NCRP

Officers & Board of Directors

Officers

President

KATHRYN D. HELD

Held K

became President of the NCRP in January 2019. She held the position of Executive Director and Chief Science Officer from 2016 to 2018. She was first elected to the Council in 2006 and served on the NCRP Board of Directors from 2008 to 2014. She was Vice President from 2011 to 2016 of Program Area Committee 1 on Basic Criteria, Epidemiology, Radiobiology, and Risk. She also served as Chair of the Program Committee for the 2011 Annual Meeting on “Scientific and Policy Challenges of Particle Radiations in Medical Therapy and Space Missions.” Dr. Held was a member of Scientific Committee (SC) 1-22 on Radiation Protection for Astronauts in Short-Term Missions and Phase I of SC 1-24 on Radiation Exposures in Space and the Potential of Central Nervous System Effects and an advisor to several NCRP committees.

Dr. Held is an Associate Radiation Biologist in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Biology) at Harvard Medical School (HMS). At MGH, Dr. Held leads a team that is involved in research on molecular mechanisms for the induction of bystander effects by high energy particles in cells and tissues, characterization of charged particle beam induced DNA damage responses and cell killing, development of a cancer screening platform for personalized radiation medicine, and mechanisms for regulation of DNA damage response by cell-cell communication. Dr. Held also teaches radiation biology to radiation oncology medical and physics residents and graduate students at MGH/HMS and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Dr. Held earned her PhD in biology from the University of Texas, Austin. She has served on review panels for numerous federal agencies including the National Institutes of Health, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command programs and other organizations such as the Radiological Society of North America. She is on the Editorial Boards of Radiation Research and the International Journal of Radiation Biology, and has served on committees for the National Academy of Science/National Research Council, NASA, and the American Society of Radiation Oncology. She is a past President of the Radiation Research Society.

kathryn d. held
Senior Vice President Bushberg-J

JERROLD T. BUSHBERG

Bushberg-J

is a Clinical Professor of Radiology and Clinical Professor of Radiation Oncology at University of California (UC) Davis School of Medicine. He holds the title of Director Emeritus Medical/Health Physics Programs and retired as Associate Chair of the Department of Radiology in 2018. He is currently Chair of the Board of Directors and Senior Vice President of NCRP. He is an expert on the biological effects, safety and interactions of ionizing and nonionizing radiation and holds multiple radiation detection technology patents. With over 40 y of experience he has served as a subject matter expert and an advisor to government agencies and institutions throughout the nation and around the world including the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, the World Health Organization, and the International Atomic Energy Agency in the areas of ionizing and nonionizing radiation protection, risk communication, medical physics, and radiological emergency medical management. In 2016, Dr. Bushberg was appointed Vice Chair of the Committee on Man and Radiation which is a Technical Committee of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Former Commander in the U.S. Naval Reserve, among other assignments CDR Bushberg served as Executive Officer of the Chemical/Biological/Nuclear Technical Unit 120 Pacific, a highly skilled multidisciplinary military emergency response and advisory team based out of the Alameda Naval Air Station in California. Dr. Bushberg is an elected fellow of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the Health Physics Society. He is certified by several national professional boards with specific subspecialty certification in radiation protection and medical physics and currently serves as a Director and Vice Chair of the American Board of Medical Physics. In 2014, Dr. Bushberg was awarded the NCRP Warren K. Sinclair Medal for Excellence in Radiation Science and received the Professor John C. Christiansen Distinguished Alumnus award from Purdue University School of Health Sciences in 2016. Prior to coming to the UC Davis Health System as technical director of Nuclear Medicine, Dr. Bushberg was on the faculty of Yale University School of Medicine Department of Radiology where his research was focused on radiopharmaceutical development. Dr. Bushberg has had responsibility for medical postgraduate education in medical physics, radiation (ionizing and nonionizing) biology and protection for more than 30 y. The third edition of the textbook The Essential Physics of Medical Imaging, authored by Bushberg, Seibert, Leidholdt, and Boone, is used extensively by radiology residency programs throughout the United States.

jerrold t. bushberg
Secretary LA AtwellLaura J. Atwell
Treasurer Myrna A. Young

Board of Directors

Bushberg-J

JERROLD T. BUSHBERG

Bushberg-J

is a Clinical Professor of Radiology and Clinical Professor of Radiation Oncology at University of California (UC) Davis School of Medicine. He holds the title of Director Emeritus Medical/Health Physics Programs and retired as Associate Chair of the Department of Radiology in 2018. He is currently Chair of the Board of Directors and Senior Vice President of NCRP. He is an expert on the biological effects, safety and interactions of ionizing and nonionizing radiation and holds multiple radiation detection technology patents. With over 40 y of experience he has served as a subject matter expert and an advisor to government agencies and institutions throughout the nation and around the world including the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, the World Health Organization, and the International Atomic Energy Agency in the areas of ionizing and nonionizing radiation protection, risk communication, medical physics, and radiological emergency medical management. In 2016, Dr. Bushberg was appointed Vice Chair of the Committee on Man and Radiation which is a Technical Committee of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers’ Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society. Former Commander in the U.S. Naval Reserve, among other assignments CDR Bushberg served as Executive Officer of the Chemical/Biological/Nuclear Technical Unit 120 Pacific, a highly skilled multidisciplinary military emergency response and advisory team based out of the Alameda Naval Air Station in California. Dr. Bushberg is an elected fellow of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the Health Physics Society. He is certified by several national professional boards with specific subspecialty certification in radiation protection and medical physics and currently serves as a Director and Vice Chair of the American Board of Medical Physics. In 2014, Dr. Bushberg was awarded the NCRP Warren K. Sinclair Medal for Excellence in Radiation Science and received the Professor John C. Christiansen Distinguished Alumnus award from Purdue University School of Health Sciences in 2016. Prior to coming to the UC Davis Health System as technical director of Nuclear Medicine, Dr. Bushberg was on the faculty of Yale University School of Medicine Department of Radiology where his research was focused on radiopharmaceutical development. Dr. Bushberg has had responsibility for medical postgraduate education in medical physics, radiation (ionizing and nonionizing) biology and protection for more than 30 y. The third edition of the textbook The Essential Physics of Medical Imaging, authored by Bushberg, Seibert, Leidholdt, and Boone, is used extensively by radiology residency programs throughout the United States.

jerrold t. bushberg , Chairman
AnsariA

ARMIN ANSARI

Ansari

is the Radiological Assessment Team Lead at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) serving as subject matter expert in CDC’s radiation emergency preparedness and response activities. He received his BS and PhD degrees in radiation biophysics from the University of Kansas, starting his career as a radiation biologist, and did his postdoctoral research in radiation-induced mutagenesis at Oak Ridge and Los Alamos National Laboratories. He was a senior scientist with the radiological consulting firm of Auxier & Associates before joining CDC in 2002. He has led the development of key national guidance documents including guides for population monitoring and operation of public shelters after radiation emergencies and a number of training products for public health professionals. He is a past president of the Health Physics Society, adjunct associate professor of nuclear and radiological engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology, member of Georgia East Metro Medical Reserve Corps and Gwinnett County Community Emergency Response Team, and provides consultancy to the International Atomic Energy Agency. Since 2014, he has served as member of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. He is the author of Radiation Threats and Your Safety: A Guide to Preparation and Response for Professionals and Community, a book specifically directed at audiences without radiation protection expertise.

armin ansari

JOHN J. LANZA

is the Director of the Florida Department of Health in Escambia County (FDOH-EC). Dr. Lanza is a Board-certified pediatrician with a PhD in Medical Radiation Physics from the University of Florida. Since 2001, he has been the Public Health and Medical co-chair for the Florida Department of Law Enforcement's Domestic Security Task Force Northwest Florida. Before his FDOH-EC position, Dr. Lanza worked as a pediatric emergency department physician in Lakeland, Florida and was in private pediatric practice in Longwood, Florida. Dr. Lanza is a fellow of the America Academy of Pediatrics, a past president of the Escambia County Medical Society (2004), a member of the American Medical Association, and the Florida Medical Association (FMA), where he was the chair of the FMA Council on Public Health for 8 y. He is a founding board member of the Florida Public Health Institute. In addition, he is a member of the Florida Chapter of the Health Physics Society and the national Health Physics Society where he serves as past president of their Homeland Security Section and a member of the medical response subcommittee. Dr. Lanza was recently elected to the Health Physics Society Board of Directors. In 2005, he was appointed as a Florida Commissioner on the Southeast Compact Commission for Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management. Currently, he is on the faculty of the Master of Public Health program at the University of West Florida's (UWF) School of Allied Health and Life Sciences as well as holding faculty positions at UWF's Department of Health, Leisure, and Exercise Science, and the Center for Environmental Diagnostics and Bioremediation (CEDB). With the CEDB, he was the co-principal investigator on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency funded projects dealing with local environmental health issues.

In addition, he led an 8 y research project on human health effects of toxins such as dioxin from local Superfund sites. Dr. Lanza is also a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences at the Florida State University College of Medicine. Dr. Lanza serves on the Residency Advisory Committee for the joint U.S. Army and Navy Aerospace Medicine Residency Program at Naval Air Station Pensacola. Dr. Lanza has numerous publications in the fields of health physics, environmental health, and public health preparedness. Most recently, he was a member of the NCRP scientific committee that produced Report No.165,"Responding to a Radiological or Nuclear Terrorism Incident: A Guide for Decision Makers."

john j. lanza

WESLEY E. BOLCH

is Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics in the J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Florida (UF). He serves as Director of the Advanced Laboratory for Radiation Dosimetry Studies at UF. Dr. Bolch earned his BSE degree in environmental engineering in 1984, his ME and PhD degrees in radiological physics in 1986 and 1998, respectively, from the University of Florida. He has been certified by the American Board of Health Physics since 1994 and licensed in Radiological Health Engineering by the Texas Board of Professional Engineers since 1992. In 2011, Dr. Bolch was elected Fellow of both the Health Physics Society and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. He has been a member of the Society of Nuclear Medicine’s Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee since 1993, a member of NCRP since 2005, and a member of Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) since 2005. Within the latter, he serves as C2 Secretary and Leader of the ICRP Task Group on Computational Phantoms and Radiation Transport. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed journal articles, co-authored/edited 14 books/book chapters, and served as author on two NCRP reports, two ICRP publications, and two MIRD monographs.

Dr. Bolch has managed a broad research program including (1) National Institutes of Health (NIH) and U.S. Department of Energy funded projects to construct high-resolution models of the skeleton to support dose-response studies in radionuclide therapy and radiation epidemiology; (2) NIH funded projects to develop scalable NURBS-based and voxel-based computational phantoms of adult and pediatric patients and associated software for organ dose assessment in nuclear medicine, computed tomography, interventional fluoroscopy, and radiotherapy; (3) private company funded projects to develop stereotactic kilovoltage x-ray treatments for age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma; and (4) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded projects in stochastic modeling of worker inhalation and gamma-ray exposures following radiological accidents and potential terrorist events. He is the recipient of the 2014 Distinguish Scientific Achievement Award by the Health Physics Society acknowledging outstanding contributions to the science and technology of radiation safety.

wesley e. bolch

DONALD L. MILLER

Miller D

is Chief Medical Officer at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Center for Devices and Radiological Health. He earned a BA from Yale University and an MD from New York University, and completed a residency in diagnostic radiology and a fellowship in interventional radiology at New York University Medical Center. He is board certified in Diagnostic Radiology and Vascular and Interventional Radiology. Prior to joining FDA, he practiced interventional radiology at the National Institutes of Health and the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.

Dr. Miller was elected to NCRP in 2006. He currently serves on the Board of Directors, as Chair of Program Area Committee 4 (Radiation Protection in Medicine), and as a member of several Scientific Committees. He is an author of NCRP Reports No. 168 and No. 172 and Statement No. 11. He served as a member of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Committee 3 (Protection in Medicine) from 2010 to 2017. He is an author of ICRP Publications 117, 120, 135, and 139. He was Vice-Chair for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Federal Guidance Report No. 14, is a consultant to the International Atomic Energy Agency, and is a member of the World Health Organization’s Core Group of Experts on Radiation Protection of Patients and Staff.

Dr. Miller was Professor of Radiology at the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, MD from 1993 to 2012 and has served as Associate Editor of Radiology and the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology. He is an author of more than 185 papers in peer-reviewed journals and more than 30 book chapters and reports, is a Fellow of the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) and is an Honorary Member of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. He chaired SIR’s Safety and Health Committee from 1999 to 2011 and the ACR Guidelines Interventional Committee from 2008 to 2012. His research interests have centered on radiation protection in medicine.

donald l. miller
Polly Y. Chang

Polly Y. Chang

is the Scientific Director of the Non-clinical Development Program in SRI International's Biosciences Division. Dr. Chang received her BA in mammalian physiology, MA in bioradiology, and PhD in radiation biology/biophysics from the University of California, Berkeley. She is the principal investigator (PI) on a number of National Institute of Health, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), and commercially-sponsored projects, using both in vitro and in vivo model systems to understand mechanisms of radiation injury and efficacy of medical countermeasures. As PI for the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases-supported medical countermeasure product development program, she and her team conducted a battery of studies that contributed to the Food and Drug Administration's approval of Romiplostim for hematopoietic syndrome under the Animal Rule. During her tenure at SRI, Dr. Chang has led multiple nonclinical product development programs for vaccines, biologics, metal decorporation agents, and small molecules that have resulted in over 10 approved investigational new drug applications. In collaboration with a team of SRI investigators, she is working on a BARDA-funded biodosimetry project to develop a hand-held field-deployable device for early detection of radiation exposure and triage. She has served on NCRP Scientific Committees for Report No. 181 on the evaluation of the biological effectiveness of low energy photons and electrons in inducing cancers in humans and Report No. 183 on radiation exposure in space and the potential for central nervous system effects.

Polly Y. Chang
SeibertJA

J. Anthony Seibert

SeibertJA

is Professor of Radiology at the University of California (UC) Davis School of Medicine in Sacramento, California. He received a PhD in Radiological Sciences from UC Irvine in 1982, specializing in quantitative digital fluoroscopic imaging. Directly thereafter, he took a faculty position at UC Davis Medical Center, pursuing digital imaging research, physics education efforts for graduate students and radiology residents, as well as quality control for medical imaging equipment in Diagnostic Radiology. He has continuing academic interests in digital mammography, computed tomography, interventional radiology, imaging informatics, and radiation dose tracking, assessment, and reporting. Former president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) in 2011 and current Governor of the American Board of Radiology, Dr. Seibert has served and continues to interact with many professional committees in regards to medical imaging issues and presenting technical / educational events for the AAPM, International Atomic Energy Agency, and other professional societies. For NCRP, he is a member of Program Area Committee 4. As a co-author of The Essential Physics of Medical Imaging textbook for diagnostic physics education, Dr. Seibert continues with the development of cutting edge imaging technologies and medical physics education to improve the state of imaging science for the betterment of patient care.

J. Anthony Seibert
Boyd M

Michael A. Boyd

Boyd M

is the Director of the Center for Science and Technology in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Radiation and Indoor Air/Radiation Protection Division. The Center is responsible for the development of radiation dose and risk assessment guidance and for providing technical support for radiation protection policy issues. Mr. Boyd is also the co-chair of the Federal Guidance Subcommittee of the Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards. He is a member of the NCRP’s PAC 5 and was recently elected to the NCRP Board of Directors. He is a member of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Committee 4 and chairs ICRP Task Group 98 on Application of the Commission’s Recommendations to exposures resulting from contaminated sites from past industrial, military and nuclear activities. Since 2015, he has chaired the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency's Committee on Radiological Protection and Public Health. Mr. Boyd is an active member of the Health Physics Society and is a delegate to the International Radiation Protection Association where he is currently a member of its International Congress Program Committee for IRPA 15, which will be held in Seoul, Korea in May 2020. He has a BS in Biology and MS in Public Health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Michael A. Boyd
StoryM

MICHAEL D. STORY

StoryM

is a professor at the University of Texas (UT) Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. Dr. Story earned his PhD from Colorado State University. He holds the David A. Pistenmaa, MD, PhD Distinguished Chair in Radiation Oncology, serves as Vice-Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology, Chief of the Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, and Director of the Pre-clinical Radiation Core Facility. Dr. Story serves on the editorial board of Mutagenesis and the International Journal of Particle Therapy and has served on a number of review panels for the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and other entities.

Dr. Story directs the radiobiology course for the Medical Physics graduate program and the Radiation Oncology medical resident program and was a faculty member for NASA’s Space Radiation Summer School. Dr. Story's research is focused on five areas associated with radiation exposure: (1) delineating the effects of novel superoxide dismutase compounds that can act as both radioprotector and radiosensitizer in the same setting; (2) understanding and exploiting the biological effects of tumor treating fields in combination with radiation and/or chemotherapy agents; (3) developing biomarkers of the radioresponse of lung and liver tissues to high linear-energy transfer radiation exposures, including the development of biomarkers of carcinogenic risk; (4) enhancement of carbon ion radiotherapy for pancreatic and head and neck cancers; and (5) identification of genomic or epigenomic factors that predict or are prognostic for the radioresponse in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Dr. Story's research is funded by NCI, NASA, the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, and industry.

 

michael d. story
Donahue C

CHRISTINE A. DONAHUE

Donahue C

Christine A. Donahue was elected to NCRP in 2009 and has served on the Scientific Committees 1-18 and 1-19. She is certified in comprehensive practice by the American Board of Health Physics (ABHP), and has served on the ABHP exam development panel and as Chairperson of the Professional Development Committee. Ms. Donahue received a BS in Biophysics from University of California, Berkeley in 1981, Nuclear Engineering MS program at University of Virginia, Charlottesville in 1982, and MS in Radiological Engineering from California State University, San Jose in 1987.

Ms. Donahue is currently Director of Radiological Safety Programs at CB&I managing radiological controls and program development in support of environmental remediation efforts including Navy Base Realignment and Closure activities. Ms. Donahue was the Operational Health Physics Manager and Radiological Control Manager at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California from 1994 to 2008 responsible for site-wide radiological protection activities. She has served as a DOE lead auditor for nuclear facility readiness reviews and provided technical support to radiological safety programs at Argonne National Laboratory and Nevada National Security Site. Prior to work with DOE national laboratories, she was a senior Health Physicist at Stanford University and served as the Radiation Safety Officer at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Hospital from 1987 to 1991. Ms. Donahue began her career in 1982 as a nuclear engineer with Bechtel National, Inc. in San Francisco and Pacific Gas & Electric where she provided health physics support during the first outage at the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power.

christine a. donahue
Jeffrey J. Whicker

Jeffrey J. Whicker

worked at Los Alamos National Laboratory as a health physicist and scientist for over 30 y. He received an MS in Health Physics and a PhD in Environmental and Radiological Health Science from Colorado State University and is certified by the American Board of Health Physics. Dr. Whicker is an elected Board Member of NCRP, served as a Board Member of the Health Physics Society, consulted for the International Atomic Energy Agency since 2018 on environmental sampling and remediation decisions, and was on the Editorial Board for the journal Radiation Protection Dosimetry for 8 y. He has been the recipient of numerous achievement awards including the U.S. Department of Energy Secretary’s Honor Award (2020). He is an author or co-author of hundreds of scientific publications, invited talks, book chapters, and presentations mostly on indoor and outdoor radiological air quality and measurements that span issues ranging from worker protection, homeland security, radiological dose and risk assessment for the public and the environment, and environmental quality. His research in outdoor air quality focused on aerosol transport through wind-driven suspension of contaminated soil and the effects of ecosystem disturbance on environmental transport rates. This research has broad implications for both public and ecosystem health.

Jeffrey J. Whicker

KATHRYN D. HELD

Held K

became President of the NCRP in January 2019. She held the position of Executive Director and Chief Science Officer from 2016 to 2018. She was first elected to the Council in 2006 and served on the NCRP Board of Directors from 2008 to 2014. She was Vice President from 2011 to 2016 of Program Area Committee 1 on Basic Criteria, Epidemiology, Radiobiology, and Risk. She also served as Chair of the Program Committee for the 2011 Annual Meeting on “Scientific and Policy Challenges of Particle Radiations in Medical Therapy and Space Missions.” Dr. Held was a member of Scientific Committee (SC) 1-22 on Radiation Protection for Astronauts in Short-Term Missions and Phase I of SC 1-24 on Radiation Exposures in Space and the Potential of Central Nervous System Effects and an advisor to several NCRP committees.

Dr. Held is an Associate Radiation Biologist in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Biology) at Harvard Medical School (HMS). At MGH, Dr. Held leads a team that is involved in research on molecular mechanisms for the induction of bystander effects by high energy particles in cells and tissues, characterization of charged particle beam induced DNA damage responses and cell killing, development of a cancer screening platform for personalized radiation medicine, and mechanisms for regulation of DNA damage response by cell-cell communication. Dr. Held also teaches radiation biology to radiation oncology medical and physics residents and graduate students at MGH/HMS and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Dr. Held earned her PhD in biology from the University of Texas, Austin. She has served on review panels for numerous federal agencies including the National Institutes of Health, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command programs and other organizations such as the Radiological Society of North America. She is on the Editorial Boards of Radiation Research and the International Journal of Radiation Biology, and has served on committees for the National Academy of Science/National Research Council, NASA, and the American Society of Radiation Oncology. She is a past President of the Radiation Research Society.

kathryn d. held

Jessica S. Wieder

Jessica Wieder is an expert in radiation risk communication. As a member of NCRP’s Program Area on Radiation Education, Risk Communication and Outreach, Ms. Wieder helped write NCRP Report No. 179, Guidance for Emergency Response Dosimetry, and plan the outreach for high profile publications such as NCRP Report No. 180 on Management of Exposure to Ionizing Radiation: Radiation Protection Guidance for the United States (2018), and Commentary No. 27 on the Implications of Recent Epidemiologic Studies for the Linear-Nonthreshold Model and Radiation Protection. Also working through NCRP, Ms. Wieder and Brooke Buddemeier became TED educators on how to survive nuclear fallout.

Ms. Wieder is the Director of the Center for Radiation Information and Outreach at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). She served at EPA’s senior radiation public information officer during the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, facilitated international panels on emergency response public communication, and was part of the contingency planning team for the 2011 launch of the Mars Science Laboratory. In 2013, she was awarded EPA's Exemplary Customer Service Award for her leadership in enabling all levels of government to provide quick, effective communications to the American people in response to large-scale radiological emergencies.

In 2010, Ms. Wieder was detailed to Federal Emergency Management Agency's Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives Branch, where she created the intergovernmental Nuclear/Radiological Communications Working Group. With her guidance, this group developed the nuclear detonation messaging document Improvised Nuclear Device Response and Recovery: Communicating in the Immediate Aftermath.

Jessica S. Wieder

Support Personnel

Ethics Contact

KATHRYN D. HELD

Held K

became President of the NCRP in January 2019. She held the position of Executive Director and Chief Science Officer from 2016 to 2018. She was first elected to the Council in 2006 and served on the NCRP Board of Directors from 2008 to 2014. She was Vice President from 2011 to 2016 of Program Area Committee 1 on Basic Criteria, Epidemiology, Radiobiology, and Risk. She also served as Chair of the Program Committee for the 2011 Annual Meeting on “Scientific and Policy Challenges of Particle Radiations in Medical Therapy and Space Missions.” Dr. Held was a member of Scientific Committee (SC) 1-22 on Radiation Protection for Astronauts in Short-Term Missions and Phase I of SC 1-24 on Radiation Exposures in Space and the Potential of Central Nervous System Effects and an advisor to several NCRP committees.

Dr. Held is an Associate Radiation Biologist in the Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Biology) at Harvard Medical School (HMS). At MGH, Dr. Held leads a team that is involved in research on molecular mechanisms for the induction of bystander effects by high energy particles in cells and tissues, characterization of charged particle beam induced DNA damage responses and cell killing, development of a cancer screening platform for personalized radiation medicine, and mechanisms for regulation of DNA damage response by cell-cell communication. Dr. Held also teaches radiation biology to radiation oncology medical and physics residents and graduate students at MGH/HMS and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Dr. Held earned her PhD in biology from the University of Texas, Austin. She has served on review panels for numerous federal agencies including the National Institutes of Health, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command programs and other organizations such as the Radiological Society of North America. She is on the Editorial Boards of Radiation Research and the International Journal of Radiation Biology, and has served on committees for the National Academy of Science/National Research Council, NASA, and the American Society of Radiation Oncology. She is a past President of the Radiation Research Society.

kathryn d. held
EEO Contact Myrna A. Young

(as of April 21, 2021)

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Last modified: April 8, 2019