NCRP

Administrative Committees

Budget and Finance Committee

The Budget and Finance Committee is responsible for the development of the annual budget which, for the succeeding year, is submitted to the Board of Directors for action in December of the current year. Current members are:

WILLIAM E. KENNEDY, JR.

WILLIAM E. KENNEDY, JR.

Kennedy-W

has extensive experience as a project manager, task leader, and individual contributor covering a broad range of health physics and nuclear engineering topics. He received his BS and MS degrees in Nuclear Engineering from Kansas State University. Mr. Kennedy has been involved in the development of environmental pathway and radiation dosimetry models used to assess potential health and environmental impacts that resulted from releases of radionuclides to the environment.

He specializes in the use of these models in environmental dose reconstruction, radioactive materials transport, radioactive waste disposal, and evaluation of nuclear facility operating practices. Over the past 37 y, Mr. Kennedy has led and contributed to a variety of projects for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the U.S. Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, and private industry. He has been involved with development of the technical basis for revised standards and regulations, and serves as the chair of ANSI/HPS N13.12, Surface and volume Radioactivity Standards for Clearance. He served as a consultant to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna, Austria, and was a member of the IAEA Advisory Groups to evaluate the Derivation of Exempt Quantities for Application to Terrestrial Waste Disposal and Derivation of Exempt Quantities for Recycle of Materials from Nuclear Facilities.

He was an invited lecturer for IAEA training courses on Management of Radioactive Waste from Nuclear Power Plants at Argonne National Laboratory; on Safety Assessment Modeling for Low and Intermediate Radwastes in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and in Cairo, Egypt; and on Environmental Monitoring in Kiev, Ukraine. In 1990, he received the Health Physics Society's (HPS) prestigious Elda E. Anderson Award. He served as a member of the HPS Board of Directors from 1998 through 2001 and was selected as a fellow of the society in 2002. He was a member of the U.S. delegation to the 10th Congress of the International Radiation Protection Association in Hiroshima, Japan.

william e. kennedy, jr. , Chair
JERROLD T. BUSHBERG

JERROLD T. BUSHBERG

Bushberg-J

is a Clinical Professor of Radiology and Clinical Professor of Radiation Oncology at University of California (UC) Davis School of Medicine. He holds the title of Director Emeritus Medical/Health Physics Programs and retired as Associate Chair of the Department of Radiology in 2018. He is currently Chair of the Board of Directors and Senior Vice President of NCRP. He is an expert on the biological effects, safety and interactions of ionizing and nonionizing radiation and holds multiple radiation detection technology patents. With over 40 y of experience he has served as a subject matter expert and an advisor to government agencies and institutions throughout the nation and around the world including the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, the World Health Organization, and the International Atomic Energy Agency in the areas of ionizing and nonionizing radiation protection, risk communication, medical physics, and radiological emergency medical management. In 2016, Dr. Bushberg was appointed Vice Chair of the Committee on Man and Radiation which is a Technical Committee of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Former Commander in the U.S. Naval Reserve, among other assignments CDR Bushberg served as Executive Officer of the Chemical/Biological/Nuclear Technical Unit 120 Pacific, a highly skilled multidisciplinary military emergency response and advisory team based out of the Alameda Naval Air Station in California. Dr. Bushberg is an elected fellow of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the Health Physics Society. He is certified by several national professional boards with specific subspecialty certification in radiation protection and medical physics and currently serves as a Director and Vice Chair of the American Board of Medical Physics. In 2014, Dr. Bushberg was awarded the NCRP Warren K. Sinclair Medal for Excellence in Radiation Science and received the Professor John C. Christiansen Distinguished Alumnus award from Purdue University School of Health Sciences in 2016. Prior to coming to the UC Davis Health System as technical director of Nuclear Medicine, Dr. Bushberg was on the faculty of Yale University School of Medicine Department of Radiology where his research was focused on radiopharmaceutical development. Dr. Bushberg has had responsibility for medical postgraduate education in medical physics, radiation (ionizing and nonionizing) biology and protection for more than 30 y. The third edition of the textbook The Essential Physics of Medical Imaging, authored by Bushberg, Seibert, Leidholdt, and Boone, is used extensively by radiology residency programs throughout the United States.

jerrold t. bushberg

JOHN J. LANZA

is the Director of the Florida Department of Health in Escambia County (FDOH-EC). Dr. Lanza is a Board-certified pediatrician with a PhD in Medical Radiation Physics from the University of Florida. Since 2001, he has been the Public Health and Medical co-chair for the Florida Department of Law Enforcement's Domestic Security Task Force Northwest Florida. Before his FDOH-EC position, Dr. Lanza worked as a pediatric emergency department physician in Lakeland, Florida and was in private pediatric practice in Longwood, Florida. Dr. Lanza is a fellow of the America Academy of Pediatrics, a past president of the Escambia County Medical Society (2004), a member of the American Medical Association, and the Florida Medical Association (FMA), where he was the chair of the FMA Council on Public Health for 8 y. He is a founding board member of the Florida Public Health Institute. In addition, he is a member of the Florida Chapter of the Health Physics Society and the national Health Physics Society where he serves as past president of their Homeland Security Section and a member of the medical response subcommittee. Dr. Lanza was recently elected to the Health Physics Society Board of Directors. In 2005, he was appointed as a Florida Commissioner on the Southeast Compact Commission for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management. Currently, he is on the faculty of the Master of Public Health program at the University of West Florida's (UWF) School of Allied Health and Life Sciences as well as holding faculty positions at UWF's Department of Health, Leisure, and Exercise Science, and the Center for Environmental Diagnostics and Bioremediation (CEDB). With the CEDB, he was the co-principal investigator on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency funded projects dealing with local environmental health issues.

In addition, he led an 8 y research project on human health effects of toxins such as dioxin from local Superfund sites. Dr. Lanza is also a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences at the Florida State University College of Medicine. Dr. Lanza serves on the Residency Advisory Committee for the joint U.S. Army and Navy Aerospace Medicine Residency Program at Naval Air Station Pensacola. Dr. Lanza has numerous publications in the fields of health physics, environmental health, and public health preparedness. Most recently, he was a member of the NCRP scientific committee that produced Report No.165,"Responding to a Radiological or Nuclear Terrorism Incident: A Guide for Decision Makers."

john j. lanza
Shingleton-K

Kathleen L. Shingleton

Shingleton-K

has been employed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for more than 35 y and is currently the Radiation Safety Program Technical Leader in the Environment, Safety, and Health Directorate. She is responsible for developing a comprehensive, compliant and effective radiation safety program for LLNL, which serves as a national resource of scientific, technical and engineering capability with a special focus on national security. Over the years, LLNL’s mission has been broadened to encompass strategic defense, energy, the environment, biomedicine, technology transfer, education, counter-terrorism, and emergency response. Support of these operations requires the use of a wide range of radiation-generating devices (e.g., x-ray machines, accelerators, electron-beam welders) and radioactive material. The types of radioactive materials range from tritium to transuranics and the quantities range from nanocuries to kilocuries. In addition to her work at LLNL, Ms. Shingleton has been involved with both the Health Physics Society (HPS) and the American Academy of Health Physics (AAHP) over many years, including serving recently as the AAHP President and currently as the HPS Treasurer. Other positions included HPS Director (2005 to 2008); AAHP Secretary (2002 to 2004); American Board of Health Physics (ABHP) Part II (1997 to 2001) and Part I (1992 to 1996) exam panels; HPS Venues Committee chair (1995 to 1999); and numerous positions in the Northern California Chapter of the HPS. In 2007, she was selected as a Fellow of the Health Physics Society.

Kathleen L. Shingleton
R. CRAIG YODER

R. CRAIG YODER

Yoder C

directed Landauer's technical activities relating to radiation dosimetry, particularly for applications in radiation protection from 1983 through his retirement in 2015. Additionally, he oversaw subsidiary and partner businesses located in Australia, Brazil, China, France, Mexico, Japan, Sweden and Turkey.

An internationally known expert in radiation monitoring, Dr. Yoder led Landauer's transition from film and thermoluminescent dosimetry technology to optically stimulated luminescence, an assignment that required strategic planning and direction in areas spanning scientific research, product development, manufacturing, laboratory operations and marketing. From 1993 to 2001, he was Vice President of Operations and managed Landauer's manufacturing and analytical laboratory activities in addition to overseeing research and development programs.

Dr. Yoder is a member of NCRP and former President of the Council on Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards. He has served on several national and international committees to develop dosimetry standards. He was a member of a National Research Council committee that examined the accuracy of film badge measurements made during atmospheric nuclear weapons testing.

Dr. Yoder earned his MS and PhD degrees in Bionucleonics at Purdue University and received a BS in Pre-Medicine from Davidson College. He also completed the Executive Program at Stanford University. He is Certified in Comprehensive Health Physics by the American Board of Health Physics.

r. craig yoder

Nominating Committee

The Nominating Committee is responsible for conferring with the Board of Directors to determine the number of vacancies to be filled in each election; receiving guidance from the Board as to the scientific areas of need; reviewing the individuals suggested as nominees for Council membership, including review of the comments on prospective nominees proffered by the Council members; determining the candidates to be recommended for nomination for election as voting members; presenting its slate of nominees to the Council membership at the annual meeting; presenting its slate of nominees for the offices of President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, and Assistant Secretary to the Council membership at the annual meeting; presenting nominations for the Board of Directors; reviewing the backgrounds of those eligible for Distinguished Emeritus membership and making appropriate recommendations in this regard to the Council membership at the annual meeting; and making other recommendations to the Council membership at the annual business meeting as it may determine are pertinent.

The Committee reviews a substantial amount of information in advance of each election, conducts its evaluations, and prepares a formal report for presentation to the Council membership at the annual meeting. Current members are:

ADELA SALAME-ALFIE

is a Senior Service Fellow in the Radiation Studies Branch in the National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prior to this appointment, Dr. Salame-Alfie spent 22 y with the New York State Department of Health in various capacities including Director of the Division of Environmental Health Investigation, Director of Preparedness for the Center for Environmental Health, and Director of the Bureau of Environmental Radiation Protection.

Dr. Salame-Alfie is a member of NCRP and co-chairs the SC 3-1 charged with developing dosimetry guidance for radiation emergency workers. She is a Lifetime member of the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors where she served as Chair and member of the Board of Directors, and chaired several committees. She is a Fellow member of the Health Physics Society.

Dr. Salame-Alfie has extensive experience in radiological emergency preparedness and has published and co-authored many publications on the subject, including the Handbook for Responding to a Radiological Dispersal Device – First Responder Guide.

Dr. Salame-Alfie obtained her Master’s and Ph.D. in Nuclear Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York.

Adela Salame-Alfie , Chair
Boyd M

MICHAEL BOYD

Boyd M

is the Director of the Center for Science and Technology in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Radiation and Indoor Air/Radiation Protection Division. The Center is responsible for the development of radiation dose and risk assessment guidance and for providing technical support for radiation protection policy issues. Mr. Boyd is also the co-chair of the Federal Guidance Subcommittee of the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards. He is a member of the NCRP’s PAC 5 and was recently elected to the NCRP Board of Directors. He is a member of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Committee 4 and chairs ICRP Task Group 98 on Application of the Commission’s Recommendations to exposures resulting from contaminated sites from past industrial, military and nuclear activities. Since 2015, he has chaired the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency's Committee on Radiological Protection and Public Health. Mr. Boyd is an active member of the Health Physics Society and is a delegate to the International Radiation Protection Association where he is currently a member of its International Congress Program Committee for IRPA 15, which will be held in Seoul, Korea in May 2020. He has a BS in Biology and MS in Public Health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

michael boyd
Pryor-K

KATHRYN H. PRYOR

Pryor-K

has been a member of Program Area Committee (PAC) 2 since 2007 and a member of NCRP since 2010. She has served on Scientific Committees 2-4, 2-5, 2-7, 1-19, and 6-9. Ms. Pryor is currently on the NCRP Board of Directors and is Scientific Vice President of PAC 2. She received her BS in Biology in 1979 and MS in Radiological Sciences in 1981, both from the University of Washington.

Ms. Pryor was the Chief Health Physicist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, providing management and technical support to the PNNL Radiation Protection Division since 1992. She also served as the Chief Radiological Engineer for the design of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Project. Ms. Pryor previously held radiation protection technical support positions at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station and the Trojan Nuclear Plant, and was the Radiation Safety Officer at the University of Southern California Health Sciences Campus.

Ms. Pryor is a Fellow member of the Health Physics Society (HPS) and served as President-Elect, President, and Past President from 2010 to 2013. She is certified in comprehensive practice by the American Board of Health Physics (ABHP), and served on the ABHP both as a member and Chair from 1998 to 2002. She is currently the President of the American Academy of Health Physics. Ms. Pryor was awarded the William McAdams Outstanding Service Award by ABHP in 2007 and the John P. Corley Meritorious Service Award by the Columbia Chapter of HPS in 2003.

kathryn h. pryor
WeilM

MICHAEL M. WEIL

WeilM

is a professor in the Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences at Colorado State University (CSU). His research, which takes advantage of murine models of radiation carcinogenesis and leukemogenesis, is focused on understanding how radiation exposure can lead to cancer and why some individuals may be more susceptible than others. At CSU, Dr. Weil teaches a graduate level course in cancer genetics and lectures in courses on cancer biology, environmental carcinogenesis, principles of radiation biology, and the pathobiology of laboratory animals.

Dr. Weil earned his PhD in Microbiology from the University of Texas at Austin and was trained in cancer genetics and radiation biology in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Biochemistry and the Department of Experimental Radiotherapy at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Weil is a Radiation Research Society council member and has served on National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Defense, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration grant review panels.

michael m. weil
Zeitlin C

CARY ZEITLIN

Zeitlin C

is a Senior Research Scientist with Leidos Innovations Corporation, working for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center Space Radiation Analysis Group to assess exposures and risks to astronauts in current and future mission scenarios. He began his career in particle physics in the early 1980s, scanning nuclear emulsion that had been exposed to a beam of high-energy iron ions at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) Bevalac. As this is one of the most tedious jobs imaginable, greener pastures soon beckoned, leading him to join the TPC/Two-Gamma Collaboration at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. After receiving his PhD in experimental high-energy physics and spending another 3 y at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center as a postdoc studying the decays of the Z boson, Dr. Zeitlin returned to LBL and to nuclear physics in 1991 to work on a long-term project measuring the fragmentation cross sections most pertinent to NASA’s space radiation transport codes. This experience led to his taking over as Principal Investigator of the Martian Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE) aboard the Mars Odyssey orbiter following the untimely passing of Dr. Gautam Badhwar. This led subsequently to his role as Co-Investigator with the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) project starting in 2008, as the instrument was being prepared for integration into the Curiosity Rover. After the successful transit and spectacular landing of Curiosity on Mars in 2012, RAD has been operating almost without interruption on the surface, sending back the first detailed radiation environment measurements from another planet. A second RAD was built for the International Space Station and began flight operations in early 2016. Dr. Zeitlin has received two Outstanding Performance awards from LBL and has received three awards from NASA for his work on the MARIE, RAD, and CRaTER projects. He was elected to the NCRP in 2014.

cary zeitlin

*President, Senior Vice President, and Executive Director are ex-officio members

Program Committee for the 2019 Annual Meeting

The Program Committee for the annual meeting is appointed by the Board. Prior to that, the Board has directed attention to the identification of a scientific topic to serve as a theme for the annual meeting, sometimes utilizing expositions of specimen programs on alternative topics prepared under the Board’s direction. The Program Committee is responsible for developing the program on the topic selected by the Board and identifying potential speakers. Following approval of the proposed program by the Board, the Committee completes the arrangements for the meeting and, subsequently, for the publication of the proceedings. Members of the Program Committee frequently serve as chair of the various sessions of the meeting.

The topic for the 2020 Annual Meeting will be “Radiation & Flight: A Down-to-Earth Look at the Risks”

Williams J

JACQUELINE P. WILLIAMS

Williams J

completed her undergraduate degrees at the University of Nottingham, followed by her post-doctoral training in radiation biology at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, University of London, U.K. Shortly after completing her studies, she joined the faculty at the University of Rochester, New York, in the department of Radiation Oncology, and recently in the department of Environmental Medicine. Since that time, Dr. Williams has accrued more than 25 y of experience in radiation biology and related fields and has been involved in a wide range of research areas, including clinically-related oncologic studies and clinical trials, tumor blood flow studies, long-term carcinogenic studies, and pharmacological and toxicological projects.

Her current research interests involve identifying mechanisms that underlie the initiation and progression of radiation-induced late normal tissue effects as a consequence of high-dose clinical treatment/accidental exposures or the lower doses associated with either space travel or mass exposures with the goal of developing protection or mitigation strategies. Dr. Williams has served as the President of the Radiation Research Society, the Research Chair on the Board of the American Society for Radiation Oncology, and has been elected to, and is currently serving as, Council Member to the International Association for Radiation Research.

jacqueline p. williams , Co-Chair
Zeitlin C

CARY ZEITLIN

Zeitlin C

is a Senior Research Scientist with Leidos Innovations Corporation, working for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center Space Radiation Analysis Group to assess exposures and risks to astronauts in current and future mission scenarios. He began his career in particle physics in the early 1980s, scanning nuclear emulsion that had been exposed to a beam of high-energy iron ions at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) Bevalac. As this is one of the most tedious jobs imaginable, greener pastures soon beckoned, leading him to join the TPC/Two-Gamma Collaboration at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. After receiving his PhD in experimental high-energy physics and spending another 3 y at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center as a postdoc studying the decays of the Z boson, Dr. Zeitlin returned to LBL and to nuclear physics in 1991 to work on a long-term project measuring the fragmentation cross sections most pertinent to NASA’s space radiation transport codes. This experience led to his taking over as Principal Investigator of the Martian Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE) aboard the Mars Odyssey orbiter following the untimely passing of Dr. Gautam Badhwar. This led subsequently to his role as Co-Investigator with the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) project starting in 2008, as the instrument was being prepared for integration into the Curiosity Rover. After the successful transit and spectacular landing of Curiosity on Mars in 2012, RAD has been operating almost without interruption on the surface, sending back the first detailed radiation environment measurements from another planet. A second RAD was built for the International Space Station and began flight operations in early 2016. Dr. Zeitlin has received two Outstanding Performance awards from LBL and has received three awards from NASA for his work on the MARIE, RAD, and CRaTER projects. He was elected to the NCRP in 2014.

cary zeitlin , Co-Chair
No ImageJeri Anderson

Janice L. Huff

is employed by MEI Technologies, Inc. Houston, Texas. She serves as the Deputy Element Scientist for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Human Research Program, Space Radiation Element at the Johnson Space Center. In this capacity, Dr. Huff is responsible for scientific management and strategic planning, ensuring that the Element’s research portfolio is organized to understand and mitigate radiation health risks, and to develop countermeasures and technologies supporting space exploration missions. Previously, she held the positions of research assistant professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and was a research scientist at Bioforce Nanosciences, Inc., a bio-nanotechnology company specializing in development of ultraminiaturized biodiagnostic tools and technologies. She joined NASA in 2004 as the lead scientist for the Advanced Technology Development Laboratory in the Cell Science Program.

Dr. Huff received a BS in Microbiology and a BA in Psychology from the University of Rochester. She earned a PhD in Microbiology from the University of Virginia studying molecular biology, oncogenes, and signal transduction in the laboratory of J. Thomas Parsons. She was elected to the NCRP in 2017, and currently serves on Scientific Committee 1-24 (Phase II), and is a member of the organizing committee for the 2019 NCRP Annual Meeting.

Janice L. Huff

Evagelia C. Laiakis

is an Assistant Professor at Georgetown University in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular and Cellular Biology. Her previous studies included nontargeted effects and perpetuation of the radiation induced genomic instability phenotype. Her ongoing work focuses on biodosimetry through systems biology approaches with emphasis on metabolomics in biofluids (urine, blood, saliva) and tissues, and both animal models and human populations. Additionally, she is investigating radiation related metabolic dysregulation related to different radiation qualities with regards to medical exposures and space radiation.

Dr. Laiakis completed her undergraduate studies at University of Maryland at College Park in Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics. She received her PhD from University of Maryland at Baltimore in Human Genetics and completed her postdoctoral fellowship at Georgetown University. She is also an alumna of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Summer School at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Additionally, she serves as a member of the organizing committee for the “Nuclear Security Summit and Workshop,” a now annual event taking place at Georgetown University to bring together policy leaders, emergency preparedness and response planners, economists, scientists, and engineers to discuss issues associated with nuclear disasters.

Evagelia C. Laiakis
OBanion M

M. Kerry O’Banion

is a Professor of Neuroscience and Neurology and member of the Del Monte Neuroscience Institute at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry in Rochester, New York. His research focuses on neuroinflammation and glial cell biology, emphasizing cellular interactions in in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, as well as in central nervous system radiation exposure, and how these contribute to pathology and cognitive deficits in preclinical models. His laboratory has participated in ground-based radiation research studies for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration since 2004, and is a member of NCRP Scientific Committee 1-24P2 on Radiation Exposures in Space and the Potential for Central Nervous System Effects (Phase II).

Dr. O’Banion received his MD and PhD in Microbiology from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana and carried out postdoctoral work as a Wilmot Cancer Fellow at the University of Rochester that contributed to the discovery of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) as a critical mediator of inflammation. In addition to his research, Dr. O’Banion has directed Rochester’s Medical Scientist Training (MD-PhD) Program since 2000.

M. Kerry O’Banion
No ImageZarana Patel

Mark Shavers

is a Senior Scientist on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) KBRwyle Human Health and Performance Contract and supports the NASA Radiation Health Officer in the Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. He leads the SRAG development and implementation team for cancer risk analysis and is a member of a medical operations radiation health working group and a radiation discipline systems maturation team for the partner agencies of the International Space Station. Over the past two decades, his responsibilities in the Space Medicine Group, Habitability and Human Factors, and Biomedical Research Groups at JSC include the assessment and protection of astronauts from ionizing and nonionizing radiations, various aspects of protection for human spaceflight, including evaluating radiation shielding effectiveness, and other aspects of the cancer risk analysis of the exposures of astronauts to various sources of ionizing and nonionizing radiations. Earlier work includes transport modeling of accelerated proton (Loma Linda University Medical Center) and heavy ion (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) beam interacting in thick absorbers, quantitative modeling of the biological effectiveness of cosmic ions at space-like energies. His education includes degrees in environmental engineering sciences, radiological sciences, and nuclear engineering.

Mark Shavers
StoryM

MICHAEL D. STORY

StoryM

is a professor at the University of Texas (UT) Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. Dr. Story earned his PhD from Colorado State University. He holds the David M. Pistenmaa, M.D., Ph.D. Distinguished Chair in Radiation Oncology, serves as Vice-Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology, Chief of the Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, and Director of the Genomics Shared Resource of the Simmons Cancer Center. Dr. Story also serves on the editorial board of the International Journal of Particle Therapy and has served on a number of review panels for the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and other entities. He also serves as a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for Galera Therapeutics.

Dr. Story has taught for several sessions of the NASA Space Radiation Summer School, directs the radiobiology course for the radiation oncology resident program, and lectures in 'omics technologies for the Graduate School of Biological Sciences at UT Southwestern. Dr. Story's research is focused on four areas associated with radiation exposure. The first area is the identification of genomic or epigenomic factors that predict or are prognostic for the radioresponse in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The second area is the combinatorial application of radiation with other biologic- or chemo-agents, as well as low frequency electromagnetic fields to alter the response of both tumors (radiosensitization) or normal tissues (radioprotection).

The third area is characterizing the radioresponse of lung and liver tissues to high linear-energy transfer radiation exposures, including the development of biomarkers of carcinogenic risk in these tissues. Lastly, Dr. Story is heading the development of research programs in charged particle radiotherapy at UT Southwestern. Dr. Story's research is funded by the NCI, NASA, the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, and industry.

michael d. story
WeilM

MICHAEL M. WEIL

WeilM

is a professor in the Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences at Colorado State University (CSU). His research, which takes advantage of murine models of radiation carcinogenesis and leukemogenesis, is focused on understanding how radiation exposure can lead to cancer and why some individuals may be more susceptible than others. At CSU, Dr. Weil teaches a graduate level course in cancer genetics and lectures in courses on cancer biology, environmental carcinogenesis, principles of radiation biology, and the pathobiology of laboratory animals.

Dr. Weil earned his PhD in Microbiology from the University of Texas at Austin and was trained in cancer genetics and radiation biology in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Biochemistry and the Department of Experimental Radiotherapy at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Weil is a Radiation Research Society council member and has served on National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Defense, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration grant review panels.

michael m. weil

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Last modified: May 25, 2015