NCRP

Administrative Committees

Budget and Finance Committee

The Budget and Finance Committee is responsible for the development of the annual budget which, for the succeeding year, is submitted to the Board of Directors for action in December of the current year. Current members are:

WILLIAM E. KENNEDY, JR.

WILLIAM E. KENNEDY, JR.

Kennedy-W

has extensive experience as a project manager, task leader, and individual contributor covering a broad range of health physics and nuclear engineering topics. He received his BS and MS degrees in Nuclear Engineering from Kansas State University. Mr. Kennedy has been involved in the development of environmental pathway and radiation dosimetry models used to assess potential health and environmental impacts that resulted from releases of radionuclides to the environment.

He specializes in the use of these models in environmental dose reconstruction, radioactive materials transport, radioactive waste disposal, and evaluation of nuclear facility operating practices. Over the past 37 y, Mr. Kennedy has led and contributed to a variety of projects for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the U.S. Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, and private industry. He has been involved with development of the technical basis for revised standards and regulations, and serves as the chair of ANSI/HPS N13.12, Surface and volume Radioactivity Standards for Clearance. He served as a consultant to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna, Austria, and was a member of the IAEA Advisory Groups to evaluate the Derivation of Exempt Quantities for Application to Terrestrial Waste Disposal and Derivation of Exempt Quantities for Recycle of Materials from Nuclear Facilities.

He was an invited lecturer for IAEA training courses on Management of Radioactive Waste from Nuclear Power Plants at Argonne National Laboratory; on Safety Assessment Modeling for Low and Intermediate Radwastes in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and in Cairo, Egypt; and on Environmental Monitoring in Kiev, Ukraine. In 1990, he received the Health Physics Society's (HPS) prestigious Elda E. Anderson Award. He served as a member of the HPS Board of Directors from 1998 through 2001 and was selected as a fellow of the society in 2002. He was a member of the U.S. delegation to the 10th Congress of the International Radiation Protection Association in Hiroshima, Japan.

william e. kennedy, jr. , Chair

Willie O. Harris

is the Director, Radiation Protection for Exelon Nuclear. In his current role he is responsible to develop the governance and provide oversight of the radiation protection programs for the largest operator of nuclear power plants in the United States. He has over 35 y of broad-based experience in commercial nuclear power plants, which includes over 25 y in supervisory and management positions. He holds a bachelor’s degree in radiation protection and a master degree in business administration. He is a Certified Health Physicist and a registered radiation protection Technologist and holds a senior reactor operator certification. He continues to serve several industry committees which includes the Scientific Advisory Committee for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Low Dose Research, the EPRI Technical Advisory Committee, and the World Nuclear Association Radiation Protection Working Group.

Willie O. Harris

JOHN J. LANZA

is the Director of the Florida Department of Health in Escambia County (FDOH-EC). Dr. Lanza is a Board-certified pediatrician with a PhD in Medical Radiation Physics from the University of Florida. Since 2001, he has been the Public Health and Medical co-chair for the Florida Department of Law Enforcement's Domestic Security Task Force Northwest Florida. Before his FDOH-EC position, Dr. Lanza worked as a pediatric emergency department physician in Lakeland, Florida and was in private pediatric practice in Longwood, Florida. Dr. Lanza is a fellow of the America Academy of Pediatrics, a past president of the Escambia County Medical Society (2004), a member of the American Medical Association, and the Florida Medical Association (FMA), where he was the chair of the FMA Council on Public Health for 8 y. He is a founding board member of the Florida Public Health Institute. In addition, he is a member of the Florida Chapter of the Health Physics Society and the national Health Physics Society where he serves as past president of their Homeland Security Section and a member of the medical response subcommittee. Dr. Lanza was recently elected to the Health Physics Society Board of Directors. In 2005, he was appointed as a Florida Commissioner on the Southeast Compact Commission for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management. Currently, he is on the faculty of the Master of Public Health program at the University of West Florida's (UWF) School of Allied Health and Life Sciences as well as holding faculty positions at UWF's Department of Health, Leisure, and Exercise Science, and the Center for Environmental Diagnostics and Bioremediation (CEDB). With the CEDB, he was the co-principal investigator on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency funded projects dealing with local environmental health issues.

In addition, he led an 8 y research project on human health effects of toxins such as dioxin from local Superfund sites. Dr. Lanza is also a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences at the Florida State University College of Medicine. Dr. Lanza serves on the Residency Advisory Committee for the joint U.S. Army and Navy Aerospace Medicine Residency Program at Naval Air Station Pensacola. Dr. Lanza has numerous publications in the fields of health physics, environmental health, and public health preparedness. Most recently, he was a member of the NCRP scientific committee that produced Report No.165,"Responding to a Radiological or Nuclear Terrorism Incident: A Guide for Decision Makers."

john j. lanza
Shingleton-K

Kathleen L. Shingleton

Shingleton-K

is retired from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where she was employed for more than 38 y in a variety of positions in the Radiation Safety Program. Throughout her career she was involved with the Health Physics Society (HPS), serving as Treasurer, a Director, and Venues Committee Chair; the American Academy of Health Physics (AAHP), serving as the President and Secretary; the American Board of Health Physics, serving on both the Part I and Part II exam panels; and the Northern California Chapter of the HPS where she held numerous positions. In 2007 she was selected as a Fellow of HPS. In 2017 she became a member of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements and currently serves on the Finance Committee and Program Area Committee 2. She has a BS degree from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, a Master’s Degree in Health Physics from San Jose State University, and is comprehensively Certified by the ABHP.

Kathleen L. Shingleton
R. CRAIG YODER

R. CRAIG YODER

Yoder C

directed Landauer's technical activities relating to radiation dosimetry, particularly for applications in radiation protection from 1983 through his retirement in 2015. Additionally, he oversaw subsidiary and partner businesses located in Australia, Brazil, China, France, Mexico, Japan, Sweden and Turkey.

An internationally known expert in radiation monitoring, Dr. Yoder led Landauer's transition from film and thermoluminescent dosimetry technology to optically stimulated luminescence, an assignment that required strategic planning and direction in areas spanning scientific research, product development, manufacturing, laboratory operations and marketing. From 1993 to 2001, he was Vice President of Operations and managed Landauer's manufacturing and analytical laboratory activities in addition to overseeing research and development programs.

Dr. Yoder is a member of NCRP and former President of the Council on Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards. He has served on several national and international committees to develop dosimetry standards. He was a member of a National Research Council committee that examined the accuracy of film badge measurements made during atmospheric nuclear weapons testing.

Dr. Yoder earned his MS and PhD degrees in Bionucleonics at Purdue University and received a BS in Pre-Medicine from Davidson College. He also completed the Executive Program at Stanford University. He is Certified in Comprehensive Health Physics by the American Board of Health Physics.

r. craig yoder

Nominating Committee

The Nominating Committee is responsible for conferring with the Board of Directors to determine the number of vacancies to be filled in each election; receiving guidance from the Board as to the scientific areas of need; reviewing the individuals suggested as nominees for Council membership, including review of the comments on prospective nominees proffered by the Council members; determining the candidates to be recommended for nomination for election as voting members; presenting its slate of nominees to the Council membership at the annual meeting; presenting its slate of nominees for the offices of President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Assistant Secretary to the Council membership at the annual meeting; presenting nominations for the Board of Directors; reviewing the backgrounds of those eligible for Distinguished Emeritus membership and making appropriate recommendations in this regard to the Council membership at the annual meeting; and making other recommendations to the Council membership at the annual business meeting as it may determine are pertinent.

The Committee reviews a substantial amount of information in advance of each election, conducts its evaluations, and prepares a formal report for presentation to the Council membership at the annual meeting. Current members are:

ADELA SALAME-ALFIE

is a Senior Service Fellow in the Radiation Studies Section in the National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prior to this appointment, Dr. Salame-Alfie spent 22 y with the New York State Department of Health in various capacities including Director of the Division of Environmental Health Investigation, Director of Preparedness for the Center for Environmental Health, and Director of the Bureau of Environmental Radiation Protection.

Dr. Salame-Alfie is a member of NCRP, and co-chaired Scientific Committees 3-1 and 3-2 charged with developing dosimetry guidance for radiation emergency workers. She is a Lifetime member of the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors where she served as Chair and member of the Board of Directors and chaired several committees. She is a Fellow member of the Health Physics Society.

She has extensive experience in radiological emergency preparedness and has published and co-authored many publications on the subject, including the Handbook for Responding to a Radiological Dispersal Device – First Responder Guide.

Dr. Salame-Alfie obtained her MS and PhD in Nuclear Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York.

Adela Salame-Alfie , Chair
Bernstein

Jonine L. Bernstein

Bernstein

is an Attending Epidemiologist at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York City. Her core research focus is on breast cancer and gliomas and on understanding cancer risk and progression in order to identify those at highest risk because of gene carrier status, environmental exposures, or a combination of both. Dr. Bernstein is the Principle Investigator of the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded international 24-center Women's Environmental Cancer Radiation and Epidemiologic (WECARE) Study which was specifically designed to examine the interaction of radiation exposure and genetic predisposition in breast cancer, especially radiation-associated contralateral breast cancer (CBC) among 3,700 women with CBC and unilateral breast cancer. The WECARE Study has served as the source population for studies of candidate genes such as BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, and ATM, candidate gene pathways of DNA damage response involved in radiation-induced double-strand break repair—ATM, CHEK2, P53 binding protein (53BPI), and MDC1, Mre11, Rad50, and Nbs1 (e.g., MRN nuclease complex), a genome-wide association study, and most recently mammographic density. The global hypothesis across these studies is that women who carry certain types of mutations will be more susceptible to breast cancer than noncarriers, and possibly to radiation-associated breast cancer.

Dr. Bernstein currently serves as a member of the Board of Directors of the American College of Epidemiology, the External Advisory group for the NCI-sponsored Breast Cancer Family Registry, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, and most recently the NCI Board of Scientific Counselors-Clinical Sciences and Epidemiology. For the past two years, she has served on the Organizing Committee of the American Statistical Association Conference on Radiation and Health (2012 and 2014 meetings), and was Co-Chair of the Third North American Congress of Epidemiology, held in June 2011 for which she was honored by the 2012 ACE Award for Leadership and Service in Epidemiology. Dr. Bernstein holds a PhD in Epidemiology from Yale University, an MS in Applied Biometry from the University of Southern California, and an AB from Brown University. Before joining the faculty at MSKCC, she was Deputy Director of the Division of Epidemiology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

Jonine L. Bernstein
Boyd M

Michael A. Boyd

Boyd M

is the Director of the Center for Science and Technology in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Radiation and Indoor Air/Radiation Protection Division. The Center is responsible for the development of radiation dose and risk assessment guidance and for providing technical support for radiation protection policy issues. Mr. Boyd is also the co-chair of the Federal Guidance Subcommittee of the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards. He is a member of the NCRP’s PAC 5 and was recently elected to the NCRP Board of Directors. He is a member of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Committee 4 and chairs ICRP Task Group 98 on Application of the Commission’s Recommendations to exposures resulting from contaminated sites from past industrial, military and nuclear activities. Since 2015, he has chaired the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency's Committee on Radiological Protection and Public Health. Mr. Boyd is an active member of the Health Physics Society and is a delegate to the International Radiation Protection Association where he is currently a member of its International Congress Program Committee for IRPA 15, which will be held in Seoul, Korea in May 2020. He has a BS in Biology and MS in Public Health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Michael A. Boyd
SeibertJA

J. Anthony Seibert

SeibertJA

is Professor of Radiology at the University of California (UC) Davis School of Medicine in Sacramento, California. He received a PhD in Radiological Sciences from UC Irvine in 1982, specializing in quantitative digital fluoroscopic imaging. Directly thereafter, he took a faculty position at UC Davis Medical Center, pursuing digital imaging research, physics education efforts for graduate students and radiology residents, as well as quality control for medical imaging equipment in Diagnostic Radiology. He has continuing academic interests in digital mammography, computed tomography, interventional radiology, imaging informatics, and radiation dose tracking, assessment, and reporting. Former president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) in 2011 and current Governor of the American Board of Radiology, Dr. Seibert has served and continues to interact with many professional committees in regards to medical imaging issues and presenting technical / educational events for the AAPM, International Atomic Energy Agency, and other professional societies. For NCRP, he is a member of Program Area Committee 4. As a co-author of The Essential Physics of Medical Imaging textbook for diagnostic physics education, Dr. Seibert continues with the development of cutting edge imaging technologies and medical physics education to improve the state of imaging science for the betterment of patient care.

J. Anthony Seibert
Zeitlin C

Cary J. Zeitlin

Zeitlin C

is a Senior Research Scientist with Leidos Innovations Corporation, working for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center Space Radiation Analysis Group to assess exposures and risks to astronauts in current and future mission scenarios. He began his career in particle physics in the early 1980s, scanning nuclear emulsion that had been exposed to a beam of high-energy iron ions at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) Bevalac. As this is one of the most tedious jobs imaginable, greener pastures soon beckoned, leading him to join the TPC/Two-Gamma Collaboration at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. After receiving his PhD in experimental high-energy physics and spending another 3 y at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center as a postdoc studying the decays of the Z boson, Dr. Zeitlin returned to LBL and to nuclear physics in 1991 to work on a long-term project measuring the fragmentation cross sections most pertinent to NASA’s space radiation transport codes. This experience led to his taking over as Principal Investigator of the Martian Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE) aboard the Mars Odyssey orbiter following the untimely passing of Dr. Gautam Badhwar. This led subsequently to his role as Co-Investigator with the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) project starting in 2008, as the instrument was being prepared for integration into the Curiosity Rover. After the successful transit and spectacular landing of Curiosity on Mars in 2012, RAD has been operating almost without interruption on the surface, sending back the first detailed radiation environment measurements from another planet. A second RAD was built for the International Space Station and began flight operations in early 2016. Dr. Zeitlin has received two Outstanding Performance awards from LBL and has received three awards from NASA for his work on the MARIE, RAD, and CRaTER projects. He was elected to the NCRP in 2014.

Cary J. Zeitlin

*President, Senior Vice President, and Executive Director are ex-officio members

Program Committee for the 2022 Annual Meeting

The Program Committee for the annual meeting is appointed by the Board. Prior to that, the Board has directed attention to the identification of a scientific topic to serve as a theme for the annual meeting, sometimes utilizing expositions of specimen programs on alternative topics prepared under the Board’s direction. The Program Committee is responsible for developing the program on the topic selected by the Board and identifying potential speakers. Following approval of the proposed program by the Board, the Committee completes the arrangements for the meeting and, subsequently, for the publication of the proceedings. Members of the Program Committee frequently serve as chair of the various sessions of the meeting.

The topic for the 2022 Annual Meeting will be “NCRP: State of the Science in Radiation Protection”

Evagelia C. Laiakis

received her PhD degree in Human Genetics from the University of Maryland at Baltimore, studying radiation induced genomic instability and the contribution of pro-inflammatory processes under the guidance of Dr. William F. Morgan. She subsequently completed her postdoctoral fellowship with Dr. Albert J. Fornace, Jr. at Georgetown University, in the field of radiation biodosimetry through metabolomics. She is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Oncology at the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center and the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology. She is an elected Council Member to NCRP and has been serving as a member of Program Area Committee 1 of NCRP since 2016. She is also a current Councilor-at-Large of the Radiation Research Society (RRS) and a dedicated mentor to students and postdocs in various societies and the Sallie Rosen Kaplan fellowship program. Dr. Laiakis’ lab aims to expand the field of radiation metabolomics and lipidomics through mass spectrometry with untargeted and targeted approaches. Her research focus includes understanding metabolic responses to scenarios involving a wide range of doses (low dose to acute radiation syndrome associated doses), dose rates, normal tissue responses, and radiation quality effects (photons; neutrons; high atomic number, high energy particles), utilizing biofluids and tissues from rodents to humans. Her work has also expanded to space radiation effects, in combination with stressors such as microgravity, with emphasis on immune and muscle related changes. Finally, she is an Associate Editor for the International Journal of Radiation Biology and the 2019 recipient of the Jack Fowler award from RRS.

Evagelia C. Laiakis , Co-Chair

Jessica S. Wieder

Jessica Wieder is an expert in radiation risk communication. As a member of NCRP’s Program Area on Radiation Education, Risk Communication and Outreach, Ms. Wieder helped write NCRP Report No. 179, Guidance for Emergency Response Dosimetry, and plan the outreach for high profile publications such as NCRP Report No. 180 on Management of Exposure to Ionizing Radiation: Radiation Protection Guidance for the United States (2018), and Commentary No. 27 on the Implications of Recent Epidemiologic Studies for the Linear-Nonthreshold Model and Radiation Protection. Also working through NCRP, Ms. Wieder and Brooke Buddemeier became TED educators on how to survive nuclear fallout.

Ms. Wieder is the Director of the Center for Radiation Information and Outreach at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). She served at EPA’s senior radiation public information officer during the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, facilitated international panels on emergency response public communication, and was part of the contingency planning team for the 2011 launch of the Mars Science Laboratory. In 2013, she was awarded EPA's Exemplary Customer Service Award for her leadership in enabling all levels of government to provide quick, effective communications to the American people in response to large-scale radiological emergencies.

In 2010, Ms. Wieder was detailed to Federal Emergency Management Agency's Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives Branch, where she created the intergovernmental Nuclear/Radiological Communications Working Group. With her guidance, this group developed the nuclear detonation messaging document Improvised Nuclear Device Response and Recovery: Communicating in the Immediate Aftermath.

Jessica S. Wieder , Co-Chair
DeCairS

Sara D. DeCair

DeCairS

has been with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air since 2003. She has focused on radiological emergency preparedness and spent over a decade negotiating the finalization of the 2017 EPA Protective Action Guides (PAG) Manual. Assisting with adoption of the updated PAG Manual has continued to be a collaborative effort with the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), Advisory Team for Environment, Food and Health and the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Currently, Ms. DeCair is Associate Center Director for the EPA's radiological protection program's Center for Science and Technology, a small group of radiation experts who provide federal guidance reports and lead an in-house health physics continuing education program for the Agency.

She previously worked for 7 y with the State of Michigan's Department of Environmental Quality. Three of those years were spent in nuclear power plant emergency response and planning where she went from participating in to becoming a trainer for everything from state field team leader, dose assessor, decontamination team leader, various Emergency Operations Center positions, and eventually scenario development and exercise design.

The 3 y prior, Ms. DeCair worked as a State of Michigan inspector of radioactive materials registrants and radiation incident responder. Incident responses ranged from scrap yard portal monitor alarms to oil and gas pipe yard naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) discoveries to medical waste from Ohio or Canada. Source identification, isolation, storage, and even disposal were among the responsibilities of the incident responder. She also led the instrument calibration efforts for materials program instruments, completed several oil and gas NORM site cleanups, and facilitated the proper disposal of numerous orphan radioactive sources in the state.

Ms. DeCair is a longtime national Health Physics Society (HPS) member and has served 4 y on the Board of the Baltimore-Washington Chapter of HPS.

Sara D. DeCair
Hamada

Nobuyuki Hamada

Hamada

was born in Japan in 1976. He received a BSc in radiological sciences from Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, and became a registered radiological technologist in 1999. He earned his MSc and PhD in pharmaceutical sciences from Nagasaki University in 2001 and 2004, respectively. He was a visiting PhD student at the U.K. Gray Cancer Institute for six months in 2003. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences and in Tohoku University Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, and a Center of Excellence Associate Professor in Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine. He is currently Senior Research Scientist at Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Radiation Safety Research Center, and Visiting Professor at Hiroshima University Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine.

For NCRP, he is a PAC 1 member and was a Consultant to SC 1-23 in 2014 to 2017 that produced NCRP Commentary No. 26. For the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), he is a member of Task Groups 102 and 111 and a Mentor, was Assistant Scientific Secretary and Associate Editor for Publications 126 through 132. He is also a member of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency/Committee on Radiological Protection and Public Health/High Level Group on Low Dose Research/Radiation and Chemical Adverse Outcome Pathways (OECD/NEA/CRPPH/HLG–LDR/RAD-CHEM AOP) Topical Group, Consultation Committee for AOP Development for Space Flight Health Outcomes, Scientific Committee for the 2021 Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) workshop on AOP for radiation effects, Associate Editor for Radiation Research and International Journal of Radiation Biology, and Editorial Board Member for nine journals such as Mutation Research/Reviews in Mutation Research and PLOS ONE. He was a member of OECD/NEA/CRPPH/Expert Group on Radiological Protection Science (EGRPS) that produced NEA No. 7265 report, a member of the IRPA Task Group Phase 3 “The implementation of the eye lens dose limit”, and Chair of Scientific Advisory Board for the European CONCERT LDLensRad.

He has been involved in various radiation effect studies since 1998, his current focus being placed on tissue reactions (e.g., circulatory and ocular disease). He has published >120 papers in peer-reviewed international journals and has received >20 awards.

Nobuyuki Hamada

Willie O. Harris

is the Director, Radiation Protection for Exelon Nuclear. In his current role he is responsible to develop the governance and provide oversight of the radiation protection programs for the largest operator of nuclear power plants in the United States. He has over 35 y of broad-based experience in commercial nuclear power plants, which includes over 25 y in supervisory and management positions. He holds a bachelor’s degree in radiation protection and a master degree in business administration. He is a Certified Health Physicist and a registered radiation protection Technologist and holds a senior reactor operator certification. He continues to serve several industry committees which includes the Scientific Advisory Committee for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Low Dose Research, the EPRI Technical Advisory Committee, and the World Nuclear Association Radiation Protection Working Group.

Willie O. Harris
Powell B

Brian A. Powell

Powell B

is the Jerry E. and Harriet Calvert Dempsey Associate Professor of Waste Management in the Department of Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences at Clemson University. Dr. Powell's research focuses on understanding and prediction of the physical, chemical and biological processes which govern the mobility of radionuclides in natural and engineered systems. He has a BS in Chemistry from the University of Montevallo, and an MS and PhD in Environmental Engineering and Science from Clemson University. Prior to joining the faculty at Clemson University, Dr. Powell held postdoctoral appointments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Dr. Powell has conducted sponsored research in a wide range of projects dealing with topics of sorption and environmental transport of actinides, nuclear forensics, development of radiation detection and radiation detection laboratory courses, iodine, radium, strontium geochemistry in wetland and subsurface sediments, radionuclide geochemistry of saltstone and solid waste performance assessments at the Savannah River Site, measurement of thermodynamic parameters supporting advanced fuel cycle chemistry, and related topics. The knowledge gained from this work can be used to evaluate risk posed by subsurface contamination of radionuclides, to design remediation strategies for contaminated sites, and to facilitate the use of safe disposal practices.

Along with serving on the NAMP PAC 5 committee, Dr. Powell is also a member of the Radiation Safety Committee of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Scientific Advisory Board and a member/lecturer for the U.S. Department of Energy National Analytical Management Program, Education and Training Subcommittee. Additionally, Dr. Powell is the winner of the 2014 South Carolina Governor's Young Researcher Award for Excellence in Scientific Research and the 2011 Clemson University Sigma Xi Young Investigator of the Year.

brian a. powell

Angela Shogren

is a member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Center for Radiation Information and Outreach. Ms. Shogren's career with EPA has focused on radiation risk communication and radiation data visualization. Ms. Shogren supported EPA's communication efforts during the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident. She has facilitated international panels on radiation risk communication in pediatric medical imaging, with a focus on patient advocacy and effective communication methods. Since 2010, Ms. Shogren has been a member of an expert working group led by the World Health Organization that addresses radiation risk communication in pediatric medical imaging. With her guidance, this group developed the 2016 practical reference document, Communicating Radiation Risk in Paediatric Medical Imaging: Information to Support Healthcare Discussions About Benefit and Risk.

Angela Shogren
Jeffrey J. Whicker

Jeffrey J. Whicker

worked at Los Alamos National Laboratory as a health physicist and scientist for over 30 y. He received an MS in Health Physics and a PhD in Environmental and Radiological Health Science from Colorado State University and is certified by the American Board of Health Physics. Dr. Whicker is an elected Board Member of NCRP, served as a Board Member of the Health Physics Society, consulted for the International Atomic Energy Agency since 2018 on environmental sampling and remediation decisions, and was on the Editorial Board for the journal Radiation Protection Dosimetry for 8 y. He has been the recipient of numerous achievement awards including the U.S. Department of Energy Secretary’s Honor Award (2020). He is an author or co-author of hundreds of scientific publications, invited talks, book chapters, and presentations mostly on indoor and outdoor radiological air quality and measurements that span issues ranging from worker protection, homeland security, radiological dose and risk assessment for the public and the environment, and environmental quality. His research in outdoor air quality focused on aerosol transport through wind-driven suspension of contaminated soil and the effects of ecosystem disturbance on environmental transport rates. This research has broad implications for both public and ecosystem health.

Jeffrey J. Whicker

Pat B. Zanzonico

received a BS in Physics from Cooper Union in 1977 and a PhD in Biophysics from the Cornell University Graduate School of Medical Sciences in 1982. He served on the faculty of the Department of Radiology (Nuclear Medicine) of the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center and is currently a Member and Attending Physicist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Co-Head of the Center's Small-Animal Imaging Laboratories, and Chairman of its Committee on Radiation. He also serves on the Special Contributing Faculty of the Gerstner Sloan-Kettering Graduate School and is an Adjunct Professor of Applied Physics and Mathematics at Columbia University. Dr. Zanzonico is Associate Editor of the British Journal of Radiology and the European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and a member of the Editorial Boards of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Medical Physics. He is also a member of the Medical Internal Radionuclide Dosimetry Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging and Vice-Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Advisory Committee on Medical Uses of Isotopes, and a past Consultant to the International Atomic Energy Agency. Dr. Zanzonico has over 120 peer-reviewed publications and over 75 invited presentations. He is actively involved in biomedical research on radionuclide-based methods for detecting and localizing tumor hypoxia, immune effector-cell trafficking, patient-specific dosimetry for radionuclide therapies, and small-animal and molecular imaging.

Pat B. Zanzonico

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Last modified: May 25, 2015