y. He is a founding board member of the Florida Public Health Institute. In addition, he is a member of the Florida Chapter of the Health Physics Society and the national Health Physics Society where he serves as past president of their Homeland Security Section and a member of the medical response subcommittee. Dr. Lanza was recently elected to the Health Physics Society Board of Directors. In 2005, he was appointed as a Florida Commissioner on the Southeast Compact Commission for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management. Currently, he is on the faculty of the Master of Public Health program at the University of West Florida's (UWF) School of Allied Health and Life Sciences as well as holding faculty positions at UWF's Department of Health, Leisure, and Exercise Science, and the Center for Environmental Diagnostics and Bioremediation (CEDB). With the CEDB, he was the co-principal investigator on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency funded projects dealing with local environmental health issues.

In addition, he led an 8 y research project on human health effects of toxins such as dioxin from local Superfund sites. Dr. Lanza is also a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences at the Florida State University College of Medicine. Dr. Lanza serves on the Residency Advisory Committee for the joint U.S. Army and Navy Aerospace Medicine Residency Program at Naval Air Station Pensacola. Dr. Lanza has numerous publications in the fields of health physics, environmental health, and public health preparedness. Most recently, he was a member of the NCRP scientific committee that produced Report No.165,"Responding to a Radiological or Nuclear Terrorism Incident: A Guide for Decision Makers."

john j. lanza

Leidholdt

EDWIN M. LEIDHOLDT, JR.

Leidholdt

is a program manager in the National Health Physics Program, Veterans Health Administration, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). His areas of interest include technical quality assurance and dose reduction in medical imaging and medical response to radiological incidents. He is certified by the American Board of Radiology in Medical Nuclear Physics and Diagnostic Radiological Physics. He received a PhD in Nuclear Engineering, a Master of Applied Mathematics, a Master of Engineering in Nuclear Engineering, and a BS in Nuclear Engineering, all from the University of Virginia. He has served as a Radiation Safety Officer at two VA medical centers, as technical director of nuclear medicine at one, and as the Radiation Safety Program Manager for the former Veterans Health Administration Western Region.

He is a Clinical Associate Professor of Radiology at the University of California, Davis, and a Clinical Adjunct Professor of Radiology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. He is a co-author of six scientific papers and abstracts, one textbook chapter, and one textbook, in its third edition. He served on the scientific committee that wrote NCRP Report No. 165. Dr. Leidholdt served as a surface line officer in the U.S. Navy from 1971 until 1975.

edwin m. leidholdt, jr.

Lipoti Jill

JILL A. LIPOTI

Lipoti Jill

was the Director of Water Monitoring and Standards at the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection until her retirement in 2013. From 1989 to 2010, she directed the activities of the Radiation Protection Programs for New Jersey, with responsibility for the x ray, radioactive materials, nuclear emergency response, environmental monitoring, radon, and nonionizing programs, involving regulation and licensure of professionals. She received the Edward J. Ill Excellence in Medicine Award in 2009 for her work in reducing patient radiation dose from x rays. Dr. Lipoti served as the New Jersey Commissioner to the Atlantic Interstate Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact. Dr. Lipoti was elected to the Board of Directors and as Chairperson for the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD), a nonprofit organization representing all 50 states. In 2000, she received the Gerald S. Parker Award of Merit, the CRCPD's highest award. Dr. Lipoti was elected to NCRP in 2001 and has served on the Board of Directors, Program Area Committee 5 on Environmental Radiation and Radioactive Waste Issues, and on Scientific Committee 5-1, Approach to Optimizing Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery From Nuclear or Radiological Terrorism Incidents.

She served as a member and chair of the Radiation Advisory Committee of the Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board (SAB) and also served on the SAB's Committee on Science Integration for Decision Making. She served on the Food and Drug Administration's Technical Electronic Product Radiation Safety Standards Committee. Dr. Lipoti served on the National Academies committee to write a report on Uranium Mining in Virginia under the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. Dr. Lipoti received the Distinguished Alumni George H. Cook Award, Cook College, Rutgers University. She received her PhD in Environmental Science from Rutgers University in 1985. She has traveled to Uganda and Ethiopia on missions for the International Atomic Energy Agency.

jill a. lipoti

Little

Mark P. Little

Littleis a Senior Investigator with the National Cancer Institute, Radiation Epidemiology Branch (REB). He studied mathematics at Trinity College, Cambridge and obtained his doctorate in mathematics at New College, Oxford. Over the last two decades he has been analyzing cancer and cardiovascular disease risks in the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors, and in other irradiated populations and offspring. Dr. Little has explored mechanistic models of carcinogenesis and cardiovascular disease in populations exposed to ionizing radiation and cigarette smoke. His statistical interests also include the effects of measurement error on regression estimates. Previously, he worked in the Imperial College Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and before that at U.K. National Radiological Protection Board (now part of the Public Health England). He has served as consultant to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation for the recently completed cancer epidemiology document, to the International Atomic Energy Agency, to the U.K. Committee on the Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment, and to NCRP Scientific Committee 1-21. In REB, Dr. Little is working on assessment of thyroid cancer risk in various cohorts of persons exposed as result of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident, on risks of various health endpoints in the U.S. cohort of radiologic technologists, on treatment-related second cancer risks in various populations, focusing on dose measurement error and gene-radiation interaction. He has a particular interest in risks at low doses and dose rates, specifically in relation to childhood leukemia and circulatory disease.

Mark P. Little

Locke

PAUL A. LOCKE

Locke

a public health scientist and attorney, is an Associate Professor at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Division of Molecular and Translational Toxicology. He holds an MPH from Yale University School of Medicine, a DrPH from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, and a JD degree from Vanderbilt University School of Law.

Dr. Locke's research and practice focus on how decision makers use environmental health science (toxicology, radiobiology, epidemiology) in regulation and policy making and how environmental health sciences influence the policy-making process. His areas of study include radiation risk communication, designing and evaluating radiation protection initiatives and radiation policies, radon risk reduction, safe disposal of high level radioactive waste, and use of computed tomography as a diagnostic screening tool. Dr. Locke directs the School's Doctor of Public Health program in Environmental Health Sciences.

Dr. Locke was a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board from 2003 to 2009. He has served on seven National Academy committees, and is currently a member of an NAS committee that is tasked with providing an assessment of lessons learned from the Fukushima nuclear accident for improving the safety and security of nuclear plants in the United States. He is also a member of the Board of Directors of NCRP. He was program committee chair of the NCRP's 2010 annual meeting entitled "Communication of Radiation Benefits and Risks in Decision Making." Dr. Locke is admitted to practice law in the state of New York, the District of Columbia, the Southern District Court of New York, and the United States Supreme Court.

paul a. locke

Lurie-Alan

Alan G. Lurie

Lurie-Alan

Alan G. Lurie is professor and chair of the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Diagnostic Sciences and chair of the Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Oral Health and Diagnostic Sciences, at the University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine. He has John Dempsey Hospital appointments in the Departments of Dentistry and Diagnostic Imaging and Therapeutics. He has been a full-time member of the dental school faculty since 1973, during which time he has done R0-1 research on radiation carcinogenesis, administered predoctoral and graduate educational programs, performed clinical research, and performed imaging care on patients in both dental and medical radiology settings.

He is past president and a current member of the School of Dental Medicine Council, co-founder of the University of Connecticut Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Clinic, and a member of numerous dental school and institutional committees. He is also an active member of his specialty nationally, having served as Councilor for Public Policy and Scientific Affairs of the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, and Past President of the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology. Dr. Lurie has more than 100 publications in the refereed literature, and numerous presentations to local, state, national and international organizations.

Alan G. Lurie

Mahesh

MAHADEVAPPA MAHESH

Mahesh

is the Professor of Radiology and Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. He is also the Chief Physicist at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He is also the Professor of Environmental Health and Engineering at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Dr. Mahesh obtained his PhD in Medical Physics from Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. Dr. Mahesh is board certified from the American Board of Radiology in diagnostic radiological physics and is a member of the Radiation Control Advisory Board for the State of Maryland. His research interests are in medical imaging, particularly in areas of multiple-row detector computed tomography (MDCT), interventional fluoroscopy, and digital mammography. As chief physicist, he oversees the quality assurance program for the diagnostic radiology that includes maintaining compliance with regard to state and federal regulations and ensuring safe use of radiation to patients. He often provides counsels to patients concerned over their radiation exposure from diagnostic x-ray examinations.

Dr. Mahesh is the editor of the Physics Columns (Technology Talk and Medical Physics Consult) for the Journal of American College of Radiology (JACR) since 2007. He is also the Associate Editor of JACR, Deputy Editor for Academic Radiology, Editorial Board Member for RadioGraphics and Radiology journals. He is the Treasurer for the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and board member of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT). He is a fellow of the AAPM (2007), ACR (2009), American College of Medical Physics (2011), and SCCT (2011).

Dr. Mahesh has been invited to be the United Nations-International Atomic Energy Agency (UN-IAEA) expert to participate in IAEA activities. Dr. Mahesh is the author of the textbook titled MDCT Physics: The Basics – Technology, Image Quality and Radiation Dose. He publishes and lectures extensively here in the United States and internationally in the area of MDCT technology, radiation doses in medical imaging, and other medical physics areas.

Dr. Mahesh is on the NCRP Council and was a member of NCRP Scientific Committee (SC) 6-2 that published NCRP Report No. 160, Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the United States Population. He is the co-chair of NCRP SC 4-9 on Medical Exposure of the U.S. population.

mahadevappa mahesh

MayerD

DONALD M. MAYER

MayerD

recently retired (2015) from Indian Point Energy Center as Director of Indian Point Unit 1 and Special Projects. Mr. Mayer has more than 30 y of experience in the nuclear power industry. He joined the New York Power Authority (NYPA) in 1982 as a radiological engineer at Indian Point Unit 3 and worked in the radiation protection field for 20 y, including as Radiation Protection Manager. Mr. Mayer also spent approximately 2 y as General Manager of Unit 3 plant services under NYPA where he was responsible for site security, emergency planning, radiation protection licensing, and corrective action programs. Since that time Mayer has lead various major projects for Entergy including site integration after Entergy’s plant acquisition of Unit 2 and led the Unit 1 project culminating in the removal and dry storage of the spent fuel.

Mr. Mayer was named Director of Unit 1 in 2007. In 2008, at the culmination of the Indian Point Independent Safety Evaluation, he was named as the senior management sponsor for the response and implementation of recommendations.

Mr. Mayer holds a BS in Biology from Syracuse University, an MS in Radiological Science from the University of Lowell, a Master’s in Business Administration from Mt. St. Mary’s College, and is a Certified Health Physicist.

donald m. mayer

McBurney

RUTH E. MCBURNEY

McBurney

is the Executive Director of the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors. In that position, she manages and directs the administrative office for the organization. Prior to taking that position in January 2007, she was the Manager of the Radiation Safety Licensing Branch at the Texas Department of State Health Services, culminating 25 y of service in the Texas Radiation Control Program, most of which involved licensing and standards development.

Ms. McBurney has served on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Advisory Committee on the Medical Use of Isotopes and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's National Mammography Quality Assurance Advisory Committee. She is currently serving as a Member of NCRP, and is also on the Board of Directors. She served as a consultant to the International Atomic Energy Agency in the categorization of radiation sources and recently served on a committee of the National Academy of Science regarding replacement technologies for high-risk radiation sources. She has also been a U.S. delegate to the International Radiation Protection Association's 10th, 11th, 12th, and 13th Congresses.

Ms. McBurney holds a BS in Biology from Henderson State University in Arkansas and an MS in Radiation Sciences from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. She is also certified in comprehensive health physics by the American Board of Health Physics.

Ruth E. McBurney

MillerCharles

CHARLES W. MILLER

MillerCharles

joined the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in January 1992. He is currently Chief of the Radiation Studies Branch, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health. In this position he provides leadership for the agency's radiological emergency response and consequence management efforts. Previously, Dr. Miller worked with the Illinois Department of Nuclear Safety, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Anderson (Indiana) University. His primary area of expertise is the transport and dose assessment of radionuclides released to the atmosphere, and other facets of environmental radiological dose assessment. He has authored or coauthored over 100 journal articles, laboratory reports, and meeting papers. Dr. Miller is a member of NCRP and a Fellow of the Health Physics Society. Dr. Miller holds a BS in Physics/Math from Ball State University, an MS in Meteorology from the University of Michigan, and a PhD in Bionucleonics (Health Physics) from Purdue University.

charles w. miller

Miller D

DONALD L. MILLER

Miller D

is the Chief Medical Officer for Radiological Health in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Center for Devices and Radiological Health. He was previously Professor of Radiology and Radiological Sciences at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland and an adjunct investigator in the Radiation Epidemiology Branch of the National Cancer Institute.

Dr. Miller earned a BA in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry from Yale University in 1972 and an MD from the New York University School of Medicine in 1976. He holds Board certification in both Diagnostic Radiology and Interventional Radiology. Prior to joining FDA, he engaged in the clinical practice of interventional radiology for nearly three decades.

He is a Fellow of the Society of Interventional Radiology and of the American College of Radiology, and is an Honorary Member of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. He has served as a consultant to the International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Health Organization on issues related to radiation protection in medicine.

Dr. Miller was elected to NCRP in 2006. He serves currently as Co-Chair of Program Area Committee 4 (radiation protection in medicine), Chair of the Nominating Committee, and as a member or consultant to several scientific committees. He was Vice-Chair for NCRP Report No. 168 (Radiation Dose Management for X-Ray Guided Interventional Medical Procedures) and a consultant for NCRP Report No. 172 (Reference Levels and Achievable Doses in Medical and Dental Imaging: Recommendations for the United States).

He became a member of ICRP Committee 3 (Protection in Medicine) in 2010, and since 2013 has served as Vice-Chair of the Committee. He was an author of ICRP Publication 117 (Radiological Protection in Fluoroscopically Guided Procedures Performed Outside the Imaging Department) and Co-Chair for ICRP Publication 120 (Radiological Protection in Cardiology). He currently serves on three working parties of Committee 3.

Dr. Miller has authored more than 180 publications in peer-reviewed journals and more than 30 book chapters and reports. His research interests center on radiation protection in medicine, and include occupational radiation protection for interventional fluoroscopy, patient radiation doses and radiation protection in interventional procedures, and the development of U.S. national diagnostic reference levels for medical exposures.

donald l. miller

Musolino S

STEPHEN V. MUSOLINO

Musolino S

is a scientist in the Nonproliferation and National Security Department at the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. With more than 30 y of experience in Health Physics, his current research interests are in nonproliferation, counterterrorism, and planning for response to the consequences of radiological and nuclear terrorism. Since 1981, he has been part of the DOE Radiological Assistance Program as a Team Captain/Team Scientist and has been involved in developing radiological emergency response plans and procedures, as well as participating in a wide range of radiological and nuclear exercises and field deployments. During the Fukushima crisis, he was deployed in Japan as an Assessment Scientist with the DOE response team that was measuring the environmental consequences of the radioactive material released from the damaged nuclear power plants. Working with the first responder community in the New York metropolitan area, Dr. Musolino was involved with the development of guidance for response to the aftermath of a radiological dispersal device, and served on the scientific committee that developed NCRP Report No. 165, Responding to a Radiological or Nuclear Terrorism Incident: A Guide for Decision Makers. Earlier in his career at BNL, he was a member of the Marshall Islands Radiological Safety Program and participated in numerous field missions to monitor the populations living on islands affected by nuclear testing.

Dr. Musolino is a Fellow of the Health Physics Society, Distinguished Alumnus of Buffalo State College, and a member of the editorial board of the journal Health Physics. He earned a BS in engineering technology from Buffalo State College, an MS in nuclear engineering from Polytechnic Institute of New York University, and a PhD in health physics from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He is certified by the American Board of Health Physics.

stephen v. musolino

Napier-B

BRUCE A. NAPIER

Napier-B

is a Staff Scientist in the Radiological Science and Engineering Group at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington and has been for the past 35 y. Mr. Napier works with the development and operation of models concerned with the environmental transport of radiological and chemical contaminants. His expertise and experience lie in the areas of radiation dose reconstruction, computer modeling, environmental analysis, and human health risk analysis. He is an author of the widely-used GENII computer code. Mr. Napier was the Chief Scientist for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project that evaluated releases from the Hanford Site during production of plutonium.

He is now a Principal Investigator for the U.S./Russian Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research, working on the dose reconstructions at the Russian Mayak Production Association for both the workers at and the populations living near the points of atmospheric release and along the Techa River downstream. Mr. Napier is a member of the Board of Directors of NCRP, a committee member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board and the National Academy of Sciences, a Fellow of the Health Physics Society, and Chair of oversight panels for the National Cancer Institute's Chernobyl Studies.

bruce a. napier

NelsonG

GREGORY A. NELSON

NelsonG

earned his BS in chemistry from Caltech and his PhD in Cell and Developmental Biology at Harvard Medical School in 1979 where his thesis work was on the genetics of sex determination and spermatogenesis in the nematode C. elegans. During a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard he investigated regulation of cell surface distribution of immunoglobulin on lymphocytes and its control by the calcium regulator, calmodulin. He joined the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in 1982 where he became interested in the space radiation environment and developed C. elegans as a biodosimetry system for spaceflight applications. As principal investigator, he flew the nematode experiments using the European Space Agency's Biorack facility on shuttle missions STS-42 (1992) and STS-76 (1996). He has since participated in shuttle missions STS-108, -118 and -135 examining effects of spaceflight on the immune and nervous systems of mice as part of the commercial biotechnology technology mission experiments 1-3.

The spaceflight experiences led him to participate in a number of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) programmatic activities, including the design of a dedicated biological satellite (LifeSat) system. He joined Loma Linda University (LLU) in 1996 to direct its new radiobiology program and to develop the infrastructure needed to do space research with proton beams. As the LLU radiobiology program grew, he was able to maintain a modest research activity with C. elegans, and later began collaborations on projects that have investigated the effects of protons and charged particles on immune responses, thyroid cells in three-dimensional tissue models, microvasculature, and rodent behavior. More recently he served as principal investigator on two NASA program projects (NSCOR) team involving nine institutions that investigate how space-like radiation exposures produce time- and dose-dependent changes in the mouse brain.

He was a founding director of NASA's Space Radiation Summer School held at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and serves as a member of NCRP. He recently completed a NASA-funded study investigating genes regulating bystander effects in C. elegans in a study involving RNA interference screening and microbeam-based experiments in collaboration with Professors Leslie Braby and John Ford of Texas A&M University and was appointed Adjunct Professor of Nuclear Engineering at TAMU in 2008. Another ongoing study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy investigates the effects of low doses of gamma rays on adaptive immunity in the mouse. Dr. Nelson is currently Professor of Basic Sciences and Radiation Medicine at Loma Linda University.

gregory a. nelson
Newhauser,W

WAYNE D. NEWHAUSER

Newhauser,W

is the Director of the Medical and Health Physics Program at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, holder of the Dr. Charles M. Smith Chair in Medical Physics, and Chief of Physics at the Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center. He is a board certified and licensed medical physicist with specialization in advanced-technology radiotherapies. Dr. Newhauser is an expert in proton radiation therapy, dose reconstructions, and risk estimation and reduction. His current research projects seek to improve long-term outcomes of survivors of childhood and adult cancers. He and his multidisciplinary team of collaborators are known for their early use of Monte-Carlo methods and high-performance computing in proton therapy, including neutron shielding, treatment planning, and estimation of stray radiation exposures. He received the Innovation Excellence Award in 2012 in recognition of his laboratory's research involving in-silico clinical trials to compare advanced-technology radiotherapies.

Dr. Newhauser has published more than 85 peer-reviewed journal articles, leads federal research grants, and mentors graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. He has served in leadership roles in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the American Nuclear Society, and the Health Physics Society. He serves on the International Advisory Board of the journal Physics In Medicine and Biology and is a corresponding member of EURODOS. After receiving a BS in nuclear engineering and MS and PhD degrees medical physics from the University of Wisconsin, he worked at the German National Standards Laboratory, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

wayne d. newhauser

Noska Mike

Michael A. Noska

Noska Mikeis the Senior Advisor for Health Physics, the Agency Radiation Safety Officer, and the Team Lead for Radiological Emergency Response at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). He has been a health physicist with the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) for 21 y and has had multiple assignments at the National Institutes of Health and the FDA with a focus on internal radiation dosimetry and radiological emergency preparedness and response. Prior to joining the PHS, Captain Noska worked as a research assistant in radiopharmaceutical laboratories at Harvard Medical School and Duke University Medical Center developing radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of cancer. He received his MS from the University of North Carolina School of Public Health as a Department of Energy Applied Health Physics Fellow. Captain Noska is the current Chair of the Federal Advisory Team for the Environment, Food and Health and a member of the Federal Radiological Preparedness Coordinating Committee. He is also the Past Chair of the Environmental Health Officer Professional Advisory Committee to the U.S. Surgeon General and Past President of the Baltimore-Washington Chapter of the Health Physics Society. Captain Noska serves on several interagency committees and workgroups related to radiological emergency response. In 2011, he deployed to Japan as part of a team from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in support of the U.S. Ambassador following the Great Tohoku Earthquake and the nuclear crisis at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station.

Michael A. Noska

Paganetti H

HARALD PAGANETTI

Paganetti H

is the Director of Physics Research at the Department of Radiation Oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital and a Professor of Radiation Oncology at Harvard Medical School. He received his PhD in experimental nuclear physics in 1992 from the Rheinische-Friedrich-Wilhelms University in Bonn, Germany, and has been working in radiation therapy research on experimental as well as theoretical aspects since 1994. He is internationally recognized as an authority on proton therapy and specifically on Monte-Carlo simulations of dose and biological effects, the latter including modeling of clinical relative biological effectiveness as well as late effects. He has authored and co-authored more than 120 peer-reviewed publications and has edited a book on Proton Therapy Physics. For his research leadership he received the 2013 A. Clifford Barger Excellence in Mentoring Award from Harvard Medical School. Dr. Paganetti has been awarded numerous research grants from the National Cancer Institute.

He serves on the editorial boards for the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics as well as Technology in Cancer Research and Treatment. He is a member of numerous task groups and committees for various associations such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. Notably he is a member of the Radiation Physics Committee of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. From 2009 to 2012 he was the Science Chair of the International Organization for Medical Physics. He is also a member of the Radiation Therapeutics and Biology Study Section at the National Cancer Institute.

harald paganetti

Christopher N. Passmore

currently holds the position of Vice President of Dosimetry Services at Landauer. Mr. Passmore has more than 26 y of experience in all aspects of dosimetry and radiological protection fields. He is an internationally known expert in dosimetry, radiation monitoring, radiation field characterization, regulatory compliance, and accreditation programs. He has technical responsibility for Landauer’s world leading analytical dosimetry laboratory, including analysis, dose reporting, regulatory compliance, quality control, engineering, and manufacturing. Mr. Passmore also holds the positons of Landauer’s Head of the Approved Dosimetry Services in Canada, United Kingdom, and Ireland. He is a member of the Nagase-Landauer and Beijing – Landauer Board of Directors.

Mr. Passmore serves as a U.S. delegate and technical expert to the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) TC45 and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) TC85, where he has been involved in influencing and developing several critical dosimetry standards (IEC 62387, ISO 21099, ISO 15690, ISO 15382, and ISO 14146) and was recently appointed to an ISO Ad Hoc Committee to develop standards on Population Monitoring Following Radiological Accidents. In addition to international standard committees he also serves as a member of the Health Physics Society Standard Committee.

Prior to joining Landauer, Mr. Passmore worked for 10 y in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex managing external and internal dosimetry programs at Rocky Flats Plant (plutonium and uranium facility) and Pantex (nuclear weapon assembly/disassembly). Mr. Passmore was also appointed as assessor for the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program in 1993 and fulfilled this role until joining Landauer in the fall of 2000.

Mr. Passmore holds an MS degree in Health Physics from National Technological University, a BS in Nuclear Engineering from Arizona State University, and a BS degree in both Physics and Engineering from Illinois College. He is also certified in Comprehensive Health Physics by the American Board of Health Physics.

Christopher N. Passmore

DAVID J. PAWEL

Pawel D

is Statistician in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air. His current focus is a reassessment of the EPA radiogenic cancer risk estimates. He is a co-author of the "Blue Book" on EPA's most recent radiogenic risk models and an EPA technical report on its assessment of risks from radon in homes. In 2003, as the second Beebe Fellow, he studied methods to improve cancer-specific radiogenic risk estimates at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) in Hiroshima, Japan and the National Cancer Institute in 2004.

Dr. Pawel was a member of the RERF Statistics Department from 1992 to 1994. He is a member of NCRP and served on its committee on uncertainties in internal dose estimates. He has a BS in Mathematics from the College of William and Mary, an MS in Statistics from Rutgers University, and a PhD in Statistics from the University of Wyoming.

david j. pawel

Pryor-K

KATHRYN H. PRYOR

Pryor-K

has been a member of Program Area Committee (PAC) 2 since 2007 and a member of NCRP since 2010. She has served on Scientific Committees 2-4, 2-5, 2-7, 1-19, and 6-9. Ms. Pryor is currently on the NCRP Board of Directors and is Scientific Vice President of PAC 2. She received her BS in Biology in 1979 and MS in Radiological Sciences in 1981, both from the University of Washington.

Ms. Pryor currently holds the position of Chief Health Physicist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, and has provided management and technical support to the PNNL Radiation Protection Division since 1992. She also served as the Chief Radiological Engineer for the design of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Project. Ms. Pryor has previously held radiation protection technical support positions at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station and the Trojan Nuclear Plant, and was the Radiation Safety Officer at the University of Southern California Health Sciences Campus.

Ms. Pryor is a Fellow member of the Health Physics Society (HPS) and served as President-Elect, President, and Past President from 2010 to 2013. She is certified in comprehensive practice by the American Board of Health Physics (ABHP), and served on the ABHP both as a member and Chair from 1998 to 2002. Ms. Pryor was awarded the William McAdams Outstanding Service Award by ABHP in 2007 and the John P. Corley Meritorious Service Award by the Columbia Chapter of HPS in 2003.

kathryn h. pryor

No ImageMark J. Rivard

Salame-Alfie

ADELA SALAME-ALFIE

Salame-AlfieA

is a Senior Service Fellow in the Radiation Studies Branch in the National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prior to this appointment, Dr. Salame-Alfie spent 22 y with the New York State Department of Health in various capacities including Director of the Division of Environmental Health Investigation, Director of Preparedness for the Center for Environmental Health, and Director of the Bureau of Environmental Radiation Protection.

Dr. Salame-Alfie is a member of NCRP and co-chairs the SC 3-1 charged with developing dosimetry guidance for radiation emergency workers. She is a Lifetime member of the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors where she served as Chair and member of the Board of Directors, and chaired several committees. She is a Fellow member of the Health Physics Society.

Dr. Salame-Alfie has extensive experience in radiological emergency preparedness and has published and co-authored many publications on the subject, including the Handbook for Responding to a Radiological Dispersal Device – First Responder Guide.

Dr. Salame-Alfie obtained her Master’s and Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York.

Adela Salame-Alfie

Samei E

EHSAN SAMEI

Samei E

is a tenured Professor of Radiology, Medical Physics, Biomedical Engineering, Physics, and Electrical and Computer Engineering at Duke University, where he also serves as the director of Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories and the founding director of the Clinical Imaging Physics Group. His expertise includes x-ray imaging, theoretical imaging models, simulation methods, and experimental techniques in medical image formation, analysis, assessment, display and perception. His current research includes methods to develop image quality and dose metrics that are clinically relevant and that can be used to design and utilize advanced imaging techniques towards optimum interpretive, quantitative and molecular performance. The main modalities of interest are computed tomography and tomosynthesis for breast, lung and abdominal imaging applications. He has been the recipient of 24 extramural grants, and has over 140 referred papers. He is certified by the American Board of Radiology, is a fellow of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), and is a fellow of the International Society of Optical Engineering (SPIE).

He was the founding Director of the Graduate Studies of the Duke Medical Physics Graduate Program. He has held leadership positions in the AAPM, the SPIE, and the Society of Directors of Academic Medical Physics Programs, and was appointed to the NCRP and serves on Program Area Committee 4.

ehsan samei

Scroggs

DEBRA M. SCROGGS

Scroggs

is Manager of Environmental Radiation Monitoring and Assessment at the Department of Health, Olympia, Washington. She received a B.S. in Physics and an M.S. in Radiological Sciences from the University of Washington. She is certified by the American Board of Health Physics. Her interests include policy and government relations and homeland security. She is a member and past chair of the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors and received their James Miller Award. She is also a member of the Health Physics Society and has served on several committees.

debra m. scroggs

SeibertJA

J. ANTHONY SEIBERT

SeibertJA

is Professor of Radiology at the University of California (UC) Davis School of Medicine in Sacramento, California. He received a PhD in Radiological Sciences from UC Irvine in 1982, specializing in quantitative digital fluoroscopic imaging. Directly thereafter, he took a faculty position at UC Davis Medical Center, pursuing digital imaging research, physics education efforts for graduate students and radiology residents, as well as quality control for medical imaging equipment in Diagnostic Radiology.

He currently is Associate Chair of Imaging Informatics for the Department of Radiology, with continuing academic interests in digital mammography, computed tomography, interventional radiology, imaging informatics, and radiation dose tracking, assessment, and reporting. Former president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) in 2011 and current Trustee of the American Board of Radiology, Dr. Seibert has served and continues to interact with many professional committees in regards to medical imaging issues and presenting technical / educational events for the AAPM, International Atomic Energy Agency, and other professional societies. For NCRP, he is a member of Program Area Committee 4. As a co-author of The Essential Physics of Medical Imaging textbook for diagnostic physics education, Dr. Seibert continues with the development of cutting edge imaging technologies and medical physics education to improve the state of imaging science for the betterment of patient care.

j. anthony seibert

Sgouros G

GEORGE SGOUROS

Sgouros G

is Professor of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Director of Radiopharmaceutical Dosimetry Section of the Division of Nuclear Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine. He has been principal investigator or program leader on numerous grants with over 20 y experience in modeling and dosimetry of internally administered radionuclides with a particular emphasis on patient-specific dosimetry, alpha-particle dosimetry, and mathematical modeling of radionuclide therapy. Dr. Sgouros' laboratory is currently engaged in preclinical research investigating targeted alpha-emitter therapy of metastatic cancer. He is author on more than 100 peer-reviewed articles, as well as several book chapters and review articles. He is chairman of the Medical Internal Radionuclide Dose Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine, as well as steering committee member, of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, Task Group on Internal Emitter Dosimetry.

He has served as chairman of the Dosimetry and Radiobiology Panel at a U.S. Department of Energy Workshop on alpha-emitters in medical therapy and, in the early 1990s, provided the physics/dosimetry support for the first Food and Drug Administration-approved human trial of targeted alpha-emitter therapy. He is also a member of the scientific advisory board of AREVA Med (Bethesda, Maryland), which is developing 212Pb-based alpha-emitters for targeted cancer therapy. Program areas of interest: medicine; dosimetry and measurement; education, risk communication, and outreach.

george sgouros

Shingleton-K

Kathleen L. Shingleton

Shingleton-K

has been employed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for more than 35 y and is currently the Radiation Safety Program Technical Leader in the Environment, Safety, and Health Directorate. She is responsible for developing a comprehensive, compliant and effective radiation safety program for LLNL, which serves as a national resource of scientific, technical and engineering capability with a special focus on national security. Over the years, LLNL’s mission has been broadened to encompass strategic defense, energy, the environment, biomedicine, technology transfer, education, counter-terrorism, and emergency response. Support of these operations requires the use of a wide range of radiation-generating devices (e.g., x-ray machines, accelerators, electron-beam welders) and radioactive material. The types of radioactive materials range from tritium to transuranics and the quantities range from nanocuries to kilocuries. In addition to her work at LLNL, Ms. Shingleton has been involved with both the Health Physics Society (HPS) and the American Academy of Health Physics (AAHP) over many years, including serving recently as the AAHP President and currently as the HPS Treasurer. Other positions included HPS Director (2005 to 2008); AAHP Secretary (2002 to 2004); American Board of Health Physics (ABHP) Part II (1997 to 2001) and Part I (1992 to 1996) exam panels; HPS Venues Committee chair (1995 to 1999); and numerous positions in the Northern California Chapter of the HPS. In 2007, she was selected as a Fellow of the Health Physics Society.

Kathleen L. Shingleton

Simon S

STEVEN L. SIMON

Simon S

received a BS in Physics from the University of Texas, an MS in Radiological Physics from the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in Dallas, and a PhD in Radiological Health Sciences from Colorado State University. Early in his career, he worked in medical physics and was the first treatment planner for clinical trials of treatments of solid tumors with negative pi-mesons at the Los Alamos Physics Meson Facility. Later specializing in environmental radioactivity, he directed the first nationwide monitoring program of the Marshall Islands for residual contamination from nuclear testing. He also participated in the radiological monitoring of numerous other nuclear test sites worldwide including Johnston Island, French Polynesia, and Algeria and has lead, or participated in, health risk studies of fallout exposures in Utah, the Marshall Islands, and Kazakhstan.

In 2000, Dr. Simon joined the National Cancer Institute's Radiation Epidemiology Branch as an expert in dose reconstruction and presently heads the Dosimetry Unit in that group. Steve is a member of NCRP and has been an Associate Editor of Health Physics for 20 y. In 2011 during the Fukushima crisis, Steve was deployed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to the U.S. Embassy in Japan to assist with the protection of American citizens.

steven l. simon

Spelic D

David C. Spelic

Spelic Dis a physicist with the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Center for Devices and Radiological Health. On his arrival at the FDA in 1994, Dr. Spelic became involved with the Agency’s implementation of the Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA), particularly focusing on mammography physics testing and the training of MQSA inspectors.

Presently Dr. Spelic conducts premarket reviews of diagnostic x-ray devices, and directs most technical aspects of the Nationwide Evaluation of X-Ray Trends (NEXT) program, an FDA collaboration with the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors to document trends in patient dose and image quality for selected diagnostic x-ray exams and procedures.

David C. Spelic

StoryM

MICHAEL D. STORY

StoryM

is a professor at the University of Texas (UT) Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. Dr. Story earned his PhD from Colorado State University. He holds the David M. Pistenmaa, M.D., Ph.D. Distinguished Chair in Radiation Oncology, serves as Vice-Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology, Chief of the Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, and Director of the Genomics Shared Resource of the Simmons Cancer Center. Dr. Story also serves on the editorial board of the International Journal of Particle Therapy and has served on a number of review panels for the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and other entities. He also serves as a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for Galera Therapeutics.

Dr. Story has taught for several sessions of the NASA Space Radiation Summer School, directs the radiobiology course for the radiation oncology resident program, and lectures in 'omics technologies for the Graduate School of Biological Sciences at UT Southwestern. Dr. Story's research is focused on four areas associated with radiation exposure. The first area is the identification of genomic or epigenomic factors that predict or are prognostic for the radioresponse in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The second area is the combinatorial application of radiation with other biologic- or chemo-agents, as well as low frequency electromagnetic fields to alter the response of both tumors (radiosensitization) or normal tissues (radioprotection).

The third area is characterizing the radioresponse of lung and liver tissues to high linear-energy transfer radiation exposures, including the development of biomarkers of carcinogenic risk in these tissues. Lastly, Dr. Story is heading the development of research programs in charged particle radiotherapy at UT Southwestern. Dr. Story's research is funded by the NCI, NASA, the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, and industry.

michael d. story

Stram D

DANIEL O. STRAM

Stram D

is Professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California. He received his PhD in statistics from Temple University in 1983 and served as a postdoctoral fellow in the Biostatistics Department of the Harvard School of Public Health from 1984 to 1986. From 1986 to 1989 he was a research associate at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima, Japan.

Dr. Stram's main areas of research are in the statistical problems that arise in the design, analysis and interpretation of epidemiological studies of cancer and other diseases. His work on radiation epidemiology studies includes: (1) helping to characterize the statistical nature of errors in dose estimates for the atomic-bomb survivor study, (2) developing a multi-level variance components model for the dosimetry used in the Colorado Plateau uranium miners cohort for the purpose of better understanding dose and dose-rate effects in those data, and (3) characterizing study power and sample size issues in epidemiologic studies in which a complex dosimetry system is used to estimate radiation dose. Besides the field of radiation epidemiology his past and current research has focused on statistical issues relevant to clinical trials of treatment for pediatric cancer, nutritional epidemiology studies, and to studies of the genetics of complex diseases. He is an elected fellow of the American Statistical Association and has authored or co-authored over 200 peer reviewed articles.

daniel o. stram

Sturchio-G

Glenn M. Sturchio

Sturchio-G

Dr. Sturchio is the Radiation Safety Officer for the Mayo Clinic facilities in Jacksonville, Florida and Rochester, Minnesota supporting the use of radiation sources in the clinical, research and education areas. In addition, he is an Assistant Professor of Physiology in the Mayo College of Medicine; his teaching duties include two courses in the Graduate School and a course in the School of Health Sciences.

Dr. Sturchio is the Section Manager, Medical and Operational Health Physics on the ANSI N13 committee that develops American National Standards Institute / Health Physics Society standards. Dr. Sturchio received his PhD from the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota and is certified in the comprehensive practice of health physics by the American Board of Health Physics.

Glenn M. Sturchio

Sutlief_S

STEVEN G. SUTLIEF

Sutlief_S

received his PhD in experimental particle physics from the University of Washington and subsequently completed a post-doctoral fellowship in radiation therapy medical physics at the University of Washington with research in intensity modulated radiation therapy. Since then he has been chief medical physicist at the Veterans Affairs (VA) Puget Sound Health Care System in Seattle and an affiliate faculty member in the University of Washington School of Medicine. He actively participates in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, where he has served on many committees and on several task group reports. Dr. Sutlief has worked to advance radiation therapy within the VA, including agency-wide radiotherapy equipment modernization, radiotherapy device interconnectivity, consultation for the VA National Health Physics Program, participation in several investigations, and development of qualification standards for therapeutic medical physicists.

He has coauthored 45 articles and book chapters related to therapeutic medical physics. Dr. Sutlief developed and taught the physics curriculum for the Bellevue College Medical Dosimetry program. He has served as a consultant to the International Atomic Energy Agency and as a member of the Radiation Oncology planning group for the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise. Recently Dr. Sutlief was a Co-organizer for the AAPM Summer School on Quality and Safety in Radiation Therapy and was a faculty member for the Veterans Health Administration Biennial Conference on Radiation Oncology. He is currently an NCRP Council member.

steven g. sutlief

TaylorT

TAMMY P. TAYLOR

TaylorTis the Chief Operating Officer of the National Security Directorate at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). She leads the mission execution, capability development, and project management of the directorate of three divisions and four project management offices representing 1,000 personnel and an annual budget of approximately $500 M. Prior to joining PNNL in the summer of 2013, Dr. Taylor served in a number of positions over 14 y at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) including the Deputy Associate Director of Chemistry, Life and Earth Sciences, the Division Leader of Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation, a group leader, project leader, staff member and Director's Postdoctoral Research Fellow. From early 2007 to mid 2010 she was an Intergovernmental Personnel Act assignee from LANL in the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in the Executive Office of the President.

She managed the national science and technology portfolio on nuclear defense issues including nonproliferation, detection, render safe, and attribution, as well as nuclear detonation response and recovery issues such as preparedness, planning, medical countermeasures, decontamination, and long-term recovery within the National Security and International Affairs Directorate of OSTP for Dr. John Holdren and Dr. Jack Marburger, Science Advisors to President Obama and President Bush, respectively. Dr. Taylor has conducted research and performed program development activities on topics related to radiological/nuclear threat reduction and environmental restoration. She has expertise working with the emergency responder community to identify needs in support of radiological and nuclear terrorism preparedness and adapt traditional emergency response to response involving terrorism threats.

Her research prior to September 11, 2011 focused on environmental remediation of groundwater and safe handling, fate, and remediation of beryllium. Dr. Taylor has an MS and PhD in Environmental Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her undergraduate degree in Civil Engineering is from New Mexico State University. She is a member of NCRP and a long-time member and supporter of the American Nuclear Society, the American Society of Testing and Materials, the Health Physics Society, and the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management.

tammy p. taylor

Timins J

JULIE E.K. TIMINS

Timins J

is a Diagnostic Radiologist, board-certified in General Radiology and in Nuclear Medicine. Her medical practice has been varied, including Chair of Nuclear Medicine at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Lyons, New Jersey; 10 y as Staff Radiologist at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, New Brunswick, New Jersey; 11 y in an inner-city hospital in Jersey City; and over 4 y in a suburban out-patient imaging facility specializing in Mammography and Women's Imaging in Morristown, New Jersey. Dr. Timins is Chair of the New Jersey Commission on Radiation Protection, and sits on the New Jersey Radiologic Technology Board of Examiners. She served on the NCRP Board of Directors, and received a Commendation for Outstanding Service on the 2010 Annual Meeting Program Committee – "Communication of Radiation Benefits and Risks in Decision Making." She is past president of the Radiological Society of New Jersey and recipient of that organization's Gold Medal Award. Dr. Timins was honored as a Fellow of the American College of Radiology, and has served that organization on the Council Steering Committee and as Chair of Practice Guidelines and Technical Standards, on the Commission on Quality and Safety.

She is a recipient of the Advisory Committee Service Award of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, in recognition of distinguished service on the National Mammography Quality Assurance Advisory Committee. The American Association for Women Radiologists has honored Dr. Timins with the Professional Leadership Award for Mid Career/Senior Faculty and the President's Award. In appreciation of service as an Affiliate Member of the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, she was presented with the Board of Directors Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Field of Radiation Protection, for participation on the H-30 Task Force and development of the White Paper on Bone Densitometry.

Julie E.K. Timins

Toohey_D

RICHARD E. TOOHEY

Toohey_D

received his PhD in physics from the University of Cincinnati in 1973. He spent the first part of his career at Argonne National Laboratory in both research and operational health physics. He recently retired from Oak Ridge Associated Universities, where he served as director of the Radiation Internal Dose Information Center, as Senior Health Physicist for the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site, Director of Dose Reconstruction Programs, and Associate Director of the Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program. He is currenly employed by M.H. Chew and Associates.

He is certified in comprehensive practice by the American Board of Health Physics, was the 2008 to 2009 President of the Health Physics Society, is a member and director of NCRP, Treasurer of the International Radiation Protection Association, and Chair of the Scientific Advisory Committee for the U.S. Transuranium and Uranium Registries. His specialties are internal radiation dosimetry, dose reconstruction, and radiological emergency response. Dr. Toohey has 125 publications in the open literature, and is a retired Lt. Colonel, U.S. Army Reserve.

richard e. toohey

WeilM

MICHAEL M. WEIL

WeilM

is a professor in the Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences at Colorado State University (CSU). His research, which takes advantage of murine models of radiation carcinogenesis and leukemogenesis, is focused on understanding how radiation exposure can lead to cancer and why some individuals may be more susceptible than others. At CSU, Dr. Weil teaches a graduate level course in cancer genetics and lectures in courses on cancer biology, environmental carcinogenesis, principles of radiation biology, and the pathobiology of laboratory animals.

Dr. Weil earned his PhD in Microbiology from the University of Texas at Austin and was trained in cancer genetics and radiation biology in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Biochemistry and the Department of Experimental Radiotherapy at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Weil is a Radiation Research Society council member and has served on National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Defense, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration grant review panels.

michael m. weil

Jeffrey J. Whicker

Jeffrey J. Whicker

Whicker-J

Jeffrey Whicker has worked at Los Alamos National Laboratory for over 25 y. He received a PhD in Environmental and Radiological Health Science from Colorado State University and is certified by the American Board of Health Physics. He is an author or co-author on over 125 scientific publications, invited talks, book chapters, and presentations mostly on indoor and outdoor radiological air quality and measurement that span issues ranging from worker protection, homeland security, public risk assessment, and environmental quality. His body of work has been cited in peer-reviewed journals over 500 times. Dr. Whicker served on the Editorial Board for the journal Radiation Protection Dosimetry and as President of the Environmental/Radon Section of the Health Physics Society.

Jeffrey J. Whicker

Whipple C

CHRIS G. WHIPPLE

Whipple C

is a Principal in Environ International's Emeryville, California office. His expertise is with the management of risks to health and the environment. Major emphases of his work have been with risks associated with radioactive materials, including radioactive wastes, with hazardous air pollutants, and with environmental mercury. He has served on numerous national committees to study and advise on radioactive waste management, including committees of the National Academy of Sciences, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and NCRP, of which he is an elected member. He currently serves on NCRP's Program Area Committee on Environmental Radiation and Radioactive Waste, on its Advisory Committee on Public Policy, and on its Nominations Committee. He was elected to membership in the National Academy of Engineering in 2001 and is a designated National Associate of the National Academies. Dr. Whipple has chaired the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Board on Radioactive Waste Management, and NAS committees on the Review of the Hanford Site's Environmental Remediation Science and Technology Plan, Models in the Regulatory Decision Process, Medical Isotope Production without Highly Enriched Uranium, and the Committee on Risk-Based Approaches for Securing the U.S. Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Complex. Dr. Whipple is also co-chair of the Academies' Report Review Committee.

He was a charter member of the Society for Risk Analysis and served as its second president. In 1990, he received the Society's outstanding service award. He is a Fellow of the American Academy for the Advancement of Science and of the Society for Risk Analysis. His experience prior to joining Environ includes positions as Vice President of ICF Consulting, Vice President of ICF Kaiser International, and Technical Manager for Environmental Risk Assessment of Electric Power Research Institute's Environment Division. He holds a BS in engineering science from Purdue University, and an MS and PhD, also in engineering science, from the California Institute of Technology. In 2004, he received Purdue's Distinguished Engineering Alumni Award.

chris g. whipple

Whitcomb Robert

ROBERT C. WHITCOMB, JR.

Whitcomb Robert

joined the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in June 1993. He is currently the Lead Physical Scientist with the Radiation Studies Branch, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, National Center for Environmental Health. In this position he serves as Radiation Subject Matter Expert and CDC Spokesperson for technical and public health issues related to environmental radiation and nuclear/radiological emergency response. Previously, Dr. Whitcomb worked with the Illinois Department of Nuclear Safety. His primary area of expertise is the assessment of radionuclides released to the environment and the impact on public health. He has authored or coauthored numerous journal articles and has lectured nationally and internationally about the public health response in nuclear/radiological emergencies.

Dr. Whitcomb is a member of NCRP and the Health Physics Society. He is certified in comprehensive practice by the American Board of Health Physics, and served on the Board of Directors of the Health Physics Society (2004 to 2007). Dr. Whitcomb holds a BS in Biology from Florida Southern College, an MS and a PhD in Environmental Engineering Sciences from the University of Florida.

robert c. whitcomb, jr.

Jessica S. Wieder

is a member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Center for Radiation Information and Outreach and is the senior public information officer for EPA's Radiological Emergency Response Team. Ms. Wieder was part of the team tasked with communicating about EPA's efforts and radiation levels in the United States during the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. She has facilitated international panels on public communication about radiation risks after terrorist incidents and was part of the contingency planning team for the 2011 launch of the Mars Science Laboratory. In 2010, Ms. Wieder was detailed to Federal Emergency Management Agency's Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives Branch, where she helped establish their Improvised Nuclear Device Response and Recovery Program and created the intergovernmental Nuclear/Radiological Communications Working Group. With her guidance, this group developed the nuclear detonation messaging document Improvised Nuclear Device Response and Recovery: Communicating in the Immediate Aftermath. She was also the lead author for the communications chapter for the second edition of the White House's Planning Guidance for Response to a Nuclear Detonation. In 2013, she was awarded EPA's Exemplary Customer Service Award for her leadership in enabling all levels of government to provide quick, effective communications to the American people in response to large-scale radiological emergencies.

Jessica S. Wieder

Williams J

JACQUELINE P. WILLIAMS

Williams J

completed her undergraduate degrees at the University of Nottingham, followed by her post-doctoral training in radiation biology at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, University of London, U.K. Shortly after completing her studies, she joined the faculty at the University of Rochester, New York, in the department of Radiation Oncology, and recently in the department of Environmental Medicine. Since that time, Dr. Williams has accrued more than 25 y of experience in radiation biology and related fields and has been involved in a wide range of research areas, including clinically-related oncologic studies and clinical trials, tumor blood flow studies, long-term carcinogenic studies, and pharmacological and toxicological projects.

Her current research interests involve identifying mechanisms that underlie the initiation and progression of radiation-induced late normal tissue effects as a consequence of high-dose clinical treatment/accidental exposures or the lower doses associated with either space travel or mass exposures with the goal of developing protection or mitigation strategies. Dr. Williams has served as the President of the Radiation Research Society, the Research Chair on the Board of the American Society for Radiation Oncology, and has been elected to, and is currently serving as, Council Member to the International Association for Radiation Research.

jacqueline p. williams

Woloschak-G

GAYLE E. WOLOSCHAK

Woloschak-G

is a Professor of Radiation Oncology and Radiology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. She and her group have been involved in studies of molecular consequences of radiation exposure, late tissue effects associated with radiation, and the use of radiation-inducible nanomaterials for cancer imaging and therapy. Dr. Woloschak also teaches radiation biology to radiation oncology and radiology residents, cardiology trainees, and graduate students and manages the Advanced Grant Writing Workshop for the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

She earned her PhD in medical sciences from the University of Toledo (Ohio) and did post-doctoral studies in molecular biology at the Mayo Clinic. She has served on review panels for various federal agencies including the National Institutes of Health, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the U.S. Department of Energy, RSNA, the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, and others. She is currently an associated editor for Radiation Research, the International Journal of Radiation Biology, PLOS One, and Nanomedicine. She is a member of NCRP Program Area Committee 1, has served on organizational committees for several NCRP meetings, and has been involved in committees for several NCRP reports. She is currently Vice-President Elect for the Radiation Research Society.

gayle e. woloschak

Xu G

X. GEORGE XU

Xu G

is a Professor of Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, New York. He received a PhD in nuclear engineering from Texas A&M University in 1994 before joining RPI. Since 2011, he has been the head of RPI's Nuclear Engineering Program involving 20 faculty/staff members, 160 undergraduate/graduate students, and two major nuclear research laboratories: the Gaerttner Linear Accelerator and the Walthousen Reactor Critical Facility. In addition to the faculty appointment at RPI, Dr. Xu also served from 1995 to 2000 as the Director of Office of Radiation and Nuclear Safety/Institute Radiation Safety Officer, responsible for the development and management of a comprehensive radiation and nuclear safety program at RPI, including operational radiation safety, nuclear instrumentation, compliance with federal and state regulations, environmental health, and nuclear security. In his research, Dr. Xu is internationally known for pioneering work on radiation dosimetry using computational phantoms (stylized, voxel, and BREP phantoms) and Monte-Carlo simulations. Since 1995, Dr. Xu has attracted and managed a total of $15M worth of external funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Institutes of Health, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, as well as private-sector industry as the principal investigator.

His research projects cover broad topics in nuclear contamination characterization, radiation protection of workers in nuclear power plants, modeling of complex reactor and accelerator systems, medical imaging and radiotherapy involving x rays, electrons and protons. In 2012, he led the projects to develop a computed tomography dose reporting software called VirtualDose and a new Monte-Carlo radiation transport code called Archer that utilizes hardware accelerators such as NVIDIA's GPU and INTEL's Xeon Phi. Mostly working with his former graduate students (15 PhD and 10 MS), Dr. Xu has authored/coauthored 140 peer-reviewed papers and chapters, 250 conference abstracts, 90 invited seminars/presentations, and several software packages. His 2000 paper on the VIP-Man phantom was one of the most cited paper in the field of computational phantoms (http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=dMkZjf8AAAAJ&hl=en). He cofounded the Consortium of Computational Human Phantoms (www.virtualphantoms.org) and coedited the book entitled "Handbook of Anatomical Models for Radiation Dosimetry" involving 60 authors from 13 countries. He serves on the editorial board of numerous journals including Medical Physics, Physics In Medicine and Biology, and Radiation Protection Dosimetry. He organized the International Workshop on Computational Phantoms for Radiation Protection, Imaging and Radiotherapy, in Beijing in 2011 and then in Zurich in 2013.

Dr. Xu is a member of American Nuclear Society (ANS) (life member and fellow), American Association of Physicists in Medicine (fellow), Health Physics Society (fellow), and Council on Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards (past president). He was elected to serve as a Council member of NCRP in 2008, and a member of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board (SAB) Radiation Advisory Committee in 2012. Dr. Xu received numerous awards including the NSF/CAREER Award, Rensselaer Research Excellence Award, ANS Best-Paper Award, Journal of Physics in Medicine and Biology Best-Paper Award, and ANS/RPSD Professional Excellence Award.

x. george xu

Yoder C

R. CRAIG YODER

Yoder C

has directed Landauer's technical activities relating to radiation dosimetry, particularly for applications in radiation protection, since joining Landauer in 1983. Additionally, he oversees subsidiary and partner businesses located in Australia, Brazil, China, France, Mexico, Japan, Sweden and Turkey.

An internationally known expert in radiation monitoring, Dr. Yoder led Landauer's transition from film and thermoluminescent dosimetry technology to optically stimulated luminescence, an assignment that required strategic planning and direction in areas spanning scientific research, product development, manufacturing, laboratory operations and marketing. From 1993 to 2001, he was Vice President of Operations and managed Landauer's manufacturing and analytical laboratory activities in addition to overseeing research and development programs.

Dr. Yoder is a member of NCRP and former President of the Council on Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards. He has served on several national and international committees to develop dosimetry standards. He was a member of a National Research Council committee that examined the accuracy of film badge measurements made during atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. He currently heads the Advisory Committee for the School of Health Sciences at Purdue University.

Dr. Yoder earned his MS and PhD degrees in Bionucleonics at Purdue University and received a BS in Pre-Medicine from Davidson College. He also completed the Executive Program at Stanford University. He is Certified in Comprehensive Health Physics by the American Board of Health Physics.

r. craig yoder

Zeitlin C

CARY ZEITLIN

Zeitlin C

is a Principal Science in the Space Science Division of Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), headquartered in San Antonio, Texas. Dr. Zeitlin has been at SwRI since 2008, working on the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) aboard the Curiosity Mars rover and a newer version of RAD for the International Space Station. Dr. Zeitlin received his BS from the University of California Berkeley in 1981 and his PhD in experimental high-energy particle physics from University of California Davis in 1988. His PhD research and postdoctoral work were done at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), where he studied two-photon interactions and decays of the Z boson.

Dr. Zeitlin moved from SLAC to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in 1991 to join an experimental nuclear physics group working for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to make ground-based measurements relevant to the transport of cosmic radiation through shielding materials and tissue. This began an association with NASA's programs in space radiation physics and biology that continues to the present. Dr. Zeitlin's current research interests are in the analysis of flight data returned from RAD and other space-borne detectors, as well as the development of improved compact spectrometers and dosimeters for spaceflight.

cary zeitlin

(as of March 7, 2017)

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Last modified: May 10, 2017