NCRP

Scientific Committees

The major work of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) is accomplished through its scientific committees. These are constituted by the Board of Directors.

Committee

Title

Chair

CC 2 Meeting the Needs of the Nation for Radiation Protection
Newhauser,W

WAYNE D. NEWHAUSER

Newhauser,W

is the Director of the Medical and Health Physics Program at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, holder of the Dr. Charles M. Smith Chair in Medical Physics, and Chief of Physics at the Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center. He is a board certified and licensed medical physicist with specialization in advanced-technology radiotherapies. Dr. Newhauser is an expert in proton radiation therapy, dose reconstructions, and risk estimation and reduction. His current research projects seek to improve long-term outcomes of survivors of childhood and adult cancers. He and his multidisciplinary team of collaborators are known for their early use of Monte-Carlo methods and high-performance computing in proton therapy, including neutron shielding, treatment planning, and estimation of stray radiation exposures. He received the Innovation Excellence Award in 2012 in recognition of his laboratory's research involving in-silico clinical trials to compare advanced-technology radiotherapies.

Dr. Newhauser has published more than 85 peer-reviewed journal articles, leads federal research grants, and mentors graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. He has served in leadership roles in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the American Nuclear Society, and the Health Physics Society. He serves on the International Advisory Board of the journal Physics In Medicine and Biology and is a corresponding member of EURODOS. After receiving a BS in nuclear engineering and MS and PhD degrees medical physics from the University of Wisconsin, he worked at the German National Standards Laboratory, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

wayne d. newhauser
Williams J

JACQUELINE P. WILLIAMS

Williams J

completed her undergraduate degrees at the University of Nottingham, followed by her post-doctoral training in radiation biology at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, University of London, U.K. Shortly after completing her studies, she joined the faculty at the University of Rochester, New York, in the department of Radiation Oncology, and recently in the department of Environmental Medicine. Since that time, Dr. Williams has accrued more than 25 y of experience in radiation biology and related fields and has been involved in a wide range of research areas, including clinically-related oncologic studies and clinical trials, tumor blood flow studies, long-term carcinogenic studies, and pharmacological and toxicological projects.

Her current research interests involve identifying mechanisms that underlie the initiation and progression of radiation-induced late normal tissue effects as a consequence of high-dose clinical treatment/accidental exposures or the lower doses associated with either space travel or mass exposures with the goal of developing protection or mitigation strategies. Dr. Williams has served as the President of the Radiation Research Society, the Research Chair on the Board of the American Society for Radiation Oncology, and has been elected to, and is currently serving as, Council Member to the International Association for Radiation Research.

jacqueline p. williams
PAC 1 Woloschak-G

GAYLE E. WOLOSCHAK

Woloschak-G

is a Professor of Radiation Oncology and Radiology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. She and her group have been involved in studies of molecular consequences of radiation exposure, late tissue effects associated with radiation, and the use of radiation-inducible nanomaterials for cancer imaging and therapy. Dr. Woloschak also teaches radiation biology to radiation oncology and radiology residents, cardiology trainees, and graduate students and manages the Advanced Grant Writing Workshop for the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). She earned her PhD in medical sciences from the University of Toledo (Ohio) and did post-doctoral studies in molecular biology at the Mayo Clinic. She has served on review panels for various federal agencies including the National Institutes of Health, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the U.S. Department of Energy, RSNA, the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, and others. She is currently an associated editor for Radiation Research, the International Journal of Radiation Biology, PLOS One, and Nanomedicine. She is Vice President of NCRP Program Area Committee 1, has served on organizational committees for several NCRP meetings, and has been involved in committees for several NCRP reports. She also served as Vice-President of the Radiation Research Society.

gayle e. woloschak
Bernstein

JONINE BERNSTEIN

Bernstein

is an Attending Epidemiologist at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York City. Her core research focus is on breast cancer and gliomas and on understanding cancer risk and progression in order to identify those at highest risk because of gene carrier status, environmental exposures, or a combination of both. Dr. Bernstein is the Principle Investigator of the National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded international 24-center Women's Environmental Cancer Radiation and Epidemiologic (WECARE) Study which was specifically designed to examine the interaction of radiation exposure and genetic predisposition in breast cancer, especially radiation-associated contralateral breast cancer (CBC) among 3,700 women with CBC and unilateral breast cancer.

The WECARE Study has served as the source population for studies of candidate genes such as BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, and ATM, candidate gene pathways of DNA damage response involved in radiation-induced double-strand break repair—ATM, CHEK2, P53 binding protein (53BPI), and MDC1, Mre11, Rad50, and Nbs1 (e.g., MRN nuclease complex), a genome-wide association study, and most recently mammographic density. The global hypothesis across these studies is that women who carry certain types of mutations will be more susceptible to breast cancer than noncarriers, and possibly to radiation-associated breast cancer. Dr. Bernstein currently serves as a member of the Board of Directors of the American College of Epidemiology, the External Advisory group for the NCI-sponsored Breast Cancer Family Registry, the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, and most recently the NCI Board of Scientific Counselors-Clinical Sciences and Epidemiology.

For the past two years, she has served on the Organizing Committee of the American Statistical Association Conference on Radiation and Health (2012 and 2014 meetings), and was Co-Chair of the Third North American Congress of Epidemiology, held in June 2011 for which she was honored by the 2012 ACE Award for Leadership and Service in Epidemiology. Dr. Bernstein holds a PhD in Epidemiology from Yale University, an MS in Applied Biometry from the University of Southern California, and an AB from Brown University. Before joining the faculty at MSKCC, she was Deputy Director of the Division of Epidemiology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

jonine bernstein
SC 1-24P2 Radiation Exposures in Space and the Potential for Central Nervous System Effects braby

LESLIE A. BRABY

braby

has been a Research Professor at Texas A&M University since 1996. His previous experience includes Biology and Chemistry Department Staff Scientist from 1971 to 1991 and Radiation Physics and Chemistry Section Manager from 1991 to 1995 at Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. He received his BA degree from Linfield College and PhD from Oregon State University in 1972.

Dr. Braby is a former member of the NCRP Board of Directors and a member of several NCRP scientific committees (SC) including SC 88 on Fluence as a Basis of a System of Radiation Protection for Astronauts, SC 1-7 on Research Needs for Deep Space Missions, chair of SC 1-11 on Safety Considerations for Pulsed Fast Neutron Surveillance Systems, SC 6-1 on Uncertainties in Measuring External Beam Irradiation, SC 1-20 on the biological effects of low energy x rays, and Chairman of SC 6-5 on Safety of Cargo Inspection Systems Using High Energy Photons. He was also Chair of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) working committee on characterizing low level radiation exposure, and member of ICRU working committee to prepare a report on microdosimetry.

 

leslie a. braby
Jacob Raber Jacob Raber
SC 1-26 Approaches for Integrating Radiation Biology and Epidemiology for Enhancing Low Dose Risk Assessment Preston_2014

R. JULIAN PRESTON

Preston_2014

is currently a Special Government Employee (Expert) with the Radiation Protection Division of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). He was previously the Associate Director for Health for the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory of EPA. He also served as Director of the Environmental Carcinogenesis Division at EPA and as senior science adviser at the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology. He has been employed at the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and has served as associate director for the Oak Ridge–University of Tennessee Graduate School for Biomedical Sciences. Dr. Preston's research and current activities have focused on the mechanisms of radiation and chemical carcinogenesis and the approaches for incorporating these types of data into cancer risk assessments.

Dr. Preston currently serves on two NCRP committees and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board and a member of an Office of Science and Technology Policy Committee on Low Dose Radiation Research. Dr. Preston was chair of Committee 1 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), a member of the ICRP Main Commission, and the Representative and a member of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). He served as Chair for the National Research Council's Committee to Assess the Scientific Information for the Radiation Exposure Screening and Education Program and on the Task Group on the Biological Effects of Space Radiation. He is an associate editor of Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis and Chemico-Biological Interactions. Dr. Preston has had more than 200 peer-reviewed papers and chapters published. He received his BA and MA from Peterhouse, Cambridge University, England, in genetics and his PhD from Reading University, England, in radiation genetics.

r. julian preston

Werner Rühm

is Acting Director of the Institute of Radiation Protection and leads the Medical and Environmental Dosimetry Group at the Helmholtz Center Munich, Germany. In addition he is professor at the Medical Faculty of the University of Munich.

Dr. Rühm has been a member of Committee 1 (C1) of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) since 2005. He served as C1 Secretary from 2012 to 2016, and has continued as C1 Chair since 2016. He was a member of ICRP Task Group (TG) 83 (Protection of Aircraft Crew Against Cosmic Radiation Exposure), and is currently chairing ICRP TG91 on Dose and Dose-Rate Effectiveness Factor. Since 2005 he has served as Editor-in-Chief of the Radiation and Environmental Biophysics journal. In 2014 he was elected Chair of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS), and in 2017 was appointed as a member of the German Radiation Protection Commission (SSK), and as Co-chair of the SSK Committee on Radiation Risk. He has published on various topics including quantification of neutron exposure of atomic-bomb survivors, cosmic-ray exposure of air crew, the role of neutrons in risk assessment of atomic-bomb survivors, risks from low-dose-rate exposures, behaviour of radionuclides in the environment, internal exposures from incorporated radionuclides, and radiation measurement techniques.

Werner Rühm
SC 1-27 Evaluation of Sex-Specific Differences in Lung Cancer Radiation Risks and Recommendations for Use in Transfer and Projection Models WeilM

MICHAEL M. WEIL

WeilM

is a professor in the Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences at Colorado State University (CSU). His research, which takes advantage of murine models of radiation carcinogenesis and leukemogenesis, is focused on understanding how radiation exposure can lead to cancer and why some individuals may be more susceptible than others. At CSU, Dr. Weil teaches a graduate level course in cancer genetics and lectures in courses on cancer biology, environmental carcinogenesis, principles of radiation biology, and the pathobiology of laboratory animals.

Dr. Weil earned his PhD in Microbiology from the University of Texas at Austin and was trained in cancer genetics and radiation biology in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Biochemistry and the Department of Experimental Radiotherapy at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Dr. Weil is a Radiation Research Society council member and has served on National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Defense, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration grant review panels.

michael m. weil
BoiceJ

JOHN D. BOICE, JR.

BoiceJ

is currently Professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee. He was President of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), Bethesda, Maryland from 2012 to 2018. Dr. Boice is an international authority on radiation effects and served on the Main Commission of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for 20 y and as a U.S. advisor to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation for 25 y. During 27 y of service in the U.S. Public Health Service, Dr. Boice developed and became the first chief of the Radiation Epidemiology Branch at the National Cancer Institute.

Dr. Boice has established programs of research in all major areas of radiation epidemiology, with major projects dealing with populations exposed to medical, occupational, military and environmental radiation. These research efforts have aimed at clarifying cancer and other health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, especially at low-dose levels. Dr. Boice's seminal discoveries and over 500 publications have been used to formulate public-health measures to reduce population exposure to radiation and prevent radiation-associated diseases.

He has delivered the Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture at the NCRP and the Fessinger-Springer Lecture at the University of Texas at El Paso. In 2008, Dr. Boice received the Harvard School of Public Health Alumni Award of Merit. He has also received the E.O. Lawrence Award from the Department of Energy — an honor bestowed on Richard Feynman and Murray Gell-Mann among others — and the Gorgas Medal from the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States. In 1999 he received the outstanding alumnus award from the University of Texas at El Paso (formerly Texas Western College). Dr. Boice directs the Million U.S. Radiation Workers and Veterans Study to examine the lifetime risk of cancer following relatively low-dose exposures received gradually over time.

john d. boice, jr.
PAC 2 Pryor-K

KATHRYN H. PRYOR

Pryor-K

has been a member of Program Area Committee (PAC) 2 since 2007 and a member of NCRP since 2010. She has served on Scientific Committees 2-4, 2-5, 2-7, 1-19, and 6-9. Ms. Pryor is currently on the NCRP Board of Directors and is Scientific Vice President of PAC 2. She received her BS in Biology in 1979 and MS in Radiological Sciences in 1981, both from the University of Washington.

Ms. Pryor was the Chief Health Physicist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, providing management and technical support to the PNNL Radiation Protection Division since 1992. She also served as the Chief Radiological Engineer for the design of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Project. Ms. Pryor previously held radiation protection technical support positions at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station and the Trojan Nuclear Plant, and was the Radiation Safety Officer at the University of Southern California Health Sciences Campus.

Ms. Pryor is a Fellow member of the Health Physics Society (HPS) and served as President-Elect, President, and Past President from 2010 to 2013. She is certified in comprehensive practice by the American Board of Health Physics (ABHP), and served on the ABHP both as a member and Chair from 1998 to 2002. She is currently the President of the American Academy of Health Physics. Ms. Pryor was awarded the William McAdams Outstanding Service Award by ABHP in 2007 and the John P. Corley Meritorious Service Award by the Columbia Chapter of HPS in 2003.

kathryn h. pryor
SC 2-8 Operational Radiation Safety Program — Revision to Report No. 127 (1998) Pryor-K

KATHRYN H. PRYOR

Pryor-K

has been a member of Program Area Committee (PAC) 2 since 2007 and a member of NCRP since 2010. She has served on Scientific Committees 2-4, 2-5, 2-7, 1-19, and 6-9. Ms. Pryor is currently on the NCRP Board of Directors and is Scientific Vice President of PAC 2. She received her BS in Biology in 1979 and MS in Radiological Sciences in 1981, both from the University of Washington.

Ms. Pryor was the Chief Health Physicist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, providing management and technical support to the PNNL Radiation Protection Division since 1992. She also served as the Chief Radiological Engineer for the design of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Project. Ms. Pryor previously held radiation protection technical support positions at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station and the Trojan Nuclear Plant, and was the Radiation Safety Officer at the University of Southern California Health Sciences Campus.

Ms. Pryor is a Fellow member of the Health Physics Society (HPS) and served as President-Elect, President, and Past President from 2010 to 2013. She is certified in comprehensive practice by the American Board of Health Physics (ABHP), and served on the ABHP both as a member and Chair from 1998 to 2002. She is currently the President of the American Academy of Health Physics. Ms. Pryor was awarded the William McAdams Outstanding Service Award by ABHP in 2007 and the John P. Corley Meritorious Service Award by the Columbia Chapter of HPS in 2003.

kathryn h. pryor
PAC 3 Ansari

ARMIN ANSARI

Ansari

is the Radiological Assessment Team Lead at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) serving as subject matter expert in CDC’s radiation emergency preparedness and response activities. He received his BS and PhD degrees in radiation biophysics from the University of Kansas, starting his career as a radiation biologist, and did his postdoctoral research in radiation-induced mutagenesis at Oak Ridge and Los Alamos National Laboratories. He was a senior scientist with the radiological consulting firm of Auxier & Associates before joining CDC in 2002. He has led the development of key national guidance documents including guides for population monitoring and operation of public shelters after radiation emergencies and a number of training products for public health professionals. He is a past president of the Health Physics Society, adjunct associate professor of nuclear and radiological engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology, member of Georgia East Metro Medical Reserve Corps and Gwinnett County Community Emergency Response Team, and provides consultancy to the International Atomic Energy Agency. Since 2014, he has served as member of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. He is the author of Radiation Threats and Your Safety: A Guide to Preparation and Response for Professionals and Community, a book specifically directed at audiences without radiation protection expertise.

armin ansari

Buddemeier B

BROOKE R. BUDDEMEIER

Buddemeier B

is an associate program leader in the Global Security Directorate of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). He supports the Risk and Consequence Management Division in their efforts to evaluate the potential risk and consequence of radiological and nuclear terrorism. Mr. Buddemeier is a member of NCRP and served on the scientific committees which developed Commentary No. 19 - Key Elements of Preparing Emergency Responders for Nuclear and Radiological Terrorism (2005) and NCRP Report No. 165 – Responding to a Radiological or Nuclear Terrorism Incident: A Guide for Decision Makers (2010).

From 2003 through 2007, he was on assignment with the Department of Homeland Security's as the weapons of mass destruction emergency response and consequence management program manager for Science and Technology's emergency preparedness and response portfolio. He supported Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Homeland Security Operations Center as a radiological emergency response subject matter expert. He also facilitated the department's research, development, test and evaluation process to improve emergency response through better capabilities, protocols and standards. Prior to that, he was part of the LLNL Nuclear Counterterrorism Program and coordinated LLNL's involvement in the National Nuclear Security Administration's Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) for California, Nevada and Hawaii.

RAP is a national emergency response resource that assists federal, state and local authorities in the event of a radiological incident. As part of RAP's outreach efforts, Mr. Buddemeier has provided radiological responder training and instrumentation workshops to police, firefighters, and members of other agencies throughout the nation and abroad. He has also provided operational health physics support for various radiochemistry, plutonium handling, accelerator and dosimetry operations. He is Certified Health Physicist who received his Master's in Radiological Health Physics from San Jose State University and a BS in Nuclear Engineering from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

brooke r. buddemeier
SC 3-2 Recommendations for Instrument Response Verification and Calibration for Use in Radiation Emergencies
Leticia Pibida
KlemicG

Gladys A. Klemic

KlemicGis a physicist with the National Urban Security Technology Laboratory (NUSTL), a federal resource of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security which supports the development of technologies for emergency response agencies. She designs and conducts laboratory tests of radiation detectors, and operational field evaluations of prototype and commercially available equipment for firefighter and law enforcement agencies. She is active in national standards development and has been with NUSTL and its predecessor, the Environmental Measurements Laboratory since 1990. Her earlier work specialized in environmental thermoluminescence dosimetry, including conducting dosimeter research, measurements and analysis, and leading international intercomparisons. She has authored or co-authored 40 scientific and technical publications and is a member of the Health Physics Society and the National Fire Protection Association. She has a BS degree in Physics from Wayne State University and an MS degree in Physics from New York University.

Gladys A. Klemic
PAC 4 Miller D

DONALD L. MILLER

Miller D

is Chief Medical Officer for Radiological Health at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Center for Devices and Radiological Health. He earned a BA from Yale University and an MD from New York University, and completed a residency in diagnostic radiology and a fellowship in interventional radiology at New York University Medical Center. He is board certified in Diagnostic Radiology and Vascular and Interventional Radiology. Prior to joining FDA, he practiced interventional radiology at the National Institutes of Health and the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.

Dr. Miller was elected to NCRP in 2006. He currently serves on the Board of Directors, as Chair of Program Area Committee 4 (Radiation Protection in Medicine), Chair of the Nominating Committee, and as a member of several scientific committees. He is an author of NCRP Reports No. 168 and No. 172 and Statement No. 11. He served as a member of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Committee 3 (Protection in Medicine) from 2010 to 2017. He is an author of ICRP Publications 117, 120, 135 and 139. He was Vice-Chair for the U.S. Environmental Protection Administration's Federal Guidance Report No. 14, is a consultant to the International Atomic Energy Agency, and is a member of the World Health Organization's Core Group of Experts on Radiation Protection of Patients and Staff.

Dr. Miller was Professor of Radiology at the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, Maryland from 1993 to 2012 and has served as Associate Editor of Radiology and the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology. He is an author of more than 185 papers in peer-reviewed journals and more than 30 book chapters and reports, is a Fellow of the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) and is an Honorary Member of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. He chaired SIR's Safety and Health Committee from 1999 to 2011 and the ACR Guidelines Interventional Committee from 2008 to 2012. His research interests have centered on radiation protection in medicine.

donald l. miller

Dr. Lawrence Dauer

LAWRENCE T. DAUER

is Associate Attending Physicist, and Associate Clinical Member in the Departments of Medical Physics and Radiology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York City. He earned an MS in Health Physics and a PhD in Adult Education. He is certified in comprehensive health physics by the American Board of Health Physics and is past chair of the Radiation Safety Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), past President of the Greater New York Chapter of the Health Physics Society (HPS), Executive Council Member of the Medical Physics Section of the HPS, a Member of the Joint Safety Committee of the Society for Interventional Radiology and the American College of Radiology, past council member of the Radiological and Medical Physics chapter of the AAPM, and a member of editorial and review boards of several scientific journals. He serves as the Chair of the MSKCC Emergency Management Committee, a member of the Radiation Injury Treatment Network. In 2005, he received the Elda E. Anderson Award from HPS. He is a Council member and serves on he Board of Directors of the NCRP. He also serves as a member of the International Commission on Radiological Protection Committee 3 on protection in medicine, a member of the science council for the International Organization for Medical Physics, and was on the program committee for the International Atomic Energy Agency's International Conference on Radiation Protection in Medicine-Setting the Scene for the Next Decade. He serves on the Radiation Advisory Committee of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board. He has several publications in the topical areas of radiation protection and risks in the fields of detection, radiology, interventional radiology, x-ray imaging, nuclear medicine, and radiation oncology, as well as surgery and medicine.

lawrence t. dauer
SC 4-5 Radiation Protection in Dentistry Supplement: Cone Beam Computed Tomography, Digital Imaging, and Handheld Dental Imaging
Alan G. Lurie

Alan G. Lurie

Lurie-Alan

Alan G. Lurie is professor and chair of the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Diagnostic Sciences and chair of the Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Oral Health and Diagnostic Sciences, at the University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine. He has John Dempsey Hospital appointments in the Departments of Dentistry and Diagnostic Imaging and Therapeutics. He has been a full-time member of the dental school faculty since 1973, during which time he has done R0-1 research on radiation carcinogenesis, administered predoctoral and graduate educational programs, performed clinical research, and performed imaging care on patients in both dental and medical radiology settings.

He is past president and a current member of the School of Dental Medicine Council, co-founder of the University of Connecticut Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Clinic, and a member of numerous dental school and institutional committees. He is also an active member of his specialty nationally, having served as Councilor for Public Policy and Scientific Affairs of the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, and Past President of the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology. Dr. Lurie has more than 100 publications in the refereed literature, and numerous presentations to local, state, national and international organizations.

Alan G. Lurie
Kantor_

Mel L. Kantor

Kantor_is a professor in the Department of Oral Health Practice in the College of Dentistry with a joint appointment as professor in the Department of Epidemiology in the College of Public Health.

Dr. Kantor served on the faculties of University of North Carolina and University of Connecticut before moving in 1993 to University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey where he was Professor of Diagnostic Science, New Jersey Dental School, and Professor of Epidemiology, School of Public Health prior to moving to the University of Kentucky in August 2011. He is a Diplomate and past-president of the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and a former member of the Board of Directors of the American Association for Dental Research. Dr. Kantor serves on several editorial boards and recently completed his term as a member of the Commission on Dental Accreditation. His research interests involve population-based and survey research, specifically radiology practice behaviors and use of selection criteria guidelines, quality and level of evidence in the radiology literature, and screening for medical conditions in a dental setting.

Mel L. Kantor
SC 4-7 Evaluating and Communicating Radiation Risks for Studies Involving Human Subjects: Guidance for Researchers and Reviewing Bodies Timins J

JULIE E.K. TIMINS

Timins J

is a Diagnostic Radiologist, board certified in General Radiology and in Nuclear Medicine. Her medical practice has been varied, including Chair of Nuclear Medicine at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Lyons, New Jersey; Staff Radiologist at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital and St. Peter’s Medical Center, New Brunswick, New Jersey; diagnostic imaging in an inner-city hospital in Jersey City; and Mammography and Women’s Imaging in an outpatient facility in Morristown, New Jersey. Dr. Timins is Chair of the New Jersey Commission on Radiation Protection, and sits on the New Jersey Radiologic Technology Board of Examiners. She served on the NCRP Board of Directors and has participated on several Annual Meeting Program Committees. She is past president of the Radiological Society of New Jersey and recipient of that organization’s Gold Medal Award. Dr. Timins is a Fellow of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and former member of the Council Steering Committee. She served as Vice-Chair for Practice Guidelines and Technical Standards of the ACR Commission on Quality and Safety. She is a recipient of the Advisory Committee Service Award of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, in recognition of distinguished service on the National Mammography Quality Assurance Advisory Committee. The American Association for Women Radiologists has honored Dr. Timins with the Professional Leadership Award for Mid-Career/Senior Faculty and the President’s Award. In appreciation of service as an Affiliate Member of the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, she was presented with the Board of Directors Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Field of Radiation Protection, for participation on the H-30 Task Force and development of the White Paper on Bone Densitometry.

Julie E.K. Timins
SC 4-8 Improving Patient Dose Utilization in Computed Tomography Mannudeep Kalra

Mannudeep K.S. Kalra

Mannudeep Kalra

is an Assistant Radiologist at the Massachusetts General Hospital Imaging's Divisions of Thoracic Imaging and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance, Computed Tomography (CT), and Positron Emission Tomography Program. He is also an Assistant Professor of Radiology with the Harvard Medical School. Dr. Kalra received both an MBBS and an MD from the Government Medical College and Hospital. He performed his residency at the Government Medical College and Hospital and the Sanjay Gandhi Post-Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences. In addition to his clinical work in chest and cardiac imaging, Dr. Kalra has keen interest in research pertaining to CT technology, radiation dose reduction, CT virtual autopsy, image post-processing and radiology informatics. Dr. Kalra has won numerous awards from majorradiology national and international societies for his work related to CT radiation dose.

Mannudeep K.S. Kalra
SC 4-9 Medical Exposure of Patients in the United States

FRED A. METTLER, JR.

MettlerF

is currently Professor Emeritus and Clinical Professor at the Department of Radiology at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine. He was chairman of the department for 18 y from 1994 to 2003. He is currently in the Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Service at the New Mexico Federal Regional Medical Center.

He graduated with a BA in Mathematics from Columbia University and in 1970 he received his MD from Thomas Jefferson University. He performed a rotating internship at the University of Chicago and subsequently completed a Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Residency at Massachusetts General Hospital. He received an MS in Public Health from Harvard University in 1975. He is a fellow of both the American College of Radiology and the American College of Nuclear Physicians. He is board certified in both radiology and nuclear medicine.

Dr. Mettler has authored over 360 scientific publications including 20 textbooks, and holds four patents. The books are on Medical Management of Radiation Accidents, Medical Effects of Ionizing Radiation and Radiology and Nuclear Medicine. He was a Scientific Vice President of NCRP and remains a member. He has chaired several committees for the Institute of Medicine/National Research Council and is a member of the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board of the National Academies. He is also an academician of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. Dr. Mettler has been listed in "The Best Doctors in America" since 1994 as an expert in both nuclear medicine and radiation injury. He has been a certifying examiner for the American Board of Radiology for 30 y.

He was the United States Representative to the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation 28 y. He is an Emeritus Commissioner of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP). He was the Health Effects Team Leader of the International Chernobyl Project. He has served as an expert on radiation effects and accidents for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the International Agency on Research on Cancer, and for the Costa Rican, Peruvian, Panamanian, Polish governments. He was a co-author of the NCRP and ICRP reports on radiation protection during radiological terrorism and has been a member of multiple subgroups on radiological terrorism for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. He is currently a health advisor to the Japanese Cabinet for the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

fred a. mettler, jr.

MAHADEVAPPA MAHESH

Mahesh

is the Professor of Radiology and Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. He is also the Chief Physicist at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He is also the Professor of Environmental Health and Engineering at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Dr. Mahesh obtained his PhD in Medical Physics from Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. Dr. Mahesh is board certified from the American Board of Radiology in diagnostic radiological physics and is a member of the Radiation Control Advisory Board for the State of Maryland. His research interests are in medical imaging, particularly in areas of multiple-row detector computed tomography (MDCT), interventional fluoroscopy, and digital mammography. As chief physicist, he oversees the quality assurance program for the diagnostic radiology that includes maintaining compliance with regard to state and federal regulations and ensuring safe use of radiation to patients. He often provides counsels to patients concerned over their radiation exposure from diagnostic x-ray examinations.

Dr. Mahesh is the editor of the Physics Columns (Technology Talk and Medical Physics Consult) for the Journal of American College of Radiology (JACR) since 2007. He is also the Associate Editor of JACR, Deputy Editor for Academic Radiology, Editorial Board Member for RadioGraphics and Radiology journals. He is the Treasurer for the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and board member of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT). He is a fellow of the AAPM (2007), ACR (2009), American College of Medical Physics (2011), and SCCT (2011).

Dr. Mahesh has been invited to be the United Nations-International Atomic Energy Agency (UN-IAEA) expert to participate in IAEA activities. Dr. Mahesh is the author of the textbook titled MDCT Physics: The Basics – Technology, Image Quality and Radiation Dose. He publishes and lectures extensively here in the United States and internationally in the area of MDCT technology, radiation doses in medical imaging, and other medical physics areas.

Dr. Mahesh is on the NCRP Council and was a member of NCRP Scientific Committee (SC) 6-2 that published NCRP Report No. 160, Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the United States Population. He is the co-chair of NCRP SC 4-9 on Medical Exposure of the U.S. population.

mahadevappa mahesh
SC 4-10 Error Prevention in Radiation Therapy

STEVEN G. SUTLIEF

Sutlief_S

is currently a medical physicist with the Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center in Phoenix, Arizona and an adjunct professor at San Diego State University. He received his PhD in experimental particle physics from the University of Washington and subsequently completed a post-doctoral fellowship in radiation therapy medical physics at the University of Washington with research in intensity modulated radiation therapy. He has been chief medical physicist at the Veterans Affairs (VA) Puget Sound Health Care System in Seattle and an affiliate faculty member in the University of Washington School of Medicine, a professor at the University of California San Diego and a medical physicist with Landauer Medical Physics. Dr. Sutlief worked to advance radiation therapy within the VA, including agency-wide radiotherapy equipment modernization, radiotherapy device interconnectivity, consultation for the VA National Health Physics Program, participation in several investigations, and development of qualification standards for therapeutic medical physicists. He has coauthored more than 50 articles and book chapters related to therapeutic medical physics. Dr. Sutlief developed and taught the physics curriculum for the Bellevue College Medical Dosimetry program. He has served as a consultant to the International Atomic Energy Agency and as a member of the Radiation Oncology planning group for the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise. Dr. Sutlief was a Co-organizer for the AAPM Summer School on Quality and Safety in Radiation Therapy and was a faculty member for the Veterans Health Administration Biennial Conference on Radiation Oncology. He actively participates in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, where he has served on many committees and on several task group reports. He is currently an NCRP Council member.

steven g. sutlief
SC 4-11 Gonadal Shielding During Abdominal and Pelvic Radiography

Donald P. Frush

Frush-D

is Professor of Radiology at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford. Dr. Frush received a BS from The University of California Davis, MD from Duke University, was a pediatric Resident at University of California San Francisco from 1985 to 1987, a radiology resident at Duke, and finished a pediatric radiology fellowship at Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati in 1992.

Dr. Frush’s research interests are predominantly focused on pediatric body computed tomography (CT), including technology assessment, techniques for pediatric multidetector computed tomography examinations, assessment of image quality, and CT radiation dosimetry and dose reduction. International affiliations include the World Health Organization and the International Atomic Energy Agency. Dr. Frush is currently a board member of the Society for Pediatric Radiology as well as NCRP, Chair of the Image Gently Alliance, Trustee of the American Board of Radiology, and a current Fellow of Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance.

Donald P. Frush

Keith J. Strauss

is an Associate Professor at the University of Cincinnati School of Medicine and the head of the Section of Clinical Medical Physics within the Radiology Department of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Mr. Strauss received a BA degree in physics from the University of Manchester and an MSc degree in radiologic physics from the University of Chicago. He began his career as a Diagnostic Medical Physicist at Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago before focusing on pediatric Radiology in Boston and Cincinnati since 1984.

Mr. Strauss’ research interests are predominantly focused on altered clinical configurations of x-ray imaging equipment designed to manage the pediatric patient’s radiation dose while maintaining good quality imaging. International affiliations include the International Atomic Energy Agency and pediatric hospitals associated with Project HOPE. Mr. Strauss is active on committees within the American Association of Physicists (AAPM) in Medicine and American College of Radiology (ACR). He is currently the Vice Chair of the Image Gently Alliance, a Fellow of the ACR, and a Fellow of the AAPM.

Keith J. Strauss
PAC 5 Napier-B

BRUCE A. NAPIER

Napier-B

is a Staff Scientist in the Environmental Analysis and Engineering Group at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington and has been for the past 41 y. Mr. Napier works with the development and operation of models concerned with the environmental transport of radiological and chemical contaminants.

His expertise and experience lie in the areas of radiation dose reconstruction, computer modeling, environmental analysis, and human health risk analysis. He is an author of the widely-used GENII computer code. Mr. Napier was the Chief Scientist for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project that evaluated releases from the Hanford Site during production of plutonium. He is now a Principal Investigator for the U.S./Russian Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research, working on the dose reconstructions at the Russian Mayak Production Association for both the workers at and the populations living near the points of atmospheric release and along the Techa River downstream. Mr. Napier is a Scientific Vice President and past member of the Board of Directors of NCRP, a past committee member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board and the National Academy of Sciences, a Fellow of the Health Physics Society, and past Chair of oversight panels for the National Cancer Institute's Chernobyl Studies.

bruce a. napier
SC 5-2 Radiation Protection for Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) and Technologically Enhanced NORM (TENORM) from Oil and Gas Recovery Kennedy-W

WILLIAM E. KENNEDY, JR.

Kennedy-W

has extensive experience as a project manager, task leader, and individual contributor covering a broad range of health physics and nuclear engineering topics. He received his BS and MS degrees in Nuclear Engineering from Kansas State University. Mr. Kennedy has been involved in the development of environmental pathway and radiation dosimetry models used to assess potential health and environmental impacts that resulted from releases of radionuclides to the environment.

He specializes in the use of these models in environmental dose reconstruction, radioactive materials transport, radioactive waste disposal, and evaluation of nuclear facility operating practices. Over the past 37 y, Mr. Kennedy has led and contributed to a variety of projects for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the U.S. Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, and private industry. He has been involved with development of the technical basis for revised standards and regulations, and serves as the chair of ANSI/HPS N13.12, Surface and volume Radioactivity Standards for Clearance. He served as a consultant to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna, Austria, and was a member of the IAEA Advisory Groups to evaluate the Derivation of Exempt Quantities for Application to Terrestrial Waste Disposal and Derivation of Exempt Quantities for Recycle of Materials from Nuclear Facilities.

He was an invited lecturer for IAEA training courses on Management of Radioactive Waste from Nuclear Power Plants at Argonne National Laboratory; on Safety Assessment Modeling for Low and Intermediate Radwastes in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and in Cairo, Egypt; and on Environmental Monitoring in Kiev, Ukraine. In 1990, he received the Health Physics Society's (HPS) prestigious Elda E. Anderson Award. He served as a member of the HPS Board of Directors from 1998 through 2001 and was selected as a fellow of the society in 2002. He was a member of the U.S. delegation to the 10th Congress of the International Radiation Protection Association in Hiroshima, Japan.

william e. kennedy, jr.
PAC 6 Simon S

STEVEN L. SIMON

Simon S

received a BS in Physics from the University of Texas, an MS in Radiological Physics from the University of Texas Health Sciences Center in Dallas, and a PhD in Radiological Health Sciences from Colorado State University. Early in his career, he worked in medical physics and was the first treatment planner for clinical trials of treatments of solid tumors with negative pi-mesons at the Los Alamos Physics Meson Facility. Later specializing in environmental radioactivity, he directed the first nationwide monitoring program of the Marshall Islands for residual contamination from nuclear testing. He also participated in the radiological monitoring of numerous other nuclear test sites worldwide including Johnston Island, French Polynesia, and Algeria and has lead, or participated in, health risk studies of fallout exposures in Utah, the Marshall Islands, and Kazakhstan.

In 2000, Dr. Simon joined the National Cancer Institute's Radiation Epidemiology Branch as an expert in dose reconstruction and presently heads the Dosimetry Unit in that group. Steve is a member of NCRP and has been an Associate Editor of Health Physics for 20 y. In 2011 during the Fukushima crisis, Steve was deployed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to the U.S. Embassy in Japan to assist with the protection of American citizens.

steven l. simon
SC 6-11 Dosimetry Guidance for Medical Radiation Workers With a Focus on Lung Dose Reconstruction

R. CRAIG YODER

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directed Landauer's technical activities relating to radiation dosimetry, particularly for applications in radiation protection from 1983 through his retirement in 2015. Additionally, he oversaw subsidiary and partner businesses located in Australia, Brazil, China, France, Mexico, Japan, Sweden and Turkey.

An internationally known expert in radiation monitoring, Dr. Yoder led Landauer's transition from film and thermoluminescent dosimetry technology to optically stimulated luminescence, an assignment that required strategic planning and direction in areas spanning scientific research, product development, manufacturing, laboratory operations and marketing. From 1993 to 2001, he was Vice President of Operations and managed Landauer's manufacturing and analytical laboratory activities in addition to overseeing research and development programs.

Dr. Yoder is a member of NCRP and former President of the Council on Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards. He has served on several national and international committees to develop dosimetry standards. He was a member of a National Research Council committee that examined the accuracy of film badge measurements made during atmospheric nuclear weapons testing.

Dr. Yoder earned his MS and PhD degrees in Bionucleonics at Purdue University and received a BS in Pre-Medicine from Davidson College. He also completed the Executive Program at Stanford University. He is Certified in Comprehensive Health Physics by the American Board of Health Physics.

r. craig yoder

LAWRENCE T. DAUER

is Associate Attending Physicist, and Associate Clinical Member in the Departments of Medical Physics and Radiology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York City. He earned an MS in Health Physics and a PhD in Adult Education. He is certified in comprehensive health physics by the American Board of Health Physics and is past chair of the Radiation Safety Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), past President of the Greater New York Chapter of the Health Physics Society (HPS), Executive Council Member of the Medical Physics Section of the HPS, a Member of the Joint Safety Committee of the Society for Interventional Radiology and the American College of Radiology, past council member of the Radiological and Medical Physics chapter of the AAPM, and a member of editorial and review boards of several scientific journals. He serves as the Chair of the MSKCC Emergency Management Committee, a member of the Radiation Injury Treatment Network. In 2005, he received the Elda E. Anderson Award from HPS. He is a Council member and serves on he Board of Directors of the NCRP. He also serves as a member of the International Commission on Radiological Protection Committee 3 on protection in medicine, a member of the science council for the International Organization for Medical Physics, and was on the program committee for the International Atomic Energy Agency's International Conference on Radiation Protection in Medicine-Setting the Scene for the Next Decade. He serves on the Radiation Advisory Committee of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board. He has several publications in the topical areas of radiation protection and risks in the fields of detection, radiology, interventional radiology, x-ray imaging, nuclear medicine, and radiation oncology, as well as surgery and medicine.

lawrence t. dauer
SC 6-12 Development of Models for Brain Dosimetry for Internally Deposited Radionuclides

Richard Leggett

Leggett Ris a research scientist in the Environmental Sciences Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). He received his PhD in mathematics from the University of Kentucky in 1972 and taught mathematics at the Ruhr University in Bochum, Germany, and the University of Tennessee before joining the Health Physics Division at ORNL in 1976. His main research interest is in physiological systems modeling, with primary applications to the biokinetics and dosimetry of radionuclides and radiation risk analysis. He is a member of Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the ICRP Task Group on Internal Dosimetry. His physiological systems models of the human circulation, skeleton, and gastrointestinal transfer and his systemic biokinetic models for a number of elements are used by ICRP as dosimetry and bioassay models. He is the author of ICRP Publication 70, Basic Anatomical and Physiological Data for Use in Radiological Protection: The Skeleton and co-author of a number of other ICRP reports including the series of documents on doses to members of the public from intake of radionuclides (1989 to 1996), the updated Reference Man document (2002), and the Human Alimentary Tract Model (2006). He has authored over 100 open literature publications and in 1995 was named ORNL Author of the Year for the paper, “An Age-Specific Kinetic Model of Pb Metabolism in Humans.”

Richard Leggett
PAC 7 Radiation Education, Risk Communication, and Outreach HyerR

Randall N. Hyer

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Randall N. Hyer, Senior Fellow and Assistant Director for Environmental, Health and Safety, Center for Risk Communication.

Dr. Hyer graduated with distinction from the U.S. Naval Academy, and served 12 y on active duty in the U.S. Navy. After earning his medical degree from Duke University, Dr. Hyer served as the 40th Winter-Over Medical Officer and Assistant Officer-in-Charge with Operation DEEP FREEZE at McMurdo and South Pole Stations in Antarctica. Dr. Hyer earned his PhD from Oxford, studying the molecular genetics of juvenile diabetes and helped determine the role of the insulin gene in disease susceptibility.

In 1994, the National Institutes of Health awarded Dr. Hyer the "NIH Outstanding Research Award for Clinical Trainees." Trained in public health at Walter Reed Hospital and Harvard University, Commander Hyer supported four major military operations in the European, African, and southwest Asian theatres to include service as Chief Public Health Advisor for the Kosovo operations and Deputy Surgeon for the Mozambique flood relief operations. Dr. Hyer then spent 4 y at the World Health Organization (WHO) in Geneva as the first WHO Civil Military Liaison Officer and served as part of the WHO's outbreak response team to deadly outbreaks like anthrax, SARS, and avian influenza as well as having organized missions during the 2005 Tsunami response. His experiences with the media in outbreaks and emergencies led him to coauthor the popular WHO handbook, Effective Media Communication During Public Health Emergencies.

Appointed a U.S. Congressional Fellow for Senator Pete V. Domenici (R-New Mexico), he helped introduce legislation to safeguard genetic privacy that eventually became the Genetic Information Non-discrimination Act (GINA) of 2008. In 2005, Dr. Hyer joined Merck Vaccine Division in Global Medical Affairs and Policy. His focus has been the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. In 2009, he was transferred to MSD in Tokyo, Japan.

Randall N. Hyer

Responsible for each area is a committee chaired by a Scientific Vice President. These scientific program area committees are charged with evaluating the need for new NCRP work in the area and formulating their recommendations on the scope of the proposed new work and individuals who might be considered to chair any new report-writing committee that is constituted. These recommendations are submitted to the Board of Directors for action.

When the Board concludes that a new report-writing committee should be commissioned, the work begins with the selection of a committee chair, approval of committee membership based on consultation with the chair, and concurrence with the proposed scope of work prepared by the scientific program area committee and/or the chair.

Committee size varies considerably depending upon the subject area and the complexity of the undertaking. The usual size of scientific committees is 6 to 10 members.

A technical member of the NCRP Secretariat staff is assigned to work with and for each scientific committee. Committees also have access to consultants and advisors should these be needed in developing their work.

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The review process for draft reports is elaborate and comprehensive. It includes, first, review by a selected group of “critical reviewers.” Second, following modification on the basis of the comments of the critical reviewers, the report is submitted to the full Council membership and the organizations participating in the review process. Further modification on the basis of the comments received follows, with the goal of reaching an essentially unanimous acceptance of the material included in the report.

Scientific report-writing committees usually move into inactive status when they have completed their assigned tasks. This occasion is subsequent to publication of the pertinent scientific report. This retains, for a limited time, a source of advice and interpretation of published materials. Subsequently, a committee is usually disbanded.

Appointments to the membership of a scientific program area committee are governed by the following policy.

Scientific program area committee appointments, including those of chairmen, shall be considered to have been made at the time of the Board of Director’s meeting following the annual meeting which is closest to the time of actual appointment. Initial appointments to these standing scientific committees shall be for periods of two, four or six years, with the terms of approximately one-third of the membership expiring every two years. The chairman of the committee shall propose individuals for appointment and identify those proposed for initial two-year appointments, those proposed for initial four-year appointments and those proposed for initial six-year appointments. Subsequent appointments shall be for a period of six years. Retiring members may be proposed for reappointment. Proposed appointments (with biographical information) shall be submitted to the Executive Director prior to the Board of Directors’ meeting at which action on the proposed appointments is to be taken.

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Last modified: May 27, 2015